Hieronymus Bosch

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
496
Reactions
1,610
Another one of those mysterious historical people, said to have been great at something.

Nothing is known of his life. I would say because he never existed.

Only 2 images of him, considering the suposed amazing artists available, this is all we have?

250px-Jheronimus_Bosch_(cropped).jpg
hieronymus-bosch.jpg!Portrait.jpg

What drew me to Bosch is this painting 'The garden of earthly delights' Said to have been made between 1490 and 1510, when Bosch was between 40 and 60 years old (We don't have a clue)

Schwartz-ClickHeretoVisitHell.jpg

This painting, said to be 'early netherlandish reneissance' and is full of the topics we discuss here. There are also elements which we read and view in modern day 'fiction'. This for example looks like it was an inspiration for The Matrix.

IMG_20190414_091039.jpg

The outer cover of the tryptict painting depicts the fledgling earth, perhaps on day 3 if we believe wacki. It also follows the flat earth, dome idea.

220px-Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_-_The_exterior_(shutters).jpg

Would love to know how and why these people get and dates attributed to such works. This painting could be any age.

There is a twitter feed with posts cropped parts of the painting. Take a look at BoschBot @boschbot

Would love to hear other site members views on this painting its contents and the mysterious Hieronymus Bosch and the reasons for his invention & painting attribution.

Cheers
 
Last edited:

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
937
Reactions
2,501
Well you did ask
Here is a humongous image of the 'painting': Link

I get the feeling whoever created this picture is european as the depictions of of european birds are very accurate.

The central picture;
The accurate depictions of birds and animals from all parts of the world save Australia is impressive.
No insects depicted and few reptiles.
Other than the narwhal no sea mammals.

The fruits seem to be a mix of real fruit and fantasy fruit. No recognisable plants, thistle being only one. The trees are all fantasy trees.

The people are mainly androgenus. No black haired people to be seen. No brown skinned people to be seen. A few grey people maybe ill or dying?
Many people are looking directly at the viewer.
Seems to depict everyone as fruit eaters.
No death no birth anywhere I could see.
No children or babies.
No overt sexuality, no sex acts being performed only hinted at.
Women holding rounded bellies suggesting pregnancy.
Not a strand of pubic hair anywhere. No beards on the men
No religious symbology I could recognise save an upturned crescent.
Disguised male and female genitalia in and on the towers.
No fat people, no thin people they all look remarkably similar.

Left panel;
Death is in this picture.
Birds attacking a lizard bottom left.
Seal climbing out of the water.
Frog on the back of a fantasy creature.
A cat with a lizard in it's mouth.
Birds eating frogs.
Cat eating a dead antelope.
An excellent face of a froghopper.
The bloke in pink robes seems to be to have been added later.
The symbology is made to look like god in the garden of eden admonishing eve but where's the talking snake?
That hand signal has meaning for sure just no idea what.
God has a five o'clock shadow!
What is made to appear as the 'tree of knowledge' is a yucca of some sort. Cannot remember its name.
The white swan is a mute swan. Just to its right is a horseshoe crab and above it is an upside down snake (the one who blabbed maybe?).
The shape made by the flock of swallows is suggestive of something I cannot put my finger on.
The crescent makes an appearance again.
No other 'religious' symbolism.

Right panel;
Human death in this one.
The pig dressed, sort of, as a nun bearing a pen and ink (cockney rhyming slang for stink!) and the written word on the thighs of the man bearing the twin red seals of 'authority' are very, very striking to me. Showing how disconnected man has become from god and lost in the hell of religion.
The particular upturned playing cards feel to me to be a code of some kind.
Knife through the hand alludes to the crucifixion of christ as told by religion.
The part severed blinded head is suggestive of no matter how much religion tries to insert itself between man and god it cannot. We are god, we are of god wake up. Blinded so as not to see the illusions of religion.
The 'roman' four with the line through it scratched on the table alludes to the fourth stage/age of man?
The two 'armoured' dogs eating and killing the man whose 'last breath' is leaving him allude to the 'dogs of war' driven by, run by religion killing The body but having no effect on the soul, the real 'me'.
The severed hand in the blue thing on the back of the rat in a dress killing the man holding a die with the 3 5 and 1 visible feels 'code like' to me and the knife through the hand another symbol of crucifixion.
The upside down torso has fire coming out of it and the lady behind the table is holding a pitcher and a 'roman candle' type firework did she kill the upside down figure with it?
The souls in hell are being crapped on and spewed upon presumably by the crazy looking righteous.
The dead lady sitting to the left of the 'hell hole' has a toad o frog symbol I recognise from somewhere on her chest and she is being grasped by tree roots alluding to the supposedly 'pagan' green man who is the thing that reclaims all worldly goods in the end even bodies.
The die on pitcher lady's head is another cod 4 5 and 2.
Three die on a backgammon table, yet more code.
The bird figure eating a body and crapping the souls into 'hell' is a depiction of the devil or possibly the 'grim reaper'. The black birds and cloud of fart, one presumes, flying out of their backside recalls to mind the nursery rhyme 'four and twenty blackbirds'. Don't know why.
Just behind the throne is a gaggle of nuns or at least ladies with their hair covered and an androgenus head wearing some sort of headgear topped with another crescent. Two of the nuns sport one half of a pair of horns. Religion is the devil is what it says to me.

The band and the singers have gone batshit crazy. There is a snake coming out of the lyre, demons are driving the singers who are singing the music printed onto someone's backside, the turtle on the lyre has been killed by an arrow and is on fire, for some reason. The pink robed body with a strange head and hat is, to me at least, a merchant in commerce, the god we all follow today unwittingly or not, aka the wrong one.
A demon rat or raccoon is banging the bottom of the drum. The beat goes on springs to mind, I don't know why.
The poor bugger with a flute up his arse is to me alluding to the way in which we work ourselves quite literally to death as in the saying 'okay I'll stick a brush up my arse and clean the floor as well' that deals with the oppressive tasks being handed out by authority (maybe a British thing but there it is).
He is also holding up an impressive instrument into which a 'muslim devil' is blowing. I say muslim because of the head gear and the crescent and the flag.
More crucifixion symbology on the neck of the lyre with 'christ' held by demons and 'christ's followers' looking on , doing nothing to save 'christ' note just gawping.
The 'nun' clanging the triangle and the 'eiffel tower' above her are connected but don't know why.
The seated blue robed figure backed by spoonbill headed 'monk robed' figures is reading from a book and has the classic 'wicked witch' nose so presumably it is a book of spells. Which to me says that all books are spells created to hold us in the illusion of religion.

The spurred white gowned monk riding on the most buxom woman depicted anywhere in these panels and bridled to boot, is very significant to me as the way in which 'men of god' treat women, in other words how far removed they have become from what they truly are.

There's that frog/toad again in the flag of the armoured knight being consumed by the seven fantasy creatures still holding a 'golden chalice' and a wispy end of the banner. Balanced on a knife edge no less. How apt.

The big white face is the same one as the one on the pink robed man in the left panel.Inside his torso there are three men sat at a table, sat on a frog, watching television. The horny one is there emptying the last dregs from the barrel to keep the three from waking up, pissed as they are.
The ghost of a crossbow hangs above them, don't know why.

The sideways on S shape on the key is of significance for reasons I know not. It's prominence in the picture is what suggests this to me.
Why a white flag with red bagpipes on is flying alongside is beyond me as is the significance of the big red bagpipes.
Clothed women leading naked men in a circle however is symbolic of something, cannot recall what.
The one in blue with the 'white beard' and halo comes across as the virgin mary for some reason.
The green demon pointing alongside the naked man riding some animal is symbolic of those who call for war but don't do any physical killing aka the politicians, the merchants, the religious, the righteous, the just. Note also the robed bird headed figure following reminds me of chaplains in uniform for some reason.
The naked man behind is being 'encouraged' by various clothed figures to go and fight.
And they are being led by a flag. What is it about bloody flags that people wrap themselves in them, follow the, believe them to be symbolic of a nation, symbolic of who and what they are, I don't get it other than the flag is a blind put out to stop people knowing who they are. There is no conquering without dividing and that is how the Roman Catholic Church and its creators do it.

Interesting that the 'fires of hell' are taking the place the religionistas tell us is occupied by heaven.
The symbol on the massive knife dividing the 'heart' or the 'ears' is of significance but yet again I cannot recall where I've seen it before.

The windmill in hell is a nice comic touch as is the watermill wheel. The rig of the boat is as good an indicator of the probable time it was painted as it is very accurate and very specific, sadly beyond my knowing.
The eye of sauron also gets a look it its the thing that looks like the moon trapped by two pillars of rock.

Well that was interesting, thanks Timeshifter.
Reminds me of my grammar school days which I shared with a lad who produced very similar looking artwork. No idea if he knew of Bosch but it looks eerily similar to the minds recall of this lads work.
He went on in life after school to do something called Star Wars.
 
Last edited:

Mabzynn

Well-known member
Messages
165
Reactions
699
I see he has a few different names attributed to him from literature in the 1800's. Hieronymus Bos and Hieronymus Agnen.

Pretty weird art regardless

20240


20241


20242

I find it strange that there's such a variety of wildlife and racial types but I see no depictions of Asian people.
 
