Jacksonville's architect Henry John Klutho. Who was he, and did he exist?

KorbenDallas

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#1
It appears we might have one additional "appointee" of an architect in the history of the after-fire rebuilding. This time we have this gentleman named Henry John Klutho. Mr. Klutho assisted with rebuilding Jacksonville after the Great Fire of 1901. The fire was truly devastating, and is considered to be the third worst in the history of all the Great Fires which took place in the United States. Jacksonville was only topped by 1906 San Francisco, and 1871 Chicago.

great_fire_jacksonville_1901.jpg Aftermath_of_Great_Fire_of_1901.jpg

A few facts about the Great Fire of Jacksonville: In eight hours, the fire burned 146 city blocks, destroyed more than 2,368 buildings, and left almost 10,000 residents homeless. Seven human deaths were reported. (death rate is border line ridiculous obviously)

This Fire appears to be a classic case similar to the one in Seattle in 1889, and a whole bunch of other ones. No need to talk about all those trees, and utility poles surviving the inferno. This thread is about Henry John Klutho.

Henry John Klutho
1873-1964
HenryKlutho.JPG HenryKlutho_1.jpg
Henry John Klutho was an American architect known for his work in the "Prairie School" style. Klutho was born in Breese, Illinois, a small midwest town. He lived there until the age of 16, when he left for St. Louis, Missouri to study business. When he became interested in architecture, he moved to New York City to learn more, and became an architect.

Klutho read about the Great Fire of 1901 in the New York Times and recognized the opportunity of a lifetime. He finished his current projects in New York and quickly moved to Jacksonville. Klutho introduced himself to prominent businessmen and politicians, and within a month, he was commissioned to design the six-story Dyal-Upchurch Building, the first large structure in the barren downtown area. Other projects soon followed, including the new City Hall and private homes.

Klutho-designs.jpg

His contributions to the rebirth of the city were mostly ignored, except by his colleagues. Klutho lived to be 91, but had little money, making his later years difficult. Following his death, much of his work was razed or "renovated". - Wikipedia

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1. He died in 1964. There is only ONE photo that I found. How is it possible?
2. This guy resembles Elmer Fisher way too much.
3. Questionable education and background.
4. Sad life finale, which is very common with these appointees.

I have not looked too deep into the Jacksonville Fire and Mr. Klutho, but a quick scan of his story appeared to fit the profile.
 

humanoidlord

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#2
It appears we might have one additional "appointee" of an architect in the history of the after-fire rebuilding. This time we have this gentleman named Henry John Klutho. Mr. Klutho assisted with rebuilding Jacksonville after the Great Fire of 1901. The fire was truly devastating, and is considered to be the third worst in the history of all the Great Fires which took place in the United States. Jacksonville was only topped by 1906 San Francisco, and 1871 Chicago.


A few facts about the Great Fire of Jacksonville: In eight hours, the fire burned 146 city blocks, destroyed more than 2,368 buildings, and left almost 10,000 residents homeless. Seven human deaths were reported. (death rate is border line ridiculous obviously)

This Fire appears to be a classic case similar to the one in Seattle in 1889, and a whole bunch of other ones. No need to talk about all those trees, and utility poles surviving the inferno. This thread is about Henry John Klutho.

Henry John Klutho
1873-1964
View attachment 3049 View attachment 3050
Henry John Klutho was an American architect known for his work in the "Prairie School" style. Klutho was born in Breese, Illinois, a small midwest town. He lived there until the age of 16, when he left for St. Louis, Missouri to study business. When he became interested in architecture, he moved to New York City to learn more, and became an architect.

Klutho read about the Great Fire of 1901 in the New York Times and recognized the opportunity of a lifetime. He finished his current projects in New York and quickly moved to Jacksonville. Klutho introduced himself to prominent businessmen and politicians, and within a month, he was commissioned to design the six-story Dyal-Upchurch Building, the first large structure in the barren downtown area. Other projects soon followed, including the new City Hall and private homes.


His contributions to the rebirth of the city were mostly ignored, except by his colleagues. Klutho lived to be 91, but had little money, making his later years difficult. Following his death, much of his work was razed or "renovated". - Wikipedia

* * * * *​
1. He died in 1964. There is only ONE photo that I found. How is it possible?
2. This guy resembles Elmer Fisher way too much.
3. Questionable education and background.
4. Sad life finale, which is very common with these appointees.

I have not looked too deep into the Jacksonville Fire and Mr. Klutho, but a quick scan of his story appeared to fit the profile.
once again look at all those variable designs in that drawing!
 

