Great/Grandparents and What We Learn From Them

AgentOrange5

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So, when I first found this forum and was reading through it, I agreed that it seemed obvious our history had been altered. But my thinking was it had to have been done way in the past. The idea that it could have been altered as recently as 150 years, or even sooner, didn't make any sense to me. Because I'm old enough, that my grandparents were all born within 1900 - 1915. My thinking was, of course they would have told me if history had suddenly been rewritten. Even if they hadn't experienced it directly, their own parents/grandparents would have told them of any major rewriting in their recent history.

But would they?

I've been thinking about this. And my gut reaction doesn't really mesh up with reality.

1 set of my grandparents, including my most educated grandparent who graduated high school (the only one of my grandparents to have done so), absolutely hated history. They refused to talk about it. If I ever brought it up, they would not answer any questions, say the past didn't matter, I should be concerned with the present, yada yada yada. My parent likewise never learned any history from them, justifying it as talking about history with my grandparents brought up bad memories of family members who had died very young, so that was why they never talked about it.

My other set of grandparents, were seemingly uneducated, rural folk. 1 had graduated from 8th grade, 1 had quit school long before that. They knew plenty of local history....which was solely about their rural area. They talked about crops, and other family members and what they were presently doing, and had stories of my parent growing up. They never talked about history outside of their own farm and children growing up. At the time, I assumed because they never graduated high school, and of course they didn't have TV or even radio when they were growing up, that they just didn't know anything about history. And that may possibly be true. Or maybe they just didn't want to talk about it. In retrospect, these grandparents while perhaps not formally educated, weren't exactly uneducated. They owned a surprisingly large number of books for uneducated rural farmers (mostly fictional classics), that they said they had read. They religiously read the newspaper and watched the news on TV (by the time I came along.) They knew what was going on in the world, but they never discussed it.

Which makes me wonder, how common is this? Anyone here who has grandparents/great-grandparents from the turn of the century, what kind of stories did your grandparents tell? Did they avoid history? Or maybe they didn't avoid it but their stories sounded text-book like?

We trust our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents....maybe some of them knew a whole lot more than they let on. It's easy to speculate that if indeed they were aware of evil people co-opting history, that they would have kept quiet for their own safety and for their families safety.

My grandparents are all dead. But if history were co-opted as recently as 150 years ago, there are surely people still alive who have knowledge (as least 2nd hand knowledge) of what the truth may be. (at least for the most recent history "reset".)
 

cheap

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look at kids today and what they believe with this controlled media. Maybe it is the same thing that happened in the past. Maybe like today only a fraction of the population can see our fabricated history.

It's still happing right now in front of us.
 

BStankman

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More oral histories need to be shared.

Plenty of poverty and depression stories.
And you kids today have it too easy, right before you are given something you didn't ask for.
No history of orphans, but plenty of child labor.

They could be lying for your own good.
I suspect everyone went to the rapture, and they were left behind because they took the mark of the beast.
People were a lot tougher back then.
 

UnusualBean

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I never got the chance to learn much of anything from my grandparents, but I've learned some interesting things from my parents by reading between the lines. There seems to be this weird brainwashing that causes them to come to conclusions about the past that aren't backed up at all by the stories they share. I've found it's better to ask more roundabout questions instead of direct interrogation.

One of the bigger things I've gleaned is that it was totally normal (albeit less common) for women to be property owners and heads of households around the turn of the century. Being a homemaker was also considered akin to a profession and was well respected, and educated women were considered better than uneducated women. Basically the entire narrative that women were kept barefoot and pregnant and weren't allowed to progress past middle school is totally false.
 

Ishtar

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I was raised by one set of grandparents, who although smart, independent and educated, were the type to believe and trust everything the government told them. Our family history seemed very clear and detailed, but as I got older, many of the stories changed...I realized I couldn't trust oral history from the over-medicated boomer generation. My grandmother also seemed to be triggered by anything “weird” or unusual and was upset by my questions about family ethnicity (They’re from the Ozarks btw, and definitely have both native and aristocratic heritage). My own reseach into the family tree is pulling up descrepancies with genealogy as well. My memory of great-grandparents was that they all had a very harsh and concerned nature, which my grandmother attributed to them living through The Great Depression. Even she carried that family trauma, being somewhat of a hoarder.