Last edited:

tupperaware

Well-known member
Messages
246
Reactions
672
The large plant/succulent in the left pane appears to be the tree of knowledge since there is an owl at the base in a hole. Maybe the owl is just confused. The owl definitely represents knowledge.

There are a few glass cylinders at the base of this tree of knowledge that appear much more frequently in the middle pane and not at all in the far right apocalyptic pane. The glass cylinders and other glass objects seem to be means of transferring characteristics from animals to people in the middle pane. This pane is referring to a transmutation of mankind after ejection from Eden into fallen mankind in the right pane.

The same type of tree is shown in the middle pane larger with glass cylinders now penetrating the tree.

One image, middle pane shows a rat in a glass cylinder moving towards a man.

In the middle pane there is an already transformed aquatic sentient species delivering fruit from a tree of knowledge/life to people and animals. They nowhere are eating the fruit.

There are vestiges of an old and dead civilization in the first pane.

One thing definitely out of place in the first pane is a platypus aquatic creature in a pond reading a book which implies previous knowledge from the dead civilization.

The full range of races are shown from black to brown to white and in this snip are shown what appear to be South American Indians or Asians.

20249


20251


Here is one of the grey races shown in the middle pane and an insect/butteryfly raven hybrid getting him to climb a ladder.

20255
 
Last edited:

EdwinJohnson

Member
Messages
21
Reactions
84
I've long wondered about this painting. I'm amazed that such a thing has survived to our time. I have a gut feeling that our true history is being hinted at in this work.

The center panel appears to provide some clues to the meaning of Genesis 2:16:

"And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat"

Is this passage really talking about literal trees? and what is really meant by "freely eat"? In the painting many people have fruit on their heads or are holding fruit in their hands. Perhaps they are the "trees" that God permitted Adam to "eat" from, that is, engage in sexual activity with. The painting is very sexual. And we know from other parts of the bible that "eat" and "fruit" are euphemisms for sex.

But what about Genesis 2:17:

"But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die."

I don't really see any bad tree or any obvious hint of taboo or prohibition in the painting... However, the black people are painted extremely dark... Don't want to be racist, but maybe Bosch was trying to show the original sin was that the Adamic race mixed with some other race or humanoids that they were not supposed to mix with, despite having total sexual freedom otherwise.

The painting also raises a lot of questions since it doesn't match the biblical account. In the Bible it's just Adam and Eve and a serpent in Eden... not a huge orgy. Some commentators have said the middle panel is depicting the time after the "Fall" or after the "original sin" of Adam and Eve, but that doesn't match the Bible since it says that after the Fall they were ashamed of their nakedness and sewed fig leaves to cover themselves and also that God also gave them garments of skin! That doesn't fit at all with the painting of a bunch of naked people frolicking. But then if the middle panel is before the Fall, we still have another problem. According to the Bible, Eve is not reported to have had any children prior to the Fall. How can paradise be so well populated then in Bosch's painting? This work seems to contradict the Bible and also the ideas of the church writers who often assert that there was no sex before the Fall of Man.

I find it very fascinating that the painting has different races portrayed yet in the left panel Adam and Eve are white. Where did the other races come from? The Biblical account suggests the races such as the Hamites didn't exist until after Noah's flood.

Seems that Bosch is either deliberately going against the biblical account, or perhaps working with a different version of biblical history that no longer exists. Perhaps in his version, the white race was the focus of God's narrative and Adam and Eve were not really the first people, but simply the first white people. Perhaps in his view, the forbidden fruit was mixing with some other race or races that coexisted with the first white peoples. Not trying to be mean racist, but just looking at things possibly implied by the painting.

bosch black.jpg
 

tupperaware

Well-known member
Messages
246
Reactions
672
Adam and Eve (shown again in pane 2 lower left and first image below) might have been ashamed of their nakedness initially. Bosch was thinking in pane 2 it did not take long before some fish creatures from upriver arrived bearing strange fruity gifts and perhaps the pods too and before you know it Adam and Eve realized their shame of nakedness was holding them back. With so much fruity knowledge available man becomes self absorbed and lazy. Justification for this interpretation is there is always Eden, The Fall, and then Purgatory in sequence. There is no reason to have two panes of Eden then straight into Hell. That's just not fair.

I think the interpretation is self absorption and hedonism is the road straight to Hell in Bosch's mind or at least in the mind of the patron for this painting.

20288


20282


20283


20284

Pod incubators all over this pane filled with one or more people.

20286

Pane three shows quite a few human animal chimeras taken out their anger on those lazy Postedenites.

20285
 
Last edited:

EdwinJohnson

Member
Messages
21
Reactions
84
Adam and Eve (shown again in pane 2 lower left and first image below) might have been ashamed of their nakedness initially. Bosch was thinking in pane 2 it did not take long before some fish creatures from upriver arrived bearing strange fruity gifts and perhaps the pods too and before you know it Adam and Eve realized their shame of nakedness was holding them back. With so much fruity knowledge available man becomes self absorbed and lazy. Justification for this interpretation is there is always Eden, The Fall, and then Purgatory in sequence. There is no reason to have two panes of Eden then straight into Hell. That's just not fair.

I think the interpretation is self absorption and hedonism is the road straight to Hell in Bosch's mind or at least in the mind of the patron for this painting.
I'm no art expert or anything but it does look like the first two panes are depicting Eden. They look pretty similar. If the second panel is depicting the event of The Fall it's very strange that there is no serpent tempting Eve and that there are so many naked humans. If it's depicting life after The Fall or the Fallen world, it's also weird since they are not wearing clothes.

What you are thinking of is clearly depicted in Bosch's Haywain Triptych: Link
but, The Garden of Earthly Delights seems to go against the norm. Seems to clash with the scriptural version of the story. Look at how strikingly different the middle panel is from the Haywain.
 

tupperaware

Well-known member
Messages
246
Reactions
672
I'm no art expert or anything but it does look like the first two panes are depicting Eden. They look pretty similar. If the second panel is depicting the event of The Fall it's very strange that there is no serpent tempting Eve and that there are so many naked humans. If it's depicting life after The Fall or the Fallen world, it's also weird since they are not wearing clothes.

What you are thinking of is clearly depicted in Bosch's Haywain Triptych: Link
but, The Garden of Earthly Delights seems to go against the norm. Seems to clash with the scriptural version of the story. Look at how strikingly different the middle panel is from the Haywain.
The Haywain was painted later supposedly but is nowhere near as good in painting technique as "Delight". Here is a mainstream light review that thinks the middle pane of "Delight" is the lived panel and the left and right, created and failed. 15 Facts You Need to Know About the Delightfully Weird 'Garden of Earthly Delights' That's just one interpretation of course.

The painting was hugely popular with many copies and tapestries made. Strange there is no information on the painter.
 

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
937
Reactions
2,501
After a good nights sleep it appears to me I am looking at propaganda.
It is interesting that it is being interpreted as being religious, hell even I did that without realising, must have been 'cos 'twas the sabbath.
It is also interesting, to me at least, to see the programing of religion at work. The eyes see things on the screen (originally the actual picture of course), colours and shapes, the brain built to recognise pattern sees patterns, the programed, by contemporaneous society, brain transforms the patterns into silent words (birds man woman platypus etc) and the church's bible stories program injected at a very young age transforms them into how bad man is and how unattainable the former idyllic state of Eden is and bingo it has magickally inserted itself between man and god. The original 'Go between'.

What follows is just me writing out loud. I'm not having go at anyone so if you are easily offended don't read any further on.

The garden of eden tale has everything in it to keep people who hear it from looking in to it. Eden is made to appear synonymous with heaven made by god for man to live in.
So god puts man in the garden. Man in the species sense so too speak.
Then man gets bored with heaven so god gives him wo man to stop him being bored. Why didn't god do the decent thing right there and scrap man?
So wo man appears (again no mother involved just god inventing her as he did man) and all is heavenly again. Then somehow a snake fluent in whatever language man, wo man and god uses, appears and whispers in wo mans ear and points out tree he hadn't noticed.
Why wo mans ear why not man's ear. Why wait for wo man to appear. why not whisper it when man was there by himself?
What has the power to create a talking snake in heaven without the creator of heaven being aware of such a thing and have it programmed to talk to the curvy one not the angular one and corrupt her, not him?

So woman corrupts heaven is the story ergo man cannot trust woman and god doesn't either because woman got the worst of it.
That's to me is why the man in pink is holding her hand why she is kneeling, why she looks contrite, why all the women in the right panel are leading men astray.
It also suggests why the fantasy 'trees' producing 'fruit from the earth' are pink. They are god in non human form and finally why is god always depicted as man and not woman?
Could it be that when all this propaganda appeared that was the prevailing state of play 'in society'?
Kinda feels like it to me. I'll lay odds that whoever painted this work, whoever commissioned it whenever there is to be found a Jesuit or two and the Roman Catholic Church.

It is impossible for little me to comprehend this tale, I need someone to do it for me. In jumps Religion, the creator of the tale to do it for me...as long as I comply with its commercial rules!
 

