Is Tartaria a Fairy tale?

sonoman

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Greetings SH folks!

Is Tartaria a Fairy tale?

It may be, but not in the way you might think. before this mystical Tartaria came to my attention I was dabbling in other mysteries so my first impressions when it did were that it sure seemed alot like some of the Druid and/or Celtic lore/law.

today I ran across this article: From Transylvania to Tunbridge Wells - Chapter 3a

a good read and seems to connect many other dots as well as completely damning the vatican and everything they have initiated since their con cep tion.

however, this is what caught my eye in relation to this the thread title.

In studying the fairy in the context of both Celtic and medieval history it must be remembered that the tribes to whom the Victorians ascribed the appellation ’Celtic’ were not a homogeneous or integrated racial group and the Celts themselves never saw themselves as a cohesive, pan-European nation of peoples.

Furthermore, like their medieval descendants, they had, within an indistinct collection of tribes, a patriarchal, misogynistic culture, which stands in complete opposition to the popular view that the matriarchal ’Celts’ promoted a policy of sexual equality.
When we looked at the stories contained in the ’Annals of Irish History’, the Irish ’Book of Invasions’ or the Welsh ’Mabinogian’ we would have been inclined to think that these documents were about the Celts when in fact they were about a strange race of foreigners who reigned alongside these dark-haired, swarthy, stocky little farmers for nearly two thousand years. From these stories we obtain our idea of what the ’Celts’ were like, when in fact they weren’t Celts at all, they were Scythians, the Elves, the Fairies, The Aryans.
its all hearsay to me until its not. I plan to put forth some effort to verify the claims and the proofs provided about the total catholic fraud but I havnt seen any mention of how the Druids fit in to the whole Tartarian mystery so when I found this similarity, I figured it was worth its own thread.

Its probably not very compelling without some background info on the Druids but I have a plate full ATM but I will come back to this at some point with more on them. hopefully sooner rather than later but if anyone else has something or even gets the same feeling please share.

Im not very good at threads or spell binding/casting in general so please forgive me for this one if its not up to standards. I really dont like to start threads much anyway but Ive felt this might be a key all along to this Tartarian mystery so I wanted to see if others might also.

maybe a hint: Tartan - Wikipedia

In the Realm of the Ring Lords
It has long been known that there was once a continent, inhabited by a great king-tribe, which was noted for its lemurs.

Hence, it has been dubbed "Lemuria", setting a good many enthusiasts searching for its sunken whereabouts beneath the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans as if it were the lost city of Atlantis.

Maybe such a concealed territory does exist. However, the fact is that (by whatever name it was once known) the mightiest Lemurian land tract was never lost.

It was the great mainland continent which still exists today, stretching across eastern Europe through the one-time USSR.

This was the original realm of the great Ring Lords, tracing back to about 40,000 BC - the homeland of the Oupires of the Pict-sidhé. It was the land of the mighty Warlords of the Dragon before they migrated and battled their way southwards in the ever-cooling climate of the last ice-age. Undoubtedly, the environment was once very warm there, as is proved by the fact that the lemurs travelled about as far south as they could possibly go by land before Madagascar and the Comoros broke away from the southern African mainland.

What did these early god-kings look like?

Well, they are now thoroughly identifiable from their preserved remains, which have been excavated at various sites from as far afield as Transylvania and Tibet. With their light-brown to red hair and pale eyes, the leather-clad men stood at least six foot six inches and upwards, while even the women were over six feet tall. Undoubtedly, these forebears of the Gaelic and Celtic High Kings were among the most awesome warriors of all history.
 
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Ice Nine

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Don't sell yourself short, this is an excellent topic/idea. I'll start digging around for some Druid information.

I've actually wondered about the origins of why the Scottish plaids are called Tartans. So I find this doubly intriguing. Originally it might have just referred to the manner of dress of the Tartarians, it didn't start out with any pattern at all, not as the plaids we think of today.
This is crazy, it's been starring us in the face all along.

And I of course instantly started thinking about Tolkien,

Lots to think about, I'll be back.
 

welkyn

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When we looked at the stories contained in the ’Annals of Irish History’, the Irish ’Book of Invasions’ or the Welsh ’Mabinogian’ we would have been inclined to think that these documents were about the Celts when in fact they were about a strange race of foreigners who reigned alongside these dark-haired, swarthy, stocky little farmers for nearly two thousand years. From these stories we obtain our idea of what the ’Celts’ were like, when in fact they weren’t Celts at all, they were Scythians, the Elves, the Fairies, The Aryans.
Having studied Welsh and Irish mythology a great deal, I can say that this is definitely the case. There are references to what we would nowadays think of as "Celts" in the texts, esp. in the Lebor Gabala Erenn (though even "Celt" is a more recent ethnonym, no more than 300 years old), but most of the material surrounds people who are both phenotypically and culturally distinct from what we know of the "Celts" of old (i.e. Gaels/Britons).

