Interesting Timeline given by Diogenes Laertius...

Monkwee

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I'm currently reading Lives of the Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laertius [translated by R.D. Hicks in 1925] and there is some pretty interesting stuff throughout.

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I thought I'd share the opening passages:
  • There are those who say that the study of philosophy had its beginning among the barbarians. They urge that the Persians have had their Magi, the Babylonians or Assyrians their Chaldaeans, and the Indians their Gymnosophists ; and among the Celts and Gauls there are the people called the Druids or Holy Ones, for which they cite as authorities the Magicus of Aristotle and Sotion in the twenty-third book of his Succession of Philosophers. Also they say that Mochus was a Phoenician, Zamolxis a Thracian, and Atlas a Libyan.
  • If we may believe the Egyptians, Hephaestus was the son of the Nile, and with him philosophy began, priests and prophets being its chief exponents. Hephaestus lived 48,863 years before Alexander of Macedon, and in the interval there occurred 373 solar and 832 lunar eclipses.
  • But these authors forget that the achievements which they attribute to the barbarians belong to the Greeks, with whom not merely philosophy but the human race itself began. For instance, Musaeus is claimed by Athens, Linus by Thebes. It is said that the former, the son of Eumolpus, was the first to construct a geneaology of the gods and to construct a sphere, and that he maintained that all things proceed from unity and are resolved again into unity."
The three that are mentioned in the initial passage:

Mochus:
(from A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, Mochus and Mochus - Wikipedia )

(Μωχός) a native of Phoenicia, the author of a work on Phoenician history quoted by Athenaeus (iii. p. 126a). Strabo (xvi. p.757) speaks of one Mochus or Moschus (the reading varies) of Sidon, as the author of the atomic theory, and says that he was more ancient than the Trojan war. This statement he gives on the authority of Posidonius. It is impossible, of course, to tell from such a scanty notice whether he refers to the same person, or whether he really lived so early. It has generally been supposed that the Ochus mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (1.1) is the same person as the Mochus referred to by Athenaeus. Suidas also calls him Ochus; but he has evidently only copied the passage in Diogenes Laertius. But the mistake, if it is one, may easily have crept into the MSS. before his time. Josephus (J. AJ 1.8. s. 5) refers to Mochus, as do also Tatianus (ad v. Gent. p. 217) and Eusebius (Praep. Evanig. x. p. 289). (Fabric. Bilb. Graec. vol. i. p. 226, vol. iii. p. 807; Vossius, de Hist. Graec. p. 471, ed. Westermann.)

(Greek: Μωχός), also known as Mochus of Sidon and Mochus the Phoenician, is listed by Diogenes Laërtius along with Zalmoxis the Thracian and Atlas of Mauretania, as a proto-philosopher. Athenaeus claimed that he authored a work on the history of Phoenicia. Strabo, on the authority of Posidonius, speaks of one Mochus or Moschus of Sidon as the author of the atomic theory and says that he was more ancient than the Trojan war. He is also referred to by Josephus, Tatian, and Eusebius.

According to Robert Boyle, the father of modern chemistry, "‘Learned men attribute the devising of the atomical hypothesis to one Moschus a Phenician". Isaac Newton, Isaac Causabon, John Selden, Johannes Arcerius, Henry More, and Ralph Cudworth also credit Mochus of Sidon as the author of the atomic theory and some of them tried to identify Mochus with Moses the Israelite lawbringer.


Zamolxis: (from Zalmoxis)
Zalmoxis_Aleksandrovo.jpg

Herodotus asserts that Zalmoxis was originally a human being, a slave who converted the Thracians to his beliefs. The Greeks of the Hellespont and the Black Sea tell that Zalmoxis was a slave of Pythagoras, son of Mnesarchos, on the island of Samos. After being liberated, he gathered huge wealth and, once rich, went back to his homeland. Thracians lived simple hard lives. Zalmoxis had lived among the wisest of Greeks, such as Pythagoras, and had been initiated into Ionian life and the Eleusinian Mysteries. He built a banquet hall, and received the chiefs and his fellow countrymen at a banquet. He taught that neither his guests nor their descendants would ever die, but instead would go to a place where they would live forever in a complete happiness. He then dug an underground residence. When it was finished, he disappeared from Thrace, living for three years in his underground residence. The Thracians missed him and wept fearing him dead. The fourth year, he came back among them and thus they believed what Zalmoxis had told them.