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
937
Reactions
2,501
I have no idea why but this face says to me "I am the artist".
artist.png


The 'platypus' mentioned above is another indication of pattern recognition. Here it is cropped out of the big picture.

platy.png


What I see is a figure with no lower body or one hidden by the large fish underneath it, facing away from the viewer. This figure is wearing a black hooded cloak, jacket or coat and has a ducks bill pointing out from under the hood and is holding an open book in its hands with its uncovered left arm visible. The arm looks kind of greyish but is muscular not a skeleton arm.
The figure is facing towards the 'admonishment scene' on the left.
Well a couple of things jump out. Jesuits wore black hooded clobber. The open book is a bible. The interpretation of a prompter in a stage play comes to mind.
Is it an original version of what is called today an 'easter egg' in software games where the artist is actually saying who and what is behind this propaganda?
Post automatically merged:

Well that didn't take long!
From here Hieronymus
Hieronymus (ˌhaɪəˈrɒnɪməs)
n
(Biography) Eusebius (juːˈsiːbɪəs). the Latin name of Saint Jerome. See Jerome1

Hieronymus - (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian Church whose major work was his translation of the Scriptures from Hebrew and Greek into Latin (which became the Vulgate); a saint and Doctor of the Church (347-420)
They even have a picture of him. How amazing is that!

69EFE-hieronymus.png


Now to the bloke himself, the artist bloke, the Dutchman.
Doubledutch is a word used when someone here (Britain) cannot understand what someone else is saying. "It's all Greek to me" is another. Probably not relevant but there it is.

Well, well, well as ever with these 'historical characters Hieronymus wasn't his 'real name'.
From here Hieronymous Bosch - The Complete Works - hieronymus-bosch.org
WARNING you get bombarded for 'giftcard sign ups' on that site
Hieronymus Bosch, born Jeroen Anthonissen van Aken.

Just as a general observation from being on this site for a few months, it appears to me that the fakers are a bit of a one trick pony outfit. The 'history they fake' all follows the same pattern. Invent a name, give the name a book, event, painting, sculpture, invention etc then give out the fictious names 'real name' and the 'real names' fake background as evidence of the name actually being attached to a living being.

Anyhow that site has all his pictures to have a peruse through if one is so moved.
I then went searching using his 'real name'.
Of course up popped waki dominating the search results, quelle surprise, the Dutch waki site all about his father even has a handy family tree on it Anthonis van Aken - Wikipedia

So more is known of the fathers life than the sons even though his father is not the 'famous one', hmm.

The Dutch waki page for Jeroen carries the same family tree and is chock full of supposition and presumption aka 'gap filling'.
Example being
In the 1480-1481 financial year, Bosch is called "Jeroen die maelre" in an account, so he started his career no later than that. Two years earlier, in 1478, his father died. Jheronimus and his brother Goessen will probably continue the family studio.

An interesting 'other name' for Bosch popped up in that quote "Jeroen die maelre" so dropping that into giburu brought me this page Jeroen Bosch - Biografie in Dutch so nipped over to my 'trusty' google translate to help.

Who is rather more honest than the other site bearing all his pictures whose author simply copied waki's take. Mind a lot of stuff on this Dutch site predates waki, yes some sites did exist before the all knowing waki appeared.
Here's the translation;

Biography Jeroen Bosch 1450-1516
Little is known about the life of Jeroen Bosch,so we do not know much and that what we often do not know for sure.

Jeroen Bosch was born in the Middle Ages,the time between classical antiquity and the Renaissance Bosch lived in the turbulent world of the "autumn tide of the Middle Ages" (late Middle Ages),the eve of the Reformation.

Jeroen Bosch was born the son of a painter Anthonius van Aken. He was probably born around 1450 in "s-Hertogenbosch. Only his year of death is fixed at 1516.His grandfather Jan van Aken and his brother and three uncles were also painters. So he comes from a painter's family.
He probably received his education in the family studio located on the Bossche Markt.
Jeroen Bosch was more of an artist than a painter alone.

Bosch's actual family name was van Aken. He signed his work with Bosch, because he was born in 's-Hertogenbosch and lived there for most of his life.
In Spain he is called El Bosco and here also Jeroen de Maelre.
He was married to Aleite Vander Meervenne, a descendant from a rich line of merchants.

He was also a member of the elitist and devout Illustrious Lady Brotherhood, a conservative religious group in 's-Hertogenbosch. Already during his life he became famous and was held in high regard.

The exact date of death of Bosch is unknown but he was buried in St.Jan on August 9, 1516. Jeroen Bosch is one of the most enigmatic Dutch painters.Not only because little is known about his life.


So out of that I get a few things.
First there is lot of 'probably' in that biography.
He lived in a family of painters.
He married a merchants daughter?
He was a religious conservative.


Following the religious connection first, the Illustrious Lady Brotherhood, in Dutch Lieve Vrouwe Broederschap.

From this site, translated by google Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Broederschap - BHIC
In 2009, part of the archive of the Illustrious Lady Brotherhood was scanned. So you can browse through the originals on the internet. You can also search the accounts and weapon books for names that appear in them.

For those interest in the heraldic connections; BHIC
The Brotherhoods Coat of Arms contains the family arms of the sworn brothers, from 1318 to the present.

All the names Wapenboeken Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Broederschap - BHIC
The accounts from 1329 to 1620 contain the financial statement by the cheers. What is interesting about these accounts is that this means that everyone who is registered with the Brotherhood also appears in the accounts. The cheers noted the names of the members because of the financial obligations (entry fee, death debt).

"Death debt" eh, sounds very much like 'modern day' death duties. Indeed duty and debt are synonymous as far as I can tell. It's a very religious thing to me, getting the dead to pay debts, which of course they cannot ever do.
Mind remember this is the crew the painter/artist of many names was hanging with according to the evidence above.

The index on the accounts BHIC
Because the accounts are an interesting genealogical source through the name listings (was my ancestor a member of the Brotherhood?), A registered index has been created, so that you can search through all accounts from this period.

Here's, to me the most interesting, snippet from the google translaton of the history of the Brotherhood in Dutch Geschiedenis van de broederschap

In 1318 this group received official status as a brotherhood, with the approval of the Bishop of Liège, who also laid down arrangements for the celebrations.

Which led me to this site Liège (Luik, Lüttich) (Latin (or Roman) Diocese) [Catholic-Hierarchy]
Revealing the Catholic root, quelle surprise.

The practices of Catholic Church and Freemasonry are remarkably similar, as a slight aside.
The Brotherhood were a 'sect' of the Catholic Church as are the Jesuits and Cistercians. Seems Catholicism is happy with whatever form as long as it promotes the core belief of Church between god and man.

So 'painter man' was an active Catholic but not it seems a Jesuit, if indeed he even existed, just within the time frame of the 'great discoveries', more accurately in my view, 'the great inventing' of history entitled by the fakers 'reformation'.

If you will permit a little wander aside there is some interesting stuff on this site Jeroen Bosch - Zijn Wereld

Jeroen Bosch - His World late 15th - early 16th century

's-Hertogenbosch was founded around 1185 by Duke Henry I of Brabant.
The name originally only comes in Latin form:
- civitas apud silvam - that is - city by the forest.
The Dutch name only appears around 1300.
There were very large fires in 1419 and 1463.
In 1814 's-Hertogenbosch became the capital of the province of Noord-Brabant.

1463: Large city fire that starts in the house "De Grote Ketel" on the Verwersstraat.

1467: After the death of Duke Philips of Burgundy, Charles the Bold makes his Joyful Income in 's-Hertogenbosch.

1470: Charles the Bold liberates Duke Arnold van Gelre, after being imprisoned for six years, from his son Adolf. He is received in triumph in 's-Hertogenbosch.

1477: The "Groot Privilege" prepared by Mary of Burgundy leads to an uprising among the citizens in 's-Hertogenbosch.

1481: Maximilian of Austria convenes the fourteenth Chapter of the Golden Fleece in 's-Hertogenbosch.

1485: Desiderius Erasmus, thinker and critic of the Catholic Church, stays with the Brothers of the Common Life until 1487 as a boy.

1496: Philips the Fair is inaugurated as Duke of Brabant.

1504: The city serves as the basis for military operations against Gelre. In the winter of 1504/1505, Philips the Fair stays with his father Maximilian in the city.

1505: The old Romanesque St. John's Church is demolished for the completion of the nave of the new Gothic church.

1508: Inauguration of Maximilian of Austria, after the death of his son Philips the Fair in 1506 as guardian.

1512: The Geldersen try to take the city but must withdraw.

1515: Charles the Fifth keeps his Glad Incomste as Duke of Brabant.

A few facts about his World

1345- ca. 1500: Hoekse and Kabeljauwse disputes in Holland. Cities are generally Cods and before a strong central Burgundian authority, the nobility is against.

1450: Invention of the printing press. Gutenberg in Mainz, Laurens Jansz. Coster in Haarlem.

1451: Great uprising in Ghent against the centralizing tendencies in the reign of the Burgundian duke Philip the Good.

1471: Thomas á Kempis, leader of the Modern Devotion movement (Geert Grote, 1340-1384) in the Northern Netherlands. Strive for spiritual renewal in the Church.

