Latin Language: alternate translation

KorbenDallas

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I guess the main idea behind the alternate translation of the early Latin (or whatever you wanna call it) is based on the following:
  • no matter what language the characters are in, the original protolanguage words sounded the same.
  • those ma, pa, water, etc...
  • some words got changed with time but back in the day even in your language any word was sounding similar to the protolanguage version of the same word. Archaic synonyms come to mind...
It would also mean that Scriptio Continua rules got messed with in order to produce improper word breaks resulting in improper translations, i.e. interpunct. This in turn makes Piranesi a suspects, well, both of them actually.
  • Scriptio continua is a style of writing without spaces, or other marks between the words or sentences.
scriptio_continua.jpg

Those interested can attempt to decipher the Scipio family sarcophagi inscriptions. Try to consider the name Scipio as a regular word, and not a name. Also consider words like consol and censor to be a console (not a consul), and a sensor (not a censor). The problem with deciphering what the inscriptions really say is related to a multitude of languages the deciphering person needs to know. One needs to be able to navigate German, English, Russian, etc.

For example, according to my neighbor, this "scipio" word sounds similar to "chained" in Russian, or "restricted of any movement" so to speak. I think he either read, or watched something on the issue, but he would not fess up. I'll keep on bugging him though.

Barbatus, aka Barbatos: is an earl and duke of Hell, ruling thirty legions of demons and has four kings as his companions to command his legions.

Piranesi-TombaScipioBarbatus.jpg

Tricksters erased the beginning...
Essentially, CORNELIUS could be a part of several words.
Additionally those words are one word, which could be broken down any way one wants. TPTB did it their way, and we’ve been had.
  • The sarcophagi (there were actually two in there) could be a part of some tech device.
  • The actual sarcophagi do not exist any longer. At least this is my understanding.
  • May be it was much bigger than the copy on display.
scipio_sarcophagus.jpg

Source

It sounds like the tomb was under the below structure, which was conveniently destroyed. The entire story of the Tomb (lost - found - lost - found) is weird enough to make a note of the fact.

barbscipio.jpg

Additionally look at the name Tarquinius. This is not really a name, but a title with a specific numeric order, and all of those Tarquinius dudes are the same person. Essentially we have only one Tar Quinius. Some food for thought:
Also as far as Julius Caesar’s last name goes. It is most likely not Caesar at all (that’s if he ever had one.) Caesar is a title just like with every other “caesar” out there.

The Roman name with "Quietus" in it, could simply mean "to quit".

Or you could play with the Pantheon inscription.


Latin is a dead language for a reason. What we have inscribed on the ancient architecture is not Latin, it’s a protolanguage. We simply do not read it right. Everything is in the way it sounds, not in the specific characters it’s written in.
 

zxcv0

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Very interesting. And it aligns perfectly with the idea that Roman numerals are fake for no other reason than the fact that their complexity makes it unlikely that such a number system was ever used seriously. Associating Latin with Romans is no different to associating pyramids to ancient Egyptians. If it is actually a protolanguage, then it supports the view that Romans as we know them in history class today are a complete fabrication, or at the worst wholly misrepresented.

Also, caesar = kaiser in German = which translates to emperor. One could make the argument that kaiser derives from Caesar. Or you could just as easily argue that the rough pronunciation of the word (KAIZER) was there before Mr Julius and the Romans (if the Romans actually ever existed in their popular guise).
 

EmmanuelZorg

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Also, caesar = kaiser in German = which translates to emperor. One could make the argument that kaiser derives from Caesar. Or you could just as easily argue that the rough pronunciation of the word (KAIZER) was there before Mr Julius and the Romans (if the Romans actually ever existed in their popular guise).
It is also claimed that Tzar / Czar is another word derived from Caesar
 

SuperTrouper

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it never made any sense to me why lots of my parents' generation were taught latin as a language in school..
learning a dead language 100s of years after it's going out of use... very odd.. it's not as ifit was taught during history or archaeology lessons either!
I went through grammar school in the 1990s and had to take Latin for two years. Other streams had to take Old Greek in addition to Latin. I never understood why we had to take it, either, as it was never really explained to us. Needless to say, I remember very little of it.
 

0harris0

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I never understood why we had to take it, either
it's pretty mental to think about that.. why not teach one of the 1000s of existing world languages that could be actually useful!?
what did the education board suppose all these latin speaking teens were gonna do? rebuild the holy roman empire?! :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
Post automatically merged:

oh no, wait, they tried doing that before... my bad :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

Feralimal

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it's pretty mental to think about that.. why not teach one of the 1000s of existing world languages that could be actually useful!?
what did the education board suppose all these latin speaking teens were gonna do? rebuild the holy roman empire?! :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
Post automatically merged:

oh no, wait, they tried doing that before... my bad :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
I don't know, but I suspect Latin and Greek (and other languages e.g. Arabic and Hebrew) could be very useful. They may give a deeper understanding of the derivation and etymology of the words we use. There could be languages within languages (e.g. legalese, polari, numerology) but that you would need the code/depth of knowledge to unlock.
 

Mabzynn

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The pantheon has always confused me...

I've never understood how L-F-dictates son of Lucius?

Also, the etymology of the word Agrippa is suspect at best.

1) Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and 'ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin.

or this explanation,

2) From Latin Agrippa of uncertain origin. Possibly borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἀγρίππας (Agríppas), although this is disputed since the name doesn't appear in Greek sources contemporary with the early Roman Republic, when such a praenomen was popular.


My favorite part about the character Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa:

He had a father named Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa (supposedly named after his own father Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa). His father had an elder brother named Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa. Oh, and the daughter was named Vipsania. It's like they completely stopped trying.

Unless there really was some asshole named Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa who named both of his boys the same thing as a joke?
 

RowOfEleven

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I don't know, but I suspect Latin and Greek (and other languages e.g. Arabic and Hebrew) could be very useful. They may give a deeper understanding of the derivation and etymology of the words we use. There could be languages within languages (e.g. legalese, polari, numerology) but that you would need the code/depth of knowledge to unlock.
I believe you are correct. The definitions of most words can be derived by their Greek or Latin roots. So, learning one or both of these in school would be a tool for understanding our mother tongue in a deeper way.
 

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