We can trace hints of these mysterious people and their culture back through known migrations, and it's certain that they originate in the Pontic-Caspian Steppe - i.e. Scythia. Hence the notion that the "Scots" are "Scythians" - there's some pan-European affiliation to a tribal mother known variously as "Scota", "Scathach", "Skathi" etc., which always accompanies groups associated with proto-Scythians.

I think most of the people researching this stuff would agree that we can trace the "root races" of Britain and Ireland (such as they are now) back to the West Asian Steppes. There's a common culture spread from what would eventually be Tartary in the east through eastern/south eastern Europe (Batls/Slavs, Thracians, Dacians), central Europe (Hallstatt-La Tène "Celts" and the Unetice/Bell Beaker cultures), through western Europe (Celtiberians, Aquitanians, Gauls, Belgae) and up into Britain/Ireland (Britons, Gaels, Picts, Cruthin). Same motifs, same art styles, same materials used in the same ways - often the same ways of burying the dead, related religions and languages (as far as we can work out at least). Even the real "Celts" - the Hallstatt/La Tène people of central Europe (note: no Briton or Gael would have called themselves "Celtic" before ~18th c.) - have been confirmed to have been led by a heavily organised, highly militaristic branch of Scythian nobility.

The fact that the ideas of "elves", "fairies", "aryans", and "Scots/Scyths/Scandinavians" (yes, that's the root of Scandinavia - "Skathidenauvia", literally "Scyth Island") all turn up together suggests that these threads do come from a common source. There are also similarities with native Siberian folk belief, the "shamanism" that might have been left in the wake of Tartaria's untimely exit from the world stage. I've long felt that there's an ancient and deep connection between Europe (esp. northern Europe) and Siberia, so none of this is a surprise to me!

Any more relevant info from your source? I don't have time to go through it all myself, but it seems like a good trove of information!
 

Ice Nine

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Celtic Animal Symbols: Horse

Trying to find some common elements between what is known about Celts and Druids and Tartars.

Celtic Animal Symbols: Horse
The horse has a long history with the Celtic people, and at times was a deity unto itself-perhaps even the first Celtic deity. Horses were associated by the Gauls with several gods and goddesses, and were emblems of the sun. The horse was a tremendously important animal to the Celtic tribes, and its domestication transformed the Celtic culture Horses were used for meat and milk and provided labor for farming and transportation, making for huge advances in hunting and war-making. The horse was so important to the Celts it was associated with the sun god, who often appeared as a horse with a human face.
The horse is also linked to a number of ancient war goddesses Perhaps the best-known horse deity of the Celts was the Goddess Epona (Gaulish, “mare”), the horse-mother, a favorite goddess of warriors who was so popular, she had the singular honor of becoming the only Celtic goddess worshiped within the borders of Rome.
TeutatesEntwined water horses, from a Pictish carving

The father-god Teutates often appears in art as a bearded horse, and one of the names of Im Dagda, “Eochaid,” means horse or horse-father. The triple war goddesses associated with sovereignty and kingship were closely associated with horses (as well as ravens), and the divinatory king-making ritual of the Druids involved a prophetic sleep sewn inside the skin of a sacrificial mare.
The tragic goddess Macha had shapeshifting ability, and one of her three aspects appears to have been a horse. The wife of Otherworld god Midir is Etain, whose aspect was originally equine.The Welsh worshipped a goddess similar to Epona, called Rhiannon, who could appear as a horse, and is the mother of Peredur, who became a legendary rider in Welsh tales (and later, a knight of the Round table.)
Horses also figure in Irish and Scottish fairy lore. Most notable is the Puka or Pooka horse, a dangerous fairy-creature who lures unwary travelers to their death. Another is the water-horse, a sort of mer-creature associated with the sea god Manannan Mac Lir.


And the Mongols/Tatars were great horsemen/women

Found some interesting horse related info about Tartarians, who were also called Mongols according to "Giovanni DiPlano Carpini in his "The story of the Mongols whom we call Tartars." (See the bibliography page) Carpini, who visited the Mongols at Pope Innocent IV's command between 1245-1247, was thus able to write from the unique position of being the first European to produce a firsthand report about the Mongols after their Great European campaign 1234-1242. On page 54, he observes: "Girls and women ride and gallop as skillfully as men. We even saw them carrying quivers and bows, and the women can ride horses for as long as the men; they have shorter stirrups, handle horses very well, and mind all the property. The Tartar (Erroneous term for Mongols, but often encountered) women make everything: skin clothes, shoes, leggings, and everything made of leather. They drive carts and repair them, they load camels, and are quick and vigorous in all their tasks. They all wear trousers, and some of them shoot just like men. "

anyway that is from a long winded article about Mongol/Tartar women.
Mongolian women
 
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sonoman

sonoman

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thanks Ice Nine, we seem to be going somewhere with the Tatarian mystery but I guess we must keep going in circles (kirk/church ELs) until we see some sort of pattern?