My other side of the family is full of a lot of unknowns, orphanages, and military weirdness.

My other related thoughts on this tie into Mandela Effect and Dreams, so I’ll save it for an esoteric thread if we ever make one.
 

Tonep

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interesting thread, i have wondered about this too. i think we will find what @Ishtar said (full of a lot of unknowns, orphanages, and military weirdness) is a common thread everywhere. I don't know anything about my great-grands except one of the patriachs had a lot of kids, like 21. and he was a sharecropper. I'm black (African-American or whatever) so u know my history as told to us is we were slaves so...deadend there.
 

Paracelsus

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I actually did meet my paternal great-grandmother. She was born in 1906 in Baselga de Piné, Italy. Never actually spoke with her aside from greetings, she just seemed senile, or hard of hearing. Either way, I never gleaned any interesting historical information firsthand.

Being obsessively curious and inquisitive is most often a rare trait in families. I'm the solitary anomaly in mine.

* Forgot to add, my dad tried to connect with grandma Jo too. With him she was always fairly aloof. However, his maternal grandmother was fairly interesting. She was a heavy drinker that came from a German pioneer family that settled in Denver back in the 1860's- 1870's. My Irish side came over in 1856 from Athlone and settled in Wisconsin, South-Side Chicago and Denver. For whatever reason, most of my family ended up in Colorado. We are mountain people.
 
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GroundhogLfe

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My stories heard first hand pretty much coincide with the written history since the 1930's and there's nothing to contest. Though I've never heard much war stories of actually being on the battlefield like some other families have, just that my father was pretty much forced to move as a refugee from Karelia to middle of Finland when the Soviet threat became high in WW2.

I don't believe history can be changed that fast without a conquest and state oppression, but it can be re-written with changing it a bit from generation to generation with school books. It is the parents obligation to know what is being taught to your children and if you're not interested in that, well that's your loss.

Even without a conquest history can be revisioned after some generations of an incident at ease with an agenda by promoting certain aspects that to whitewash some other important narrative away. The digital world will make this all much easier to even change and edit photos and maps and all to fit and make a narrative believable with forged evidence.

Great topic that also supports to look for other narratives for legends and oral tradition as the written sources could've been burned away.
 
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Onthebit

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I think education was a bit different pre 1960.....my mother 'only' had grade 9 but she was an accomplished seamstress/chef/typist etc. I mean she had skills we don't have unless we go to college. She joined the airforce as a young woman and jumped out of perfectly good airplanes. Then she got pregnant, dismissed from the military and from her catholic family. Such a disgrace? She fled to Ontario where she met my father whom she promptly married to absolve herself from the horrible sin of having a child out of wedlock. She had to flee because back then if you weren't married the province took the child.
 

WildFire2000

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My only surviving grandparent had a stroke of some kind due to stress sometime last year and the only thing she can remember about history and the past is the standard history that I already was taught. I wanted to talk to her about the past (she was born in 1929) and the late 1930's and through WW2 and everything, but I didn't question the past until it was too late. However, from what I've noticed from other older people, when they DO talk about the past, it was either 1) too traumatic and they don't really want to discuss it, or 2) They retell things based on what the media and 'common history' tells them already, and by that I mean they tell by having you fill in information, they say 'Well, we heard X, but ...' and then it's left that "We didn't really know, so what you're taught must be right, because information wasn't as reliable back then," and then it's dropped. That's the way all of my conversations have gone with the older generation.

We also have to consider that the normalization of history occurred in the early 1900's with ... and I can't remember his name. He published a book on the complete history of the world to the present, and it solidified itself within Western culture as THE definitive stream-lined approach to what happened in the past. I cannot for the life of me remember who wrote it, but he's famous and I know I've seen him discussed on this forum. Anyway, point of it all is that even our grandparents would have been presented with the normalization as early as the 1940's. So...
 

Will I am

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So, when I first found this forum and was reading through it, I agreed that it seemed obvious our history had been altered. But my thinking was it had to have been done way in the past. The idea that it could have been altered as recently as 150 years, or even sooner, didn't make any sense to me. Because I'm old enough, that my grandparents were all born within 1900 - 1915. My thinking was, of course they would have told me if history had suddenly been rewritten. Even if they hadn't experienced it directly, their own parents/grandparents would have told them of any major rewriting in their recent history.