1477: Death of Charlemagne on the battlefield. His daughter, Maria, married to Maximiliaan (father of the later Emperor Charles V), acquires the Netherlands.

1481: The Burgundians subdue the mighty
Duchy of Gelre.

1483-1485: First Flemish Revolt against Maximilian.

1488-1492: Second Flemish Revolt against Maximilian.

1492: Christopher Columbus "discovers" America.

1492: Karel van Egmond, back from French imprisonment, becomes Duke of Gelre.

1493: The Habsburg Maximilian becomes emperor of the German Empire. Duke Philip the Fair becomes Lord of the Netherlands.

1498: Vasco da Gama discovers the sea route to the East Indies.

1500: Leonardo da Vinci paints his Mona Lisa; Michelangelo manufactures his David.

1505: Flaring Gelderland War. Looting, including in Brabant, by his general Maarten van Rossum.

1507: Copernicus: the earth is not the center, the universe is infinite.

1515: Charles V of age, succeeds Maximilian in 1519 as emperor of the German Empire.

1516: The English humanist Thomas More publishes Utopia, the imaginary perfect country. The literary counterpart of Jheronimus Bosch's Garden of Delights.

1517: Martin Luther openly acts against the practices of the Catholic Church. A year later, reformational books are available in Antwerp.

1520/1521: The painter Albrecht Dürer makes a journey through the Netherlands and goes to 's-Hertogenbosch. In his report he mentions Saint John, but does not mention his professional brother Jheronimus Bosch.
 
Last edited:

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
937
Reactions
2,501
Turns out he may not have been a prolific painter and much like the cartographer crew of the Reformation a lot of work attributed to him today is the work of unknowns.
Jeroen Bosch - Schilderijen

About his Paintings

Jeroen Bosch never dated his paintings and only signed a few. The oevre preserved and attributed to him is quite small.
It consists of approximately 25 paintings and 8 drawings.

They are triptychs (triptychs - a painting consisting of three parts) fragments of triptychs and separate panels.Almost always painted with oil on wood.

Much of his work portrays sin, the failure of human morality and the malice and foolishness of humanity. He uses many symbols and proverbs.
It is striking that his work is open to divergent interpretations and that many details from his work have still not been explained.

Generations of admirers have gazed at the devils, monsters and pained people who populate his paintings. Why did Jeroen Bosch paint like that?
Was he insane. Did he have a corrupt mind or was he under the influence when he painted?

His work raises many questions, more than when he painted it. You should not want to understand Jeroen Bosch too much.
Watching is more than enough!

The titles of his work are as follows:

Beehive and Witches (drawing)
The Calvary with Donor
The Epiphany
The Bronchorst-Bosschuy triptych
The Adoration of the Magi
The Adoration of the Magi
The Death of a Miser
Christ Crowned with Thorns
The Triptych of the Crucified Martyr
The Magician - The Conjurer
Saint Christopher
Saint Jerome
The Hell and the Flood
The Hay Wain
Extraction of the Stone of Fools
Christ Carrying the Cross
The lost Son
The Pilgrim
The Pedlar
The Man Tree
The Garden of Earthly Delights
The Temptation of Saint Anthony
The seven Deadly Sins
Animal Studies
Ecce Homo
Witches
The Hermit Saints Triptych
The Last Judgment
The Ship of Fools or Allegory of gluttony and unchastity
The forest that hears and sees (drawing)
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John on Patmos
Two Witches
Two Monsters
The Owl's Nest


Certainly generates a lot of 'modern' interest
Jeroen Bosch - Over Hem

Interesting numbers relating to the work and the painter(s) Bosch in numbers: the number of originals, the cost of caring for a beard, the scope of jubilee celebrations and other non-final things

Doing a search for info about his wife "aleut goyarts van der meerwene" on giburu, duckduckgo said there were "no results", this site came up;
Jheronimus Bosch | Flemish Primitives
Which contains a Bosch timeline I found interesting.

Jheronimus Bosch

Jheronimus Bosch was born around 1450 to a family of painters. His grandparents came from the german town of Aachen, but migrated westwards, direction of Nijmegen in the Northern Low Countries. Bosch's father was observed being in 's Hertogenbosch. It is suspected that Bosch was born there in a family of five children, or which four of them took up the painter's brush. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Our Blessed Lady.

Bosch developed a highly recongisable, idosyncratic painting style. Bosch cannot be placed stylistically in line with the Primitives, in that he proceded too self-styled with his work. His ouevre, however, indeed falls within the established limits of time and place. Primarily, he enjoys prestige for his fantastic and nearly diabolical works with all sorts of beings that in general have a moralising meaning. A typical example is the Triptych of the Grail, better known as The Garden of Earthly Delights Triptych in the Prado Museum in Madrid. Bosch shows what the consequences of sin and debauchery are.
Circa 1450 Bosch was presumably born in ´s Hertogenbosch.

1474 Bosch's name is recorded for the first time in documents that have been preserved.

1480-1481 Bosch is mentioned as a painter for the first time.
June 1481 He marries Aleyt Goyart van den Meervenne, a daughter of a moneyed member from the local patriciate.

1486 Bosch becomes a member of the Brotherhood of Our Blessed Lady. In 1488 he is sworn in as member, which indicates a necessary status. In 1493, 1503-04, 1508-09 and 1511-12 he produces five small works for the fraternity.

1488 Bosch is the owner of a house with land in the Schilderstraetken in ´s Hertogenbosch, inherited by his wife.

1474-1498 Fourteen documents are found for this period with regards to financial transactions for Bosch and his wife, among which is the sale of his wife's real estate.

1500 Bosch is meanwhile wealthy enough that he no longer has to paint. Tax records for the years 1502-03 and 1511-12 shows that Bosch belonged to the ten wealthiest citizens of ´s Hertogenbosch.

1516 Jheronimus Bosch dies.



Turns out even his wife had another name;
Aleyd Godfried Godfried Brants van de Meervenne

Also Known As: "Aleyt Goyarts"

Giberu serves up this site which contains another time line for Bosch;
Great Works of Western Art - Hieronymus Bosch

Hieronymus Bosch

About 1450 Born as Jeroen van Aken in ’s Hertogenbosch in the central Netherlands.

1481 Marries Aleyt Goyarts van den Meervenne, whose dowry consisted of an estate near ’s Hertogenbosch and other property. It is probable that Bosch did not need to support himself by painting.

1486 or 7 Jeronimus van Aken enters the Brotherhood of Our Lady in ’s Hertogenbosch.

1488 Becomes a ‘sworn’ member of the Brotherhood, the only artist to be so honoured.

1488–90 Works on an altarpiece for the Brotherhood’s chapel in the Cathedral of St John.

1504 Philip the Fair, Duke of Burgundy, orders the Last Judgement altarpiece from Bosch.

1516 Dies in ‘s Hertogenbosch.


A Ukranian's site with a little bit about Bosch and gives his take on some of the paintings;
The mysterious art of Hieronymus Bosch | The Waking-up journal
Real name of this man Jerome Van Aken, and Hieronymus Bosch – it’s a pseudonym. Incidentally, the word Bosch in the Dutch language is translated as “wood”, that is, Jerome Wood. Why he took such a nickname, we do not know, we can only fantasize about it. Actually, he and his work is shrouded in a veil of mystery and legend.

Jerome Wood eh? Hieronyous Wood eh? Odder and odder.

This French site;
Jérôme Bosch, peintre du réalisme médiéval. - blog-des-auteurs-libres.over-blog.com
divvied up this, et another name for the fellow!

Hieronymus Van Haken (1453 - 1516)

His father Anthonis is a painter (like his grandfather), his family, of modest condition, is from Aachen and settles in Hertogenbosch (Dutch-speaking Netherlands) in the Netherlands. a few years before his birth.

We have little information about the first part of his life.
As a child he shows his interest in painting, it is probably in the paternal workshop that he made his apprenticeship.

Anthonis is artistic advisor of the "Brotherhood of Our Lady", he realizes for her gilding work and paintings on wood.

Hieronymus takes the name of Hieronymus Bosch, and becomes a member of the Brotherhood, which is related to the "Brothers of the Free Spirit".

This choice will affirm its philosophical unconformity, indeed the Brothers and Sisters of the Free Spirit, are a heretic current that has spread along the Rhine Valley to the Netherlands. They refer to the Alexandrian and Adamite sects and were repressed by the Inquisition, following trials and burning at the stake.
For some historians Bosch's painting would be a representation of the mysteries of the sect.

On the pictorial plane he will nonetheless suffer the influence of the "classics" he encounters during his multiple travels.
These meetings allow him to study techniques that he will use to diversify, and its originality will immediately differentiate it from the Dutch schools of the time.

The ethereal tones, the finesse of the line and the draperies show a certain influence of the artists of the Delft school.

In 1478 he married Aleyt Goyarts Van den Meervenne, an aristocrat, his eldest of 20 years, who will open the doors of the Flemish bourgeoisie, through a rather comfortable financial situation.
Aleyt adopts his convictions and enters with him in the closed circle of the "Brotherhood of Our Lady".
There were probably no children.