Originally it might have just referred to the manner of dress of the Tartarians, it didn't start out with any pattern at all, not as the plaids we think of today.
this part from that wiki seems to also 'fit' the grand cover up:
The Dress Act of 1746 attempted to bring the warrior clans under government control by banning the tartan and other aspects of Gaelic culture. When the law was repealed in 1782, it was no longer ordinary Highland dress, but was adopted instead as the symbolic national dress of Scotland.
as far as wiping out the traces/connections. a standard operating procedure so now we spot them from miles away.

hey welkyn, thank you also for chiming in.

Any more relevant info from your source? I don't have time to go through it all myself, but it seems like a good trove of information!
IMO the only correct Source is within but all these external re sources do help stir the inward One. I generally view outward info very suspiciously and actually this bibliotecapleyades.net even more so for whatever reason. but there is a mountain of in formations there. Ive only scratched the surface there but will post up anything I see going forward about it here.
 

jd755

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Well I have read the ark of the covenant by wilson and blackett which contains the tales of the mabinogi in it and my god i and number one son find it a hard slog to get into..i highly recommend watching alan wilson and baram blackett on the youtube or at richplanet.net.

any questions about the books content or the mabinogi tales i will happily do my best to answer using the book itself it just mght not be an immediate answer though.
might annoy the irish who believe the celtic stuff but acording to the authors the celts were never in ireland nor were they iin britain. furthermore st patrick, well there were two apparently, originally came from what is now called wales.
 
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sonoman

sonoman

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following a lead that trismegistus posted in the "Dragons and Vampires" thread I spotted this tidbit:

2019-01-19_165818.jpg


From Transylvania to Tunbridge Wells - The House of Vere: References

'Scotland and her Tartans'
amazon.com/Scotland-Her-Tartans-Alexander-Fulton/dp/0831777176/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Scotland+and+Her+Tartans&qid=1547961186&s=Books&sr=1-1-catcorr

"Clans and Families of Scotland: The History of the Scottish Tartan"
amazon.com/Clans-Families-Scotland-History-Scottish/dp/0785810501
 

Paracelsus

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I've been listening to quite a bit of "Fairy Tales" lately, only they're not very whimsical. It is various researchers theories on what is taking people out in the woods and the various accounts of Sasquatch, Wendigo, Djinn, M.I.B., Fleshgaits, and Skinwalkers. Perhaps people here are familiar with the phenomenon as reported by David Paulides, Steph Davis, Nick Redfern, David Weatherly.

Personally, I think the Scyths and those who spent their lives out in the wilderness became such fearsome conquerors because of what they faced out there. Mystical vision quests and hallucinogenic experiences became mental training for dealing with perceptual attacks from the beings of the wilderness.

Most Americans grew up in civilized society, within the strictest demarcation zones of cities. Probably by virtue of some sort of genetic compulsion to do so - virtually all do so without even knowing why. Here is my theory...

The woods and the mountains are wild areas, you know within your soul if you are allowed to be there. I didn't grow up in a city so I never had to learn how to feel and listen for sounds, to watch how shadows shift in the woods. There are eyes all around you, some are watching out for you, some merely watching, and others... they are the predators and demons from stories of our past. Historically, the Scythians and Celts are regarded as being wantonly and insatiably violent. Perhaps fighting the demons and beings of desolate and wild places made them that way. Not only that, in many stories, these beings alter time and space itself in places like Aokigahara, or Hoia Baciu forest, or even Crater Lake Oregon. Maybe those of Scythian/Celtic ancestry still remember what stalks the wilds. Sometimes a story is just a story, but, sometimes a story makes you remember something - something you can't explain.

I'm Scotch/Irish/Welsh/Northern-Italian/Cherokee; uncivilized blood courses through my veins. I love the woods and the wilds, I've felt the presence of the things that exist out there. Regard them as fairy tales at your own peril.
 
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sonoman

sonoman

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I dont actually know many 'fairy tales' but I know that if youre not wanted in the forests, you wont have a pleasant experience and if you are, its magic!

have many campfire stories, some are stories of the firesides. many hair raising, most in a great way. yes, wildlife is directly connected to The One divine intelligence.

She was a Nagha or Nixa and it is from her that Lilith, and all the ensuing Grail Maidens, including Sheba and Morgana of the Apple Trees, Tamaris, Mary Magdalene, the Princesses of Avallon, Melusine, Niniane and Ygraine owe their identifications as "Trees of Life". Consequently we can say that Tiamat, the first Tamaris - the Maiden who gives the Waters of Life - was also the Tir Mat or Tir Mata, the first "Tree Mother" of the Lords and Ladies of the Forest, the Druids and Druidesses - the People of the Trees (of Life)
 
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sonoman

sonoman

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Tartaria is a real as America. If you believe the good ol' US of A exists, then so does Tartaria.
seems simple enough.

Taxonomy - Wikipedia

what is a tax payer? "What is real?"

one of the most dangerous stunts anyone could pull. During the Spring Rut the Stag is vicious, belligerent and half mad with lust and territorial rage. Getting anywhere near him was a feat of courage in ’itself. However, to be rightly invested with the true kingship of the Forest Peoples, it was necessary first to depose the reigning monarch, the Great Stag
 
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