But would they?

I've been thinking about this. And my gut reaction doesn't really mesh up with reality.

1 set of my grandparents, including my most educated grandparent who graduated high school (the only one of my grandparents to have done so), absolutely hated history. They refused to talk about it. If I ever brought it up, they would not answer any questions, say the past didn't matter, I should be concerned with the present, yada yada yada. My parent likewise never learned any history from them, justifying it as talking about history with my grandparents brought up bad memories of family members who had died very young, so that was why they never talked about it.

My other set of grandparents, were seemingly uneducated, rural folk. 1 had graduated from 8th grade, 1 had quit school long before that. They knew plenty of local history....which was solely about their rural area. They talked about crops, and other family members and what they were presently doing, and had stories of my parent growing up. They never talked about history outside of their own farm and children growing up. At the time, I assumed because they never graduated high school, and of course they didn't have TV or even radio when they were growing up, that they just didn't know anything about history. And that may possibly be true. Or maybe they just didn't want to talk about it. In retrospect, these grandparents while perhaps not formally educated, weren't exactly uneducated. They owned a surprisingly large number of books for uneducated rural farmers (mostly fictional classics), that they said they had read. They religiously read the newspaper and watched the news on TV (by the time I came along.) They knew what was going on in the world, but they never discussed it.

Which makes me wonder, how common is this? Anyone here who has grandparents/great-grandparents from the turn of the century, what kind of stories did your grandparents tell? Did they avoid history? Or maybe they didn't avoid it but their stories sounded text-book like?

We trust our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents....maybe some of them knew a whole lot more than they let on. It's easy to speculate that if indeed they were aware of evil people co-opting history, that they would have kept quiet for their own safety and for their families safety.

My grandparents are all dead. But if history were co-opted as recently as 150 years ago, there are surely people still alive who have knowledge (as least 2nd hand knowledge) of what the truth may be. (at least for the most recent history "reset".)
My thoughts are the more education you receive the less likely you are to see what is really going on. I wish I knew what I know now 30 years ago so could have asked my grand parents about their views of what was going on. I don't even know if they would have had a clue to what was happening as I'm sure deceit has been going on for more than just a couple generations.
 

Paracelsus

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My thoughts are the more education you receive the less likely you are to see what is really going on. I wish I knew what I know now 30 years ago so could have asked my grand parents about their views of what was going on. I don't even know if they would have had a clue to what was happening as I'm sure deceit has been going on for more than just a couple generations.
Right before my paternal grandfather died I had a good conversation with him about my generation (millenial) and Facebook, cellphones, and modern dating. He knew I was a jock, so he could relate to me about sports and competition. But the utter superficiality of millenials was largely incomprehensible to him. Clearly, the most obvious agenda we can see being pushed is artificiality/simulacra: VR, Immersive videogames/pornography, smart appliances, wearable electronics, multi-platform integration.

I'm 32 and find myself saying in some Clint Eastwood Man With No Name voice - what the hell is Kik and Whatsapp?

I sure as hell don't believe our salvation comes from computers!

 

Moshtradamus

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My grandpa (dad’s side) was born in 1928 in rural West Virginia. I’m talking... cabin in the woods, had a hidden moonshine still, washed their clothes in the creek.

My mother was very interested in his family history that he could share, being as it was so different than her side coming over here from Italy in about 1899 (my great grandma stayed in Italy, and no one even seems to know why. Not even my mom’s still living aunts. No history shared there.) I’ve recently been able to track them as far back as 1736, still living in the same county as my grandfather grew up in. The only issue was my mom got absolutely nothing from Pop. Nothing to the point where he did not even know what his grandparents first names were. I got this information from scratch. He wasn’t a stupid man. He was well spoken, owned his own business until age 75 when he passed it to my uncle. He just... didn’t know anything at all.

There’s “word of mouth” history, such as a friendly run in with Jesse James staying with them and the fact that we came over here to New Orleans (although I can’t for the life of me get past WV 1736...) from France after being in the king’s (who even knows which one!?) inner circles. Even the little bit of info on that that is vague and lacking, nor can I even get close to confirming it.