Zalmoxis may have lived much earlier than Pythagoras and was rumored either to be a divine being or from the country of the Getae.

Scholars have several different theories about this account by Herodotus the disappearance and return of Zalmoxis:
  • Herodotus is mocking the barbarian beliefs of the Getae.
  • Zalmoxis created a ritual of passage. This theory is mainly supported by Mircea Eliade, who wrote the first coherent interpretation of the Zalmoxis myth.
  • Zalmoxis is related to Pythagoras, stating that he founded a mystical cult. This theory may be found in Eliade's work.
  • Zalmoxis is a Christ-like figure who dies and is resurrected. This position was defended by Jean (Ioan) Coman, a professor of patristics and Orthodox priest, who was a friend of Mircea Eliade and published in Eliade's journal Zalmoxis, which appeared in the 1930s.[citation needed]
This last theory precisely parallels the legend of the universal king Frode given in both Ynglingsaga and Gesta Danorum of Saxo Grammaticus, particularly Ynglingsaga 12 and Saxo 5.16.3, in which Frode disappears into the earth for three years after his death.

It is difficult to define the time when a cult to Zalmoxis may have existed. It is only certain that it antecedes Herodotus. Some scholars have suggested that the archaic doctrine of Zalmoxis points to a heritage from before the times of Indo-Europeans, but this is difficult, if not impossible, to demonstrate.[5]

Plato says in the dialogue Charmides (lines 156 D – 157 B) that Zalmoxis was also a great physician who took a holistic approach to healing body and soul (psyche), being thus used by Plato for his own philosophical conceptions.

Atlas: (from Atlas)
atlascelestialsphere.jpg

In his Histories, IV, 184, Herodotus mentions a Mount Atlas so high and so cloudy at the top at all times that it is impossible to see its summit, and that the local residents, called Atlantes, present as the pillar on which the heavens rest. He adds that these so-called Atlantes are the last people whose name he knows along the westbound road from Libya to the Pillars of Heracles (the westernmost boundary of the world known to the Greeks), and he is the first writer known to us to use the name "Atlantic Ocean" for the sea past the Pillars of Heracles (Histories, I, 202). Herodotus doesn't mention the hero Atlas in his description of the Libyan mountain, but the way the story is told, with the mention of that mountain sustaining the heavens, does everything to suggests that he is implicitely offering a "rationalistic" explanation of the legend.

Plato mentions Atlas in the Phædo, 99c, in the context of Socrates' intellectual autobiography and disappointment with Anaxagoras and the physicists who think they can "come up with a stronger and more immortal Atlas more capable of holding all things together". But Atlas is above all, in Plato, the one who gives his name to Atlantis, the mythical island Critias opposes to Athens in the tale he develops in the dialogue that bears his name (see Critias, 114a, where Atlas is presented as Poseidon's first born son and the first king of Atlantis, giving it and the surrounding Atlantic Ocean his name).

Plato may have had the above mentioned passage of Herodotus in mind when devising his myth of Atlantis. And his transformation of the country of Atlas into "an island larger than Libya and Asia combined" (Timæus, 24e) may well be a veiled allusion to Alcibiades' dream of conquest, as suggested by Socrates at Alcibiades, 105a-c and more clearly described by Thucydides in his Histories, VI, 15, 2, when introducing Alcibiades answer to Nicias in the assembly, and again at Histories, VI, 90, 2, from the mouth of Alcibiades himself talking to the Spartans after he had fled there to escape prosecution by Athens in relation with the affairs of the Herms and mysteries.

The island of Sicily, that was to be in Alcibiades dream the first step of a conquest of the whole western world, has now assumed gigantic proportions, growing larger than Libya and Asia combined : Libya, the country in which Carthage was located and whose limit Mount Atlas marked in Herodotus' geography ; and Asia, the country of the kings (the Persian kings) Alcibiades wanted so dearly to surpass. It has moved passed the limits of the world Alcibiades wanted to conquer, as if to tell him that there is no end to such dreams of conquest and to the world at hand, and taken over the name of what was only for Herodotus the beginning of the unexplored world (Histories, IV, 185).