Onthebit

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#6
What if we did something in the future that caused these cataclysms and were seeing reverberations from our future.....I dont even know how to articulate what I am thinking. Seems too odd were finding this stuff out at this time..... or they're letting us know because a reset is coming.......Have any of you heard of Mud-fossil University..........hes insane but intriguing.... I think hes partially onto something.... (anyone know how to change my keyboard from french to English- having punctuation problems- windows 10 lol)
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#7
What if we did something in the future that caused these cataclysms and were seeing reverberations from our future.....I dont even know how to articulate what I am thinking. Seems too odd were finding this stuff out at this time..... or they're letting us know because a reset is coming.......Have any of you heard of Mud-fossil University..........hes insane but intriguing.... I think hes partially onto something.... (anyone know how to change my keyboard from french to English- having punctuation problems- windows 10 lol)
Mud-Fossil... are you talking about those biblical giants?

And by the way, was anybody else able to find another photo of this architect guy Klutho? For the gentleman who died in 1964 there definitely should be a few more out here.
 

Onthebit

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#8
Mud-Fossil... are you talking about those biblical giants?
.
Not exactly but the rocks being petrified and salted petrified body parts of animals.......maybe - anyway I look at rocks with a different perspective now...........he claims the stone is human dna....... DNA reports

maybe were born and given a fake past for some reason and nothing really is new under the sun except we live and die continuously in a program that has a fault in it???
 
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Onthebit

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#10
ya; Im not sure about that one though..... they say you can walk inside that one and I'm thinking he didn't perish in a flood or he would be laying down...who knows but petrified parts are intriguing.

because I know how to butcher and cure meat I find his theory crazily intriguing...
 

Jenny

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#12
Mud-Fossil... are you talking about those biblical giants?

And by the way, was anybody else able to find another photo of this architect guy Klutho? For the gentleman who died in 1964 there definitely should be a few more out here.
Can't find any photos or any mention of family - very weird. And again, died alone without any money...
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#13
Can't find any photos or any mention of family - very weird. And again, died alone without any money...
Like one too many of those. Too much time to look into them all, but they appear to be a carbon copy of each other with slight alterations to the life story.
 

ISeenItFirst

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#16
Pierre Charles Le nfant might fit the bill. He is credited with designing Washington DC. (Took him 3 months apparently).

Le'Enfant also died in poverty. He was a mason, studied art in France, fought in the rev. War, where he was wounded and taken prisoner, and then somehow, became an engineer and city designer. Apparently he wouldn't let the surveyor even see his plan, and the surveyor ended up making his own plan when Le Enfant was removed. He still gets all the credit even though, he didn't seem to finish any of his engineering projects. Was in charge of "redesigning" several forts as well, guess what shape they were. Would love to see the plan he sent, but web says no higher res image available, and none of the writing is legible. Wonder if the LOC would let me see the original. I got to get down there someday and get a library card.

Seems he was asked to teach engineering and declined. Probably because he know nothing about it. Then later took the job anyhow. Seems like a convienent way to spruce up his bonafides, but he probably needed convincing that he wouldn't be exposed. Wonder if he ever had a class or even a single engineering pupil.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#17
I think we need a sub-forum to start collecting these "assigned" architects in one place. It's probably in vain, but something might come out of it eventually.
 

ISeenItFirst

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#18
I figured Lenfant would be a good study case, as his name is still well known, and a fair bit is known about his life.

Really want to see his plan, and read the writing on that sheet.
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The library of Congress has a class on Monday morning to learn how to use their research tools and access closed stacks and controlled reading rooms. I will try to make it. Then I will see if they let me view the original Le Enfant plan that was supposedly sent by him to George Washington. I really want to know what all of those notes say. I have a few other things I want to look at, but if I have time, is there anything else I should see about?
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*** Something came up, and I'll not make that class this morning. Interestingly, they have some new shelves going in the geography room and a whole section of atlases is not available until further notice, which would have limited what I wanted to see anyhow.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#19
Hopefully you can make it there one day. Judging by what I’ve seen so far, whatever you might see in there will not be sufficient to justify the greatness of the achievement. But it will be enough to plug the hole though.
 

ISeenItFirst

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#20
I'll go next week, for the next class. Good thing I did not go today, hockey parade gonna have traffic all messed up. I'll need a library card and a researcher card I think, to access the controlled stuff.

Many of the docs we discuss here are held there. Once I get my creds there, maybe I'll start a thread soliciting research ideas, and do regular research trip. I have wanted to see the piri Reis maps in person anyhow.

I really want to get in there, it makes me suspicious that the atlas section is unavailable due to construction.
 
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