His artistic journey

At the beginning of his career Bosch worked for the Brotherhood and the big families, quite soon his fame will shine beyond the local community. Philip the Handsome, Duke of Burgundy commissioned him a "Last Judgment", Margaret of Austria a "Saint Anthony", the Venetian cardinal Grimani, would have acquired 3 works of the painter.

Its expression illustrates the duality of good and evil

It represents the metaphysical questions of the thinkers of his time, typical of the medieval world and his worries.

Paradise, evil, vice, suffering, death, hell, the end of time, bestiaries and fantastic mechanics swarm in his universe to meet the saints, demons and humans confronted with the temptations and sins that are the daily the man.

Bosch is inspired by the Old and New Testament (iconography, texts), strictly respecting biblical writings. His orthodox works, shrouded in symbolism and esotericism, often have a moralistic meaning

A work difficult to locate in time
For several years we note the absence of Bosch in the Netherlands, probably at the option of his travels including Milan and Venice.

His paintings are not dated, and many were destroyed after his death, probably because of his belonging to the current resistant to the dogmas of the church.

The painter of the realism of his time

Bosch died in 1516 in Hertogenbosch, he began the renewal in the way of seeing and figuring the spiritual and the divine.


So this site suggests he did travel about a bit and the lady he married was 20 years older than him and loaded to boot. He was very well connected, as the saying goes, not some jobbing artist struggling to sell paintings.
An unconformist sect of Catholicism according to the french author. It gets murkier and murkier.
 

tupperaware

Well-known member
Messages
246
Reactions
672

Brilliant Effie post showing the armor connection to the fishknights. I am honored to make this extremely interesting connection via NewEarths's video all about medieval armor being used as the exoskeleton of alien creatures.


Are we seeing the creatures in armor that NewEarth is talking about? Clearly there are vestiges of a dead civilization in the first pane. Then in the central pane these fishknights are seen as the peaceful bearers of a most excellent berry fruit with amazing powers of debauchery. Perhaps they are still around providing these juicy handouts and living in underwater habitats still?




There is an analysis of this armor as exoskeleton theory written by a Russian author somewhere on the Net. He is mentioned somewhere in the video.
 
Last edited:

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
937
Reactions
2,501
Not seeing the remnants of civilisation in the first pane unless you are referring to the grey bits top right which look unnatural.
As for the 'alien' armour bearer how does this fit with the armour bearer in the third pane getting eaten by dogs who has the face of a man?

There are an awful lot of 'modern theories' contained within those three panels.

The green bits in what follows are the bits that too me suggest a particular scenario, suggest note just suggest.
Bosch either was a real living life or its a fiction. I feel he was most likely a real painter but left nothing of note for posterity. Someone for nefarious reasons took this life and added to it an awful lot of fake connections and paintings commissioned from unknown painters to obscure reality.

The reason why so much of his life is unknown is because it was unremarkable not 'worthy' of recording by the people of the day, whenever that day was. He was not mentioned until 'modern times' when all the painting 'connections' were made by 'experts'.

Then there is the obfuscation of the 'sects'. The Brotherhood Bosch belonged to was headed by a Roman Catholic Bishop of Liege and yet this sect was 'affiliated with' another Brotherhood active in the same part of town not headed by a Bishop, as far as I can tell (haven't finished looking just Bosched out at the moment!) which was a heretical sect a non conforming sect. If that is the case and Bosch was painting for the Brotherhood, Cardinals, Prince's etc all staunch followers of the Roman Catholic Religion then how it beggars belief that his pictures were not buried with him.

The tales of marriage don't ring true to me either. A woman who today would be labelled 'cougar' who is part of the rich merchant class marries a man who today would be labelled 'toy boy' who is a painter in a family of painters crucially NOT part of the rich merchant class and there is a twenty year age gap between them.
I haven't dug into her fathers death date but I struggle to see how a living father of the day would allow a daughter to marry one so young and from a lower class of people, from the merchants perspective, especially one who seems set on remaining a spinster for so long unless there was a shame angle to it or he was genuinely concerned for his daughters fate after his death. Still seems odd as it would have been more likely to find a merchant somewhere who would take her as a wife.

A painter whose work is ordered by Royalty and Cardinals who was quickly forgotten about after his death whose pictures were 'discovered' in the collections of Royalty and Religious Houses all seems very 'neat'. pictures that survived centuries of wars, pestilence, Religious and Political upheavels, not to mention the many fungi, insects, damp, etc that naturally attack the paint and the canvas/wood the pictures are made on seems a great stretch to me.

Anyway that's all that has come out of this exercise at the moment. Do have a read through and see what's there for you, if anything and add it in.
I should have done the green thing above but was too tired so may go back and do it as well for clarity, such as it is, purposes.
From here;
El Bosco - Biografía de El Bosco

Biography of El Bosco

Famous Dutch or Dutch painter, whose given name was Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aeken, but was better known as Bosch or Jerome Bosch, who had been born in the city of Debodo, located in the south of the Netherlands, near Tilburg in 1450, The precise date of his birth is unknown, but it is estimated that it was around October 2 and he died in August 1516. At the time of his birth, that area was the possession of the Duke of Burgundy.

His family was from the German city of Aachen,
as denoted by his van Aken name, van Aeken, since in German the city was called Aachen, and his whole family was devoted to painting, his father Anthonis van Aeken, his grandfather Jan van Aeken and his older brother Goossen van Aeken, so according to the system of estates used in the Middle Ages, all were part of the guild. For that reason, to be unionized, the surname could only be used by the father and his death, he went on to use his older brother, so Jeroen had the need to adopt another simplified artistic name of his hometown, which was Den Bosch in Dutch, which resulted in El Bosco.

There are verifications that already in 1463 he used the surname den Bosch, even though in his country they called him until 1480 as Jeroen Die maelre, which means "Jerome the painter".

Although there is no precise information on how his artistic training took place, it can be assumed that he ran for the family workshop that was dedicated to fresco painting, wood sculpture and the production of sacred objects, which were commissioned by the cathedral.

Due to the economic solvency of his marriage to Aleyt van der Meervenne,
daughter of the wealthy bourgeois Goyarts van der Meervenne, he was very free to choose the theme of the works he accepted as commission, since Aleyt had contributed as a dowry some land located in the zone of Oorschot, but also this union assured him the entrance to the social world of the bourgeoisie of the cities.

With the advance of the inquisition that was lived in those times, in 1486 he entered a religious brotherhood that venerated Our Lady, the Vrouve broederschap, to which his wife already belonged; Although it was only an association of laypersons who worshiped the Virgin, they did charitable works and performed sacred representations, this helped her to form artistically and culturally, living in an intense mystical current.

From 1500 to 1504 there is no documentation referring to El Bosco, so it is assumed that he was in Italy, in Venice, for the large number of his works that are in private collections and dating from those years. From that time is also the style of very large figures located in wonderful landscapes.

The painting of El Bosco is distinguished by representing the figures of the saints as ordinary people, highly vulnerable, sometimes almost caricaturesque. The exaggeration of the grotesque and sarcasm, generated by the imagery of the time about alchemy, magic, bestiaries and all sorts of similar elements, is evident, perhaps linked to the fact that in 1500 a wave of apocalyptic rumors broke out , so in the work of El Bosco there is always a moralistic, satirical message, yes. That is why he introduced normal or monstrous figures in his works with great expressiveness.

That capacity for a little burlesque fantasy won him many admirers, perhaps unusual, but buyers of his work, as were Father Sigüenza and Felipe de Guevara, who were the first to speak of his work and of course Felipe II, who managed to reunite a great amount of works of this painter, which explains that in Spain it can be appreciated in many museums.

On August 9, 1516 the mass is celebrated by the painter in the chapel of Our Lady, which was dominated by the brotherhood, which is recorded in the registers of the brotherhood of Our Lady of Bolduque.



From here;
Biographie et œuvre de Jérôme Bosch

Around 1453-1516

Hieronymus van Aken was born around 1453 at 's-Hertogenbosch or Den Bosch (translated into French as' s-Hertogenbosch, bosch meaning wood), a municipality in the south of the Netherlands (North Brabant). He borrowed the final syllable of the name of his birth community to form his pseudonym artist and is now universally known as Hieronymus Bosch or Jerome Bosch for French speakers. He was in a way predestined to become a painter since his grandfather Jan van Aken and his father Anthonis van Aken were already doing this job.

His training period therefore takes place in the family workshop in which his uncles also worked. In 1478, he married Aleyt Goyarts Van den Meervenne, the daughter of a wealthy bourgeois, twenty years older. He thus acquires a financial ease which will give him a greater freedom of creation. In 1480, he appears as a painter in the archives of his commune. The two became members of the Notre-Dame de Bois-le-Duc fraternity in 1486, following a family tradition. This brotherhood was dedicated to the worship of the Virgin and works of charity. But she is also considered to be close to a heretical sect The Brothers of the Free Spirit. It is not known if the painter was part of this sect, but according to the German art historian Wilhelm Fraenger (1890-1964) his work reflects his influence. This is a simple conjectural interpretation of the painter's work, without objective historical elements.