And so, in pretending to give life to Socrates' dream of animating the city of the Republic (see Timæus, 19c and 26c-d), Critias may only be in fact giving mythical proportion to the (failed) dream of Alcibiades, supposed to have come true in a remote past, as a foundation for a renewed Athenian imperialism... Thus, in such a reading, Alcibiades and Critias, who respectively open and close the initial tetralogy as interlocutors of Socrates (Alcibiades in the dialogue that bears his name, Critias as lead speaker in the Charmides), subtly join forces in the concluding trilogy to try one last time to defuse Socrates ideal before being shut up at the center of this trilogy by Plato's interruption of the Critias as a "trial (krisis)" of the reader at the end of his journey through the dialogues : there are now those who pursue the dream of a mythical Atlantis that never existed outside Critias' speech and Plato's mind, and spend the rest of their lives looking for its "material" location or dreaming of a golden age that never was, those who imitate Critias and devise "myths" to fool the crowds into following them in their hazardous undertakings that are only meant to further their own power, and those who are willing to follow Plato along the sunny slopes of Mount Ida and proceed to the Laws to find there an example of what they should do here and now in their real world to answer the call of Zeus.
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Pretty interesting stuff to go on tangents with. It's taken me over two hours to draft this due to all the side reading and links i've followed! I'd love to hear your thoughts on this stuff!

Cheers and well-wishes.
 

mythstifieD

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IN THE SECOND CHAPTER we analyze the famous books of three "antique" authors, who left us the life stories of the famous philosopher Pythagor. It appeared that Pythagor was also identified with the god Apollo. The issue is about the "antique" works Iamblichus of Chalcis, Diogenes Laertius and Porphyrius.
The biggest text about Pythagor was written by Iamblichus and is called "The life of Pythagor "or "About the Pythagorian way of life". It is considered that Pythagor lived much earlier than Apollonius of Tiana, that is in the VI century B.C., and writing about his life Iamblichus of Chalcis - around 242-306 A.D. Based on the new chronology we found out that the book of Iamblichus – this is one more lost Gospel, telling about Andronicus-Christ. So, the work of Iamblichus was made not earlier the XIV-XV centuries, and edited later. The same is regarding "antique" works of Diogenes Laertius and Porphyrius.
So, it appears that "very antique" Pythagor – this is one more phantom reflection of Andronicus-Christ.
At quick reading of the works of Philostratus, Iamblichus, Diogenes and Porphyrius it may seem that they are far from Gospels. But the New Chronology unexpectedly helps to find out and identify their contents with the known to us plots from the canonical Gospels. After we managed to single out from the indicated "antique" books nearly all the main contents of the Gospels, it appeared that many things, which are missing in the canonized New Testament, remained in them. Moreover, they are not described in so called Apocrypha, telling about Christ. So we managed to find a lot of new and rather interesting data about Andronicus-Christ, which was earlier hidden under a thick layer of "concrete" of the Scaligerian version of history.
Here is, for example, a list of those plots from the canonic Gospels, which were found by us in "The life of Apollonius of Tiana" of Flavius Philostratus and described in details in the first chapter of our book.
# Virgin birth.
# Annunciation.
# Christmas.
# Star of Bethlehem.
# Christ – the God's son.
# Arrival of Magi and their worship to Jesus. The gifts of Magi. This plot is twice described by Philostratus.
# Angry tsar Herod wants to make away with Jesus.
# Beating of the infants at the order of Herod.
# Runaway of the Holy Family to Egypt.
# John the Baptist and Baptism of Christ by him in the river Jordan.
# Adultery of tsar Herod and Herodias. Condemnation of him by John the Baptist.
# Punishment of John the Baptist.
# Levi Matthew, a former publican, and then apostle and evangelist.
# A success of young Christ in studies and his knowledge, which surprises the bookmen.
# A punishment of a boy, who offended Jesus (a plot from Apocrypha).
# A simple look of Christ and his decent way of life.
# A virginity of Christ.
# Long wanderings of Christ at far lands. Then – return to Jerusalem. The folks joyfully meet Christ and ask him for help, advice, curing.
# A temptation of Christ by the devil in the desert. The Lent of Christ.
# Christ is a prophet, speaks much with people, judges, talks, helps, cures.
# A miracle of walking by the water of Christ.
# Exorcism by Christ by means of pigs.
# Christ condemns a depravity of morals in a church.
# A growing anger of the bookmen and Pharisees against Christ.
# Curing of the possessed, expulsion of the bad fairy from a young man. This plot was repeated by Philostratus three times.
# Greedy Judas Iscariot plays full with Christ. A topic of money sounds: payment and purchase-sale.
# Arrest of Christ. Questioning by Pontius Pilate. This plot is repeated twice.
# Pilate unsuccessfully wants to dismiss Christ.
# Pontius Pilate washes his hands in front of the crowd.
# Punishment of Christ.
# A sun eclipse, connected with the crucifixion of Christ.
# The Resurrection and Ascension of Christ. Is described twice.
# An angel, seating on the hearse cover of Christ after his Resurrection.

