Kings of Florida, and vanished white Native American Kingdoms

The Wack

Active member
Messages
64
Reactions
200
@The Wack, have you ever crossed Australia east to west, or north to south entirely? Have some bizarre rumorish info, so just wondering so far.
Driven from east coast to west, through the top states following/staying north of the tropic of capricorn till hitting the west coast, and completed runs up and down the most of the west and east cost. I don't like the cold so stay, typically in the northern half of the country...

I have learned a bit since then, and next run will be leaving maps and preconcieved ideas (or knowing cause someone else said) about what is 'beyond the vaninishing point of human perspective', the invisible capstone Is that place, and this IS NOT A PYRAMID

Screenshot_2018-07-05-15-24-04.png

its a road stretching across a Flat plain towards the horizon. The nonexistent capstone being the vanishing point/ creation point. There is new land waiting for us to find, first we need to see it in our 'minds eye', and find the courage to ignore the maps and experts and head for that vanishing/creating point... aboriginal Dreamtime and sending young men on Walkabout (to discover their own world). They pushed the ball to try to stop us creating more... I think REALM is the perfect descriptor, this place can be what we want and agree it to be... Throw away your tel-lie-vision and the preconceived notion that 'your too late, its all been explored already...

Sorry for ranting off-topic, the above pic is also the guide book to hiding big'uns in plain sight...
Here is a another pyramid for gigles..

Screenshot_2018-07-07-07-40-01.png
 
Last edited:
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,016
Reactions
15,669
Have you ever crossed it like this. Or do you know anyone who did? (Asking for a reason)

australia_maps.png
 

The Wack

Active member
Messages
64
Reactions
200
Have you ever crossed it like this. Or do you know anyone who did? (Asking for a reason)

Basically done the east-west, bit farther north, but essentially coast to coast, long story/trip, was doing a Cape York/ Gulf of Carpinteria hunting trip for a couple weeks... ended up down in Perth 6 weeks later. I wasn't living by calanders, clocks or odometers back then. 20 years ago, young, carefree and self-sufficient.
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,561
Reactions
4,918
"The red Indian was superimposed upon another race," Harris begins, "which disappeared." The Hopewell, he writes were late-comers, who raised their mounds of earth over a much older temple built by pharaonic Egyptian emigres to their most important deities-Isis, the queen of heaven, and her husband, Osiris, the god of resurrection.

Harris (professor of ancient languages) found that the Volunteer State's very name corresponds precisely and without interpolation from the Egyptian tenn esse, literally, "the land" (tenne) of Isis (Greek for the original Esse). In Ancient America, Russel Bennett Stafford observed that Iroquois Indian reverence for five, ancestral clans, each one signified by a specific animal, recalls another name for the Egyptian king of the gods-Iroquai_one of five totem animals associated with Amon.

Pau-ti-Taui was a title of Amon-Ra. And Pautiwa is the Chief Council of Deities among the Zuni (pueblo tribal people in New Mexico).

The names Suwanee and Savannah (Sawannah) are philologically equivalent. The ground for in either case is Suwan, which has been affected by the adjectival termination in Suwanee, and by a re-duplication in Savannah. And the traveler up the Nile commonly makes his destination to be the town of Assuan, at the foot of the First Cataract, the Arabic article has been prefixed to the name Suan, which the Greeks, on their part, transliterated as Suene -clearly the same name we find in Florida and in Georgia (indicating Egyptian colonists). If written in the form of Sauan, it will divide into Sau+An; that is, "the Children of Osiris."

Another language clue is Bimini (a Bahama island about 60 miles east of Miami). The roots of its name in the Egyptian Baminini, or "Homage to (ini) the Soul ( ba) of Min," the divine patron of long-distance travelers, appropriately enough for a sea-faring people. Guatemala, is a local native derivative of the original Egyptian Watem-Ra, the "Way of Ra's rest," a name that does indeed, conform to Guatemala's western location in relation to travelers from the distant Nile Valley. He found, too, that the Bay of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico is accurately described in the ancient Egyptian khampetche for a curving body of water.

In the 1970's, Barry Fell, a British-born professor noticed the Mi'kmaq Indians had a writing that was similar to what is known as "sucker-fish" writing. The Mi'kmaq, along with the Algonkians, were the only native Americans to use an indigenous written language. It was logographic, or composed of single symbols representing entire words or phrases (ie: the symbol % meaning "percent"). This was the same kind of system developed by the early dynastic (perhaps proto-dynastic) Egyptians. When he compared their hieroglyphs to Mi'kmaq "sucker-fish writings," he was shocked to find that they not only had many characters in common, but that these shared logograms had identical or equivalent meanings. Their tribal name is rooted in the word megu-ma-waach, for "spiritual power", associated with the Megu-Mu-Wesu-recalled in oral traditions as master magicians, fair-skinned foreigners who arrived from over the Atlantic Ocean very long ago, when they bequeathed their magical powers to the earliest Mi'kmaq wizards. In the Mi'kmaqs' spoken language, Waban, Muskun, and Oweaoo are identical to the same ancient Egyptian words for "sunrise", "heaven", and "circle", respectively.
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,016
Reactions
15,669
Lol. Will get to Australia at some point. This is some coo-coo stuff which I personally have hard time grasping, but weirdness prevails :)
 