At that time, Bosch worked for the large families of 's-Hertogenbosch, for the brotherhood of Notre Dame and other communities of the same type as well as for the surrounding towns. His reputation will spread rapidly: the Duke of Bourogne Philippe le Beau (1478-1506) and the Venetian Cardinal Grimani (1461-1523) send him orders. The biography of Bosch with many shortcomings, it is not excluded that he traveled to Italy, as sometimes painters of that time.

The life of Jerome Bosch then continues peacefully in 's-Hertogenbosch between his wife, his workshop and the brotherhood of Notre Dame. His atypical inspiration comes from readings like that of Jan van Ruysbroeck (1293-1381), cleric Brabant author of eleven mystical treatises written in Dutch and suspected of heresy by Jean de Gerson (1363-1429), Chancellor of the University from Paris.

Jerome Bosch died in 1516 in 's-Hertogenbosch and he was soon forgotten.
Karel Van Mander (1548-1606) mentions it in his Book of Painters of 1604, but from the classicism we will see in him only a madman or an extravagant; this until the first half of the 20th century.

Artwork
Chance has nothing to do with Bosch's rediscovery in the 20th century. Psychoanalysis can detect the language of the unconscious, surrealism that of a visionary, etc. But such interpretations are much older and have only been adapted to the taste of the day. In 1605, Jose de Sigüenza (1544-1606), Spanish historian and theologian, already wrote: "The others seek to paint men as they appear from the outside; he has the audacity to paint them as they are inside.

The first angle of analysis is therefore that of a painter of interiority; an interiority troubled, tormented, worried. The hold of religion on the spirits of the time, Christian Manichaeism, are reflected in evocations of paradise and hell. The demon manifests itself in the form of various figures considered more or less monstrous and it can even hide in the surrounding objects. The work of Bosch is therefore first and foremost very historically situated: it offers us an image of the inner world of men of this pivotal period of history, which is slowly emerging from the Middle Ages while still leaving for a long time in the minds of men, naive figures and a simplistic religious dichotomy between good and evil.
The second approach is to focus on artistic expression. Bosch is both a draftsman and a colorist of genius. This did not escape the art lovers of his time; the Archduke of Austria and the King of Spain were admirers of Bosch. By observing the details, reproduced below, of the Jardin des délices, it is easy to note the major innovations in the use of color compared to "Flemish primitives". These are only shades of gray, ocher, pink, green, effects of transparency, but also contrasts between dark backgrounds and bright objects.
Bosch has often been compared to surrealist painters; the latter use the pictorial techniques with the same state of mind: Max Ernst, L'antipape (1941-42); Salvador Dali, Swans Reflecting Elephants (1937). It is a question of offering by the image an access to a more or less obscure dimension of the human reality (dreams, fantasies, unconscious, etc.). If, at the end of the Middle Ages, human interiority had a strong religious dimension, it was not limited to that. Bosch's demons and Dali's monsters are cousins. Thus, beyond his initial religious inspiration, the work of Hieronymus Bosch touches the universal because it evokes the most intimate of the human being.


From here;
Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne - Jheronimus van Aken ou Aeken dit Jheronimus en français Jérôme Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch, the Temptation of St. Anthony

Flemish painter ('s-Hertogenbosch v. 1450 - 1516).

His family, perhaps from Aachen, had been at Bois-le-Duc for at least two generations. His grandfather Jan and his father, Anton Van Aken, were painters. We know that in 1481 Bosch was married to Aleyt, daughter of the wealthy bourgeois Goyarts Van der Mervenne, whom he had no children. From 1486, he was mentioned as a member of the brotherhood of Notre-Dame, but his membership in this religious group does not, it seems, to explain the sources of his inspiration. The rare mention of orders made to the artist (in 1488-89, shutters of a carved altarpiece for the brotherhood of Notre-Dame, in 1504, last Judgment for Philippe le Beau) could not be attached to known works . The evolution of his style has been reconstructed by Charles de Tolnay only through hypotheses based on the analysis of his works. Bosch's oldest paintings (Christ on the Cross, Brussels, MRBA, 2 versions of Ecce Homo, Frankfurt, Städel, Inst., And Boston, MFA) are hardly distinguishable by their originality, although the artist introduce characters with almost caricature facies. The Deadly Sins (Prado) illustrate a less common theme, with a joke that reveals a popular inspiration. Each episode is developed in the manner of a genre scene, where the emphasis is not on props, but on human attitudes. The same vein appears in Death of the Miser (Washington, N.G.) And the Nave of Fools (Louvre). This last work is perhaps the first known illustration of a theme dear to Bosch and which assumes an essentially critical and moral attitude, that of human madness that neglects the teaching of Christ. It is also the oldest panel executed following a technique of a surprising brio which, on an incisive drawing, often readable through the thin pictorial layers, encases the characters by a few strokes of brush or suggestive light impasto: already Van Mander noticed that Bosch was painting "suddenly". To this first group of works can be attached: 4 panels evoking Paradise and Hell (Venice, palace of the Doges, mentioned since 1521 in the collection of Cardinal Grimani), interpretations of medieval legends on the afterlife, close to the thought of the mystics; 2 paintings on the theme of the Flood and Hell (Rotterdam, B. V. B.), on the back of which appear four scenes whose meaning remains obscure; finally a Port of the Cross (Vienna, K.M.).


It is in the principal period of its activity that the great triptychs sought by Philip II of Spain should be associated.
The Hay Cart (Prado) develops the theme of human madness. Original sin and hell, described on the shutters, frame a mysterious scene whose interpretation is still rather imprecise in detail. The combination of realistic and picturesque figures with imaginary and devilish creatures dominates the whole composition and will now be characteristic of Bosch's art. The creation of monsters is performed with an inexhaustible imagination and a remarkable sense of anatomical likelihood.

The Temptation of St. Anthony of Lisbon (M. A. A.), which so strongly impressed Flaubert's imagination, is one of the most justly celebrated and enigmatic works of the painter. The episodes of the Golden Legend are developed with extraordinary fantastic verve. Each detail implies, it seems, subtle allegories, but the essential theme is none the less the struggle of Good and Evil. The backs of the shutters have for subject the Arrest of Christ and the Carrying of the Cross with the death of Judas, that is to say the fall of an apostle associated with the suffering of the Savior for humanity.

The Last Judgment of Vienna (Akademie) is undoubtedly a work in part "surpeinte" or an old replica which largely deals with a traditional theme. The Garden of Delights (Prado), major work of the artist, has attracted the most varied comments. On the reverse of the shutters, the creation of the world is evoked in a vision of a powerful poetry, where the elements are separated in a globe emerging from the black nothingness.

Open, the triptych presents, between Paradise and Hell, the Garden of delights: fantastic landscape, prodigious swarm of nudities, sometimes associated in pairs, sometimes opposed in groups and accompanied by gigantic vegetable forms and strange beasts. From a careful analysis, we tried to assert the membership of Bosch in an "adamic" sect, whose existence at the end of the fifteenth century. is far from proven. It is more likely that the central panel is dedicated to human temptation and decadence, which is engendered here by the pleasures of the senses and lust. The giant fruits are sexual symbols and recall the definition that Siguenza gave in 1576 of this work: "The picture of the vain glory and the taste of the strawberry or pomegranate, of its taste which is hardly felt when it is already past. "A fragment of Hell's representation (Munich, Alte Pin.), whose style is similar to that of the Garden of Delights, is perhaps a fragment of the Last Judgment painted for Philip the Fair in 1504. a series of works with great characters, especially devoted to saints, is still attached to this central group.

The Saint John in Patmos (Berlin museums) is remarkable for the quality of its landscape: the colorful transitions, so dear to the primitives, still mark the relative distance of the planes; yet it is a realistic vision of the Dutch landscape, without notable relief and dominated by water. Nearby qualities are found in the Saint Jerome in prayer (Ghent Museum), which translates with even greater passion abandonment in mystical communion. The two triptychs of the Doge's Palace in Venice (Altarpiece of the Hermits and Triptych of Saint Julie) are unfortunately quite degraded. In the same series, a Saint Christopher (Rotterdam, BVB), a Saint John the Baptist in the desert (Madrid, Lázaro Galdiano museum) and a Saint Anthony (Prado), in which the landscape is clearly dominated by luxuriance of the trees. Some great masterpieces still illuminate the last years of the painter's production. The Carrying of the Cross (Ghent Museum) is made up of a mesmerizing mosaic of faces, from which emerge by their purity those of Christ and Saint Veronica. The Adoration of the Magi of the Prado associates, in a landscape close to that of Saint John of Berlin, the divine world of the Gospel to that of the fantastic, to emphasize the presence of the wicked Evil around the Savior. The Prodigal Son (Rotterdam, BVB) is perhaps the highest pictorial success of Bosch, by the poetry of his harmonies of browns and grays raised some pale red tones, in which presents an unforgettable figure of worried vagabond . A recent and subtle interpretation sees in this work the image of the peddler, who is himself one of the classic allegories of one of the "children of Saturn", that is to say, one of the four "moods" "humanity, melancholy.