LOST GOSPELS.
Sorry for the quote reply but I couldn't help but notice a lot of these names come up in my research of Fomenko.
 
OP
Monkwee

Monkwee

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IN THE SECOND CHAPTER we analyze the famous books of three "antique" authors, who left us the life stories of the famous philosopher Pythagor. It appeared that Pythagor was also identified with the god Apollo. The issue is about the "antique" works Iamblichus of Chalcis, Diogenes Laertius and Porphyrius.
The biggest text about Pythagor was written by Iamblichus and is called "The life of Pythagor "or "About the Pythagorian way of life". It is considered that Pythagor lived much earlier than Apollonius of Tiana, that is in the VI century B.C., and writing about his life Iamblichus of Chalcis - around 242-306 A.D. Based on the new chronology we found out that the book of Iamblichus – this is one more lost Gospel, telling about Andronicus-Christ. So, the work of Iamblichus was made not earlier the XIV-XV centuries, and edited later. The same is regarding "antique" works of Diogenes Laertius and Porphyrius.
So, it appears that "very antique" Pythagor – this is one more phantom reflection of Andronicus-Christ.
At quick reading of the works of Philostratus, Iamblichus, Diogenes and Porphyrius it may seem that they are far from Gospels. But the New Chronology unexpectedly helps to find out and identify their contents with the known to us plots from the canonical Gospels. After we managed to single out from the indicated "antique" books nearly all the main contents of the Gospels, it appeared that many things, which are missing in the canonized New Testament, remained in them. Moreover, they are not described in so called Apocrypha, telling about Christ. So we managed to find a lot of new and rather interesting data about Andronicus-Christ, which was earlier hidden under a thick layer of "concrete" of the Scaligerian version of history.
Here is, for example, a list of those plots from the canonic Gospels, which were found by us in "The life of Apollonius of Tiana" of Flavius Philostratus and described in details in the first chapter of our book.
# Virgin birth.
# Annunciation.
# Christmas.
# Star of Bethlehem.
# Christ – the God's son.
# Arrival of Magi and their worship to Jesus. The gifts of Magi. This plot is twice described by Philostratus.
# Angry tsar Herod wants to make away with Jesus.
# Beating of the infants at the order of Herod.
# Runaway of the Holy Family to Egypt.
# John the Baptist and Baptism of Christ by him in the river Jordan.
# Adultery of tsar Herod and Herodias. Condemnation of him by John the Baptist.
# Punishment of John the Baptist.
# Levi Matthew, a former publican, and then apostle and evangelist.
# A success of young Christ in studies and his knowledge, which surprises the bookmen.
# A punishment of a boy, who offended Jesus (a plot from Apocrypha).
# A simple look of Christ and his decent way of life.
# A virginity of Christ.
# Long wanderings of Christ at far lands. Then – return to Jerusalem. The folks joyfully meet Christ and ask him for help, advice, curing.
# A temptation of Christ by the devil in the desert. The Lent of Christ.
# Christ is a prophet, speaks much with people, judges, talks, helps, cures.
# A miracle of walking by the water of Christ.
# Exorcism by Christ by means of pigs.
# Christ condemns a depravity of morals in a church.
# A growing anger of the bookmen and Pharisees against Christ.
# Curing of the possessed, expulsion of the bad fairy from a young man. This plot was repeated by Philostratus three times.
# Greedy Judas Iscariot plays full with Christ. A topic of money sounds: payment and purchase-sale.
# Arrest of Christ. Questioning by Pontius Pilate. This plot is repeated twice.
# Pilate unsuccessfully wants to dismiss Christ.
# Pontius Pilate washes his hands in front of the crowd.
# Punishment of Christ.
# A sun eclipse, connected with the crucifixion of Christ.
# The Resurrection and Ascension of Christ. Is described twice.
# An angel, seating on the hearse cover of Christ after his Resurrection.

LOST GOSPELS.
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Sorry for the quote reply but I couldn't help but notice a lot of these names come up in my research of Fomenko.
Not at all, this is awesome! Thank you for sharing this link! I've been wanting to begin reading this guy and this is the perfect introduction! Thanks again!
 

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