asatiger1966

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
1,015
I had gone looking for old trees recently. Trees over 500yo are few and far between. I'd be interested to know where all this tree ring data came from, or if my searching was lackluster and 1000yo trees are more common than I thought.
My team was in Leachville, Arkansas in 1975-1976 at a construction project. The name was "DItch 81". Part of the project was the building of a small flood control dam on" Ditch 81". The Army Corps of Engineers found an ancient village in a forest 40 acres square of the oldest and largest Cypress trees in America. The tree doctors shut down the contractors projess till the trees could be researched. Try looking there for information on tree rings. The village was the oldest evered discovered. It was publicky called first row crops in Delta LOL. They had a goodly amount of odd technology and a lot of black stone coffins about 12 inches long.
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,016
Reactions
15,669
Just to verify. 12 inches? Who could be inside of such a small thing?
 

ISeenItFirst

Well-known member
Messages
651
Reactions
1,337
My team was in Leachville, Arkansas in 1975-1976 at a construction project. The name was "DItch 81". Part of the project was the building of a small flood control dam on" Ditch 81". The Army Corps of Engineers found an ancient village in a forest 40 acres square of the oldest and largest Cypress trees in America. The tree doctors shut down the contractors projess till the trees could be researched. Try looking there for information on tree rings. The village was the oldest evered discovered. It was publicky called first row crops in Delta LOL. They had a goodly amount of odd technology and a lot of black stone coffins about 12 inches long.
I've spent some time in an old growth cypress grove. Still, seems the whole tree ring thing is more art than science just like every other dating method we use. We invent reasons why the rings don't match the history. Then use tautological arguments to confirm. I'd be more interested in the village. 12 inches??
 

asatiger1966

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
1,015
Just to verify. 12 inches? Who could be inside of such a small thing?
The coffins were carved black onyx. Carved in the old European style where the top is raised and beveled where the head rests.most were eight inch long by two inches high. They were found scattered in a field about 200 feet from village. The locals told us along the St. Francis river the coffins could be found also. There was a small Civil War battle fought at the St. Francis river crossing.
 

ISeenItFirst

Well-known member
Messages
651
Reactions
1,337
The coffins were carved black onyx. Carved in the old European style where the top is raised and beveled where the head rests.most were eight inch long by two inches high. They were found scattered in a field about 200 feet from village. The locals told us along the St. Francis river the coffins could be found also. There was a small Civil War battle fought at the St. Francis river crossing.
Hollow? Hinged lids? What makes them coffins, just shape? Just to start... many questions.

Can't find anything about the village find online....
 

asatiger1966

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
1,015
Apologies for my stubbornness here. Are we talking about inches or feet?
Inches and solid, object weight about four pounds, had a very deep black surface , gave the impression of depth. A tidbit, the government has several firms that seem to end up on these projects. We encountered this one on more that one occasion. This company was also at the Cordell Hull Dam in Tennessee. While excavating the lower generator building , a rock face collapsed and exposed a craven. Work was halted and the project shut down. The archeologist came spent about three weeks and ordered the cave sealed. Th opening is now a rather thick concert wall incorporated into the structure. This company was a union run corporation. Company men wore white hard hats, the union wore yellow. All union men sent home with pay till work stated again. One of the married engineers, that I had met, and our family became friends, on a project in Kansas, he was building an artificial bat shit plant. Lubricant used on artillery shells, told me that the cave went on forever and had mummies, art work on walls and writing that looked Egyptian. Also learnt from one of the companies older engineers " Earl " that he was coming back later and sink a shaft a ways off for entry to the complex.
Oh, I forgot this company built most of the underground missile bases in America.
>
Getting older forgot the pictures. Cordell Hull Dam
 

Attachments

Last edited:

ISeenItFirst

Well-known member
Messages
651
Reactions
1,337
Interesting. Very interesting. I've never seen anything like that in my hi sec work.
I don't think I would jump to coffin though, based on the description, could it have had some other use?
I dunno what onyx is used for except as decorative.
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,016
Reactions
15,669
That’s some crazy story. Not like we did not hear about things like that happening, but I have never heard a first hand account.

Thank you very much for the story.
 

asatiger1966

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
1,015
Hollow? Hinged lids? What makes them coffins, just shape? Just to start... many questions.

Can't find anything about the village find online....
Interesting. Very interesting. I've never seen anything like that in my hi sec work.
I don't think I would jump to coffin though, based on the description, could it have had some other use?
I dunno what onyx is used for except as decorative.
I do not have a clue. The Captain ,PE, said it was onyx so it was onyx. The locals seemed to think it was common to find along the fields near the river. They called them coffins and said that the pot hunters paid good money for them. The village was located on Big lake which Ditch 81 drained into. About six to eight miles west of Leachville. the New Madrid earthquake of 1812 had its epicenter not two miles from the village. The whole area sunk forty feet down and changed the drainage path. Sand blew out of the ground and covered everything 2-5 feet deep. That was a long time ago. your site stirred my memory and there you go.
 

Top