The work of Bosch has an exceptional significance in the art of his time through his sense of mystery as well as his wealth of iconographic invention. Its essential orientation seems to be dictated by moral concerns, and it is appropriate to situate it in a changing religious milieu, animated by the movement of the Devotio moderna. Undoubtedly, Bosch's obvious complacency in portraying monsters and the presence of an often sexual fantasy can be psychoanalytic, but such an "analysis" can only come after the distinction of essential themes. Bosch's compositions were often copied or imitated during his lifetime and in the next century. The obvious relations of his theme, in spite of everything mysterious, with that of Bruegel the Elder, have been the subject of much discussion.
 

tupperaware

Well-known member
Messages
246
Reactions
672
Not seeing the remnants of civilisation in the first pane unless you are referring to the grey bits top right which look unnatural.
As for the 'alien' armour bearer how does this fit with the armour bearer in the third pane getting eaten by dogs who has the face of a man?

There are an awful lot of 'modern theories' contained within those three panels.

The green bits in what follows are the bits that too me suggest a particular scenario, suggest note just suggest.
Bosch either was a real living life or its a fiction. I feel he was most likely a real painter but left nothing of note for posterity. Someone for nefarious reasons took this life and added to it an awful lot of fake connections and paintings commissioned from unknown painters to obscure reality.

The reason why so much of his life is unknown is because it was unremarkable not 'worthy' of recording by the people of the day, whenever that day was. He was not mentioned until 'modern times' when all the painting 'connections' were made by 'experts'.

Then there is the obfuscation of the 'sects'. The Brotherhood Bosch belonged to was headed by a Roman Catholic Bishop of Liege and yet this sect was 'affiliated with' another Brotherhood active in the same part of town not headed by a Bishop, as far as I can tell (haven't finished looking just Bosched out at the moment!) which was a heretical sect a non conforming sect. If that is the case and Bosch was painting for the Brotherhood, Cardinals, Prince's etc all staunch followers of the Roman Catholic Religion then how it beggars belief that his pictures were not buried with him.

The tales of marriage don't ring true to me either. A woman who today would be labelled 'cougar' who is part of the rich merchant class marries a man who today would be labelled 'toy boy' who is a painter in a family of painters crucially NOT part of the rich merchant class and there is a twenty year age gap between them.
I haven't dug into her fathers death date but I struggle to see how a living father of the day would allow a daughter to marry one so young and from a lower class of people, from the merchants perspective, especially one who seems set on remaining a spinster for so long unless there was a shame angle to it or he was genuinely concerned for his daughters fate after his death. Still seems odd as it would have been more likely to find a merchant somewhere who would take her as a wife.

A painter whose work is ordered by Royalty and Cardinals who was quickly forgotten about after his death whose pictures were 'discovered' in the collections of Royalty and Religious Houses all seems very 'neat'. pictures that survived centuries of wars, pestilence, Religious and Political upheavels, not to mention the many fungi, insects, damp, etc that naturally attack the paint and the canvas/wood the pictures are made on seems a great stretch to me.

Anyway that's all that has come out of this exercise at the moment. Do have a read through and see what's there for you, if anything and add it in.
I should have done the green thing above but was too tired so may go back and do it as well for clarity, such as it is, purposes.
From here;
El Bosco - Biografía de El Bosco

Biography of El Bosco

Famous Dutch or Dutch painter, whose given name was Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aeken, but was better known as Bosch or Jerome Bosch, who had been born in the city of Debodo, located in the south of the Netherlands, near Tilburg in 1450, The precise date of his birth is unknown, but it is estimated that it was around October 2 and he died in August 1516. At the time of his birth, that area was the possession of the Duke of Burgundy.

His family was from the German city of Aachen,
as denoted by his van Aken name, van Aeken, since in German the city was called Aachen, and his whole family was devoted to painting, his father Anthonis van Aeken, his grandfather Jan van Aeken and his older brother Goossen van Aeken, so according to the system of estates used in the Middle Ages, all were part of the guild. For that reason, to be unionized, the surname could only be used by the father and his death, he went on to use his older brother, so Jeroen had the need to adopt another simplified artistic name of his hometown, which was Den Bosch in Dutch, which resulted in El Bosco.

There are verifications that already in 1463 he used the surname den Bosch, even though in his country they called him until 1480 as Jeroen Die maelre, which means "Jerome the painter".

Although there is no precise information on how his artistic training took place, it can be assumed that he ran for the family workshop that was dedicated to fresco painting, wood sculpture and the production of sacred objects, which were commissioned by the cathedral.

Due to the economic solvency of his marriage to Aleyt van der Meervenne,
daughter of the wealthy bourgeois Goyarts van der Meervenne, he was very free to choose the theme of the works he accepted as commission, since Aleyt had contributed as a dowry some land located in the zone of Oorschot, but also this union assured him the entrance to the social world of the bourgeoisie of the cities.

With the advance of the inquisition that was lived in those times, in 1486 he entered a religious brotherhood that venerated Our Lady, the Vrouve broederschap, to which his wife already belonged; Although it was only an association of laypersons who worshiped the Virgin, they did charitable works and performed sacred representations, this helped her to form artistically and culturally, living in an intense mystical current.

From 1500 to 1504 there is no documentation referring to El Bosco, so it is assumed that he was in Italy, in Venice, for the large number of his works that are in private collections and dating from those years. From that time is also the style of very large figures located in wonderful landscapes.

The painting of El Bosco is distinguished by representing the figures of the saints as ordinary people, highly vulnerable, sometimes almost caricaturesque. The exaggeration of the grotesque and sarcasm, generated by the imagery of the time about alchemy, magic, bestiaries and all sorts of similar elements, is evident, perhaps linked to the fact that in 1500 a wave of apocalyptic rumors broke out , so in the work of El Bosco there is always a moralistic, satirical message, yes. That is why he introduced normal or monstrous figures in his works with great expressiveness.

That capacity for a little burlesque fantasy won him many admirers, perhaps unusual, but buyers of his work, as were Father Sigüenza and Felipe de Guevara, who were the first to speak of his work and of course Felipe II, who managed to reunite a great amount of works of this painter, which explains that in Spain it can be appreciated in many museums.

On August 9, 1516 the mass is celebrated by the painter in the chapel of Our Lady, which was dominated by the brotherhood, which is recorded in the registers of the brotherhood of Our Lady of Bolduque.



From here;
Biographie et œuvre de Jérôme Bosch

Around 1453-1516

Hieronymus van Aken was born around 1453 at 's-Hertogenbosch or Den Bosch (translated into French as' s-Hertogenbosch, bosch meaning wood), a municipality in the south of the Netherlands (North Brabant). He borrowed the final syllable of the name of his birth community to form his pseudonym artist and is now universally known as Hieronymus Bosch or Jerome Bosch for French speakers. He was in a way predestined to become a painter since his grandfather Jan van Aken and his father Anthonis van Aken were already doing this job.

His training period therefore takes place in the family workshop in which his uncles also worked. In 1478, he married Aleyt Goyarts Van den Meervenne, the daughter of a wealthy bourgeois, twenty years older. He thus acquires a financial ease which will give him a greater freedom of creation. In 1480, he appears as a painter in the archives of his commune. The two became members of the Notre-Dame de Bois-le-Duc fraternity in 1486, following a family tradition. This brotherhood was dedicated to the worship of the Virgin and works of charity. But she is also considered to be close to a heretical sect The Brothers of the Free Spirit. It is not known if the painter was part of this sect, but according to the German art historian Wilhelm Fraenger (1890-1964) his work reflects his influence. This is a simple conjectural interpretation of the painter's work, without objective historical elements.

At that time, Bosch worked for the large families of 's-Hertogenbosch, for the brotherhood of Notre Dame and other communities of the same type as well as for the surrounding towns. His reputation will spread rapidly: the Duke of Bourogne Philippe le Beau (1478-1506) and the Venetian Cardinal Grimani (1461-1523) send him orders. The biography of Bosch with many shortcomings, it is not excluded that he traveled to Italy, as sometimes painters of that time.

The life of Jerome Bosch then continues peacefully in 's-Hertogenbosch between his wife, his workshop and the brotherhood of Notre Dame. His atypical inspiration comes from readings like that of Jan van Ruysbroeck (1293-1381), cleric Brabant author of eleven mystical treatises written in Dutch and suspected of heresy by Jean de Gerson (1363-1429), Chancellor of the University from Paris.

Jerome Bosch died in 1516 in 's-Hertogenbosch and he was soon forgotten.
Karel Van Mander (1548-1606) mentions it in his Book of Painters of 1604, but from the classicism we will see in him only a madman or an extravagant; this until the first half of the 20th century.

Artwork
Chance has nothing to do with Bosch's rediscovery in the 20th century. Psychoanalysis can detect the language of the unconscious, surrealism that of a visionary, etc. But such interpretations are much older and have only been adapted to the taste of the day. In 1605, Jose de Sigüenza (1544-1606), Spanish historian and theologian, already wrote: "The others seek to paint men as they appear from the outside; he has the audacity to paint them as they are inside.

The first angle of analysis is therefore that of a painter of interiority; an interiority troubled, tormented, worried. The hold of religion on the spirits of the time, Christian Manichaeism, are reflected in evocations of paradise and hell. The demon manifests itself in the form of various figures considered more or less monstrous and it can even hide in the surrounding objects. The work of Bosch is therefore first and foremost very historically situated: it offers us an image of the inner world of men of this pivotal period of history, which is slowly emerging from the Middle Ages while still leaving for a long time in the minds of men, naive figures and a simplistic religious dichotomy between good and evil.
The second approach is to focus on artistic expression. Bosch is both a draftsman and a colorist of genius. This did not escape the art lovers of his time; the Archduke of Austria and the King of Spain were admirers of Bosch. By observing the details, reproduced below, of the Jardin des délices, it is easy to note the major innovations in the use of color compared to "Flemish primitives". These are only shades of gray, ocher, pink, green, effects of transparency, but also contrasts between dark backgrounds and bright objects.
Bosch has often been compared to surrealist painters; the latter use the pictorial techniques with the same state of mind: Max Ernst, L'antipape (1941-42); Salvador Dali, Swans Reflecting Elephants (1937). It is a question of offering by the image an access to a more or less obscure dimension of the human reality (dreams, fantasies, unconscious, etc.). If, at the end of the Middle Ages, human interiority had a strong religious dimension, it was not limited to that. Bosch's demons and Dali's monsters are cousins. Thus, beyond his initial religious inspiration, the work of Hieronymus Bosch touches the universal because it evokes the most intimate of the human being.


From here;
Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne - Jheronimus van Aken ou Aeken dit Jheronimus en français Jérôme Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch, the Temptation of St. Anthony

Flemish painter ('s-Hertogenbosch v. 1450 - 1516).

His family, perhaps from Aachen, had been at Bois-le-Duc for at least two generations. His grandfather Jan and his father, Anton Van Aken, were painters. We know that in 1481 Bosch was married to Aleyt, daughter of the wealthy bourgeois Goyarts Van der Mervenne, whom he had no children. From 1486, he was mentioned as a member of the brotherhood of Notre-Dame, but his membership in this religious group does not, it seems, to explain the sources of his inspiration. The rare mention of orders made to the artist (in 1488-89, shutters of a carved altarpiece for the brotherhood of Notre-Dame, in 1504, last Judgment for Philippe le Beau) could not be attached to known works . The evolution of his style has been reconstructed by Charles de Tolnay only through hypotheses based on the analysis of his works. Bosch's oldest paintings (Christ on the Cross, Brussels, MRBA, 2 versions of Ecce Homo, Frankfurt, Städel, Inst., And Boston, MFA) are hardly distinguishable by their originality, although the artist introduce characters with almost caricature facies. The Deadly Sins (Prado) illustrate a less common theme, with a joke that reveals a popular inspiration. Each episode is developed in the manner of a genre scene, where the emphasis is not on props, but on human attitudes. The same vein appears in Death of the Miser (Washington, N.G.) And the Nave of Fools (Louvre). This last work is perhaps the first known illustration of a theme dear to Bosch and which assumes an essentially critical and moral attitude, that of human madness that neglects the teaching of Christ. It is also the oldest panel executed following a technique of a surprising brio which, on an incisive drawing, often readable through the thin pictorial layers, encases the characters by a few strokes of brush or suggestive light impasto: already Van Mander noticed that Bosch was painting "suddenly". To this first group of works can be attached: 4 panels evoking Paradise and Hell (Venice, palace of the Doges, mentioned since 1521 in the collection of Cardinal Grimani), interpretations of medieval legends on the afterlife, close to the thought of the mystics; 2 paintings on the theme of the Flood and Hell (Rotterdam, B. V. B.), on the back of which appear four scenes whose meaning remains obscure; finally a Port of the Cross (Vienna, K.M.).


It is in the principal period of its activity that the great triptychs sought by Philip II of Spain should be associated.
The Hay Cart (Prado) develops the theme of human madness. Original sin and hell, described on the shutters, frame a mysterious scene whose interpretation is still rather imprecise in detail. The combination of realistic and picturesque figures with imaginary and devilish creatures dominates the whole composition and will now be characteristic of Bosch's art. The creation of monsters is performed with an inexhaustible imagination and a remarkable sense of anatomical likelihood.

The Temptation of St. Anthony of Lisbon (M. A. A.), which so strongly impressed Flaubert's imagination, is one of the most justly celebrated and enigmatic works of the painter. The episodes of the Golden Legend are developed with extraordinary fantastic verve. Each detail implies, it seems, subtle allegories, but the essential theme is none the less the struggle of Good and Evil. The backs of the shutters have for subject the Arrest of Christ and the Carrying of the Cross with the death of Judas, that is to say the fall of an apostle associated with the suffering of the Savior for humanity.

The Last Judgment of Vienna (Akademie) is undoubtedly a work in part "surpeinte" or an old replica which largely deals with a traditional theme. The Garden of Delights (Prado), major work of the artist, has attracted the most varied comments. On the reverse of the shutters, the creation of the world is evoked in a vision of a powerful poetry, where the elements are separated in a globe emerging from the black nothingness.

Open, the triptych presents, between Paradise and Hell, the Garden of delights: fantastic landscape, prodigious swarm of nudities, sometimes associated in pairs, sometimes opposed in groups and accompanied by gigantic vegetable forms and strange beasts. From a careful analysis, we tried to assert the membership of Bosch in an "adamic" sect, whose existence at the end of the fifteenth century. is far from proven. It is more likely that the central panel is dedicated to human temptation and decadence, which is engendered here by the pleasures of the senses and lust. The giant fruits are sexual symbols and recall the definition that Siguenza gave in 1576 of this work: "The picture of the vain glory and the taste of the strawberry or pomegranate, of its taste which is hardly felt when it is already past. "A fragment of Hell's representation (Munich, Alte Pin.), whose style is similar to that of the Garden of Delights, is perhaps a fragment of the Last Judgment painted for Philip the Fair in 1504. a series of works with great characters, especially devoted to saints, is still attached to this central group.

The Saint John in Patmos (Berlin museums) is remarkable for the quality of its landscape: the colorful transitions, so dear to the primitives, still mark the relative distance of the planes; yet it is a realistic vision of the Dutch landscape, without notable relief and dominated by water. Nearby qualities are found in the Saint Jerome in prayer (Ghent Museum), which translates with even greater passion abandonment in mystical communion. The two triptychs of the Doge's Palace in Venice (Altarpiece of the Hermits and Triptych of Saint Julie) are unfortunately quite degraded. In the same series, a Saint Christopher (Rotterdam, BVB), a Saint John the Baptist in the desert (Madrid, Lázaro Galdiano museum) and a Saint Anthony (Prado), in which the landscape is clearly dominated by luxuriance of the trees. Some great masterpieces still illuminate the last years of the painter's production. The Carrying of the Cross (Ghent Museum) is made up of a mesmerizing mosaic of faces, from which emerge by their purity those of Christ and Saint Veronica. The Adoration of the Magi of the Prado associates, in a landscape close to that of Saint John of Berlin, the divine world of the Gospel to that of the fantastic, to emphasize the presence of the wicked Evil around the Savior. The Prodigal Son (Rotterdam, BVB) is perhaps the highest pictorial success of Bosch, by the poetry of his harmonies of browns and grays raised some pale red tones, in which presents an unforgettable figure of worried vagabond . A recent and subtle interpretation sees in this work the image of the peddler, who is himself one of the classic allegories of one of the "children of Saturn", that is to say, one of the four "moods" "humanity, melancholy.

The work of Bosch has an exceptional significance in the art of his time through his sense of mystery as well as his wealth of iconographic invention. Its essential orientation seems to be dictated by moral concerns, and it is appropriate to situate it in a changing religious milieu, animated by the movement of the Devotio moderna. Undoubtedly, Bosch's obvious complacency in portraying monsters and the presence of an often sexual fantasy can be psychoanalytic, but such an "analysis" can only come after the distinction of essential themes. Bosch's compositions were often copied or imitated during his lifetime and in the next century. The obvious relations of his theme, in spite of everything mysterious, with that of Bruegel the Elder, have been the subject of much discussion.
Here is what looks exactly like a "dolmen" (the lower part) with thousands scattered across the globe. The two blue disks are giant wheels and also man or some other species made.

Dolmen - Wikipedia

20392

20398


Here is Eden's snake wrapped around probably the tree of Knowledge with head "pointing" to a little cave lower left first pane. Quite a few of the animals in the pond are moving into the cave from waters which clearly are transforming a few into mutants as in the three headed lizard in the top pond ( more in this group) and the three headed bird in the lower pond. All the waters in this image have the power to transform animals into "mutants" See the smaller snake in this image lower left? It has white spines. This confirms my theory that the glass tubes shown at the base of the central pink plant and much more frequently in the middle pane are tools of transformation literal or metaphorical or both. Birds are shown walking into one of these transformation pods left pane that are seen everywhere (the pods) in the middle pane.

Since there are two snakes on this tree it probably is not the tree of Knowledge. The central tree in the left pane is... central.
20394


Bosch is making heavy use of visual metaphor focusing on "evolution/transformation/chimerization" the question is to what intent?

So Bosch has a pre Darwin notion of evolution but going beyond Darwin he anticipates human animal chimeras and their "evil" potential. First human-pig chimeras created, sparking hopes for transplantable organs — and debate
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Top