On both sides they just didn’t pass things down or share any histories... Even if me, my parents, aunts and uncles, etc tried to get anything out of anyone they would just completely brush you off. Even one generation in, no one passed down speaking Italian once they got here. It’s a little comforting to know this wasn’t the reaction in only my family. I have to wonder why...
 

Verity

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So, when I first found this forum and was reading through it, I agreed that it seemed obvious our history had been altered. But my thinking was it had to have been done way in the past. The idea that it could have been altered as recently as 150 years, or even sooner, didn't make any sense to me. Because I'm old enough, that my grandparents were all born within 1900 - 1915. My thinking was, of course they would have told me if history had suddenly been rewritten. Even if they hadn't experienced it directly, their own parents/grandparents would have told them of any major rewriting in their recent history.

But would they?

I've been thinking about this. And my gut reaction doesn't really mesh up with reality.

1 set of my grandparents, including my most educated grandparent who graduated high school (the only one of my grandparents to have done so), absolutely hated history. They refused to talk about it. If I ever brought it up, they would not answer any questions, say the past didn't matter, I should be concerned with the present, yada yada yada. My parent likewise never learned any history from them, justifying it as talking about history with my grandparents brought up bad memories of family members who had died very young, so that was why they never talked about it.

My other set of grandparents, were seemingly uneducated, rural folk. 1 had graduated from 8th grade, 1 had quit school long before that. They knew plenty of local history....which was solely about their rural area. They talked about crops, and other family members and what they were presently doing, and had stories of my parent growing up. They never talked about history outside of their own farm and children growing up. At the time, I assumed because they never graduated high school, and of course they didn't have TV or even radio when they were growing up, that they just didn't know anything about history. And that may possibly be true. Or maybe they just didn't want to talk about it. In retrospect, these grandparents while perhaps not formally educated, weren't exactly uneducated. They owned a surprisingly large number of books for uneducated rural farmers (mostly fictional classics), that they said they had read. They religiously read the newspaper and watched the news on TV (by the time I came along.) They knew what was going on in the world, but they never discussed it.

Which makes me wonder, how common is this? Anyone here who has grandparents/great-grandparents from the turn of the century, what kind of stories did your grandparents tell? Did they avoid history? Or maybe they didn't avoid it but their stories sounded text-book like?

We trust our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents....maybe some of them knew a whole lot more than they let on. It's easy to speculate that if indeed they were aware of evil people co-opting history, that they would have kept quiet for their own safety and for their families safety.

My grandparents are all dead. But if history were co-opted as recently as 150 years ago, there are surely people still alive who have knowledge (as least 2nd hand knowledge) of what the truth may be. (at least for the most recent history "reset".)
My grandmother was a bit of a hardarse- both of them actually but in entirely different ways.
One was an artist, slightly wild from wealth with an interesting family line that can be traced way back to Scottish nobility in the 1000's (but how far back is it really?), and an English side of her family was recorded in the Domesday book (Domus Dei Book- what a subject, and how far back was THAT really?).
She died when I was around four but I liked her because she smiled right in my eyes once and I've never forgotten that look. Deeply memorable.

The other grandmother was modest, educated, kept beautiful roses, married an archdeacon and was a seriously moralising victorian.
Her side kept records dating from the 1600's through male heirs in a chest of documents/drawings/pictures/anecdotes etc., but- although recently compiled in to a published book by my uncle- I've not yet received my copy.

I learned more from the victorian-standards grandmother simply because she lived longer and;
I quite simply rejected everything she said while she lived due to my expensive and extensive education. So did my mother, and so did I reject my mothers version too. So that's three generations, highly educated, blown to bits. I'm using my young daughter as an experiment in homeschooling- whether it changes that dynamic I'll know in about fifteen years.

Once our language had no written form, and I'm starting to see the wisdom in that.
There's something funny about the priest class writing the KJB, introducing modern English, wiping out the pagan/runic alphabet- effectively taking control and getting everyone literate on their phonetic terms.
I also see the wisdom in home-schooling if one actually wants to keep the family together. No guarantees of course.
But there is something so very sinister within that education system. All of the modern systems, food, farming, medicine etc., but particularly that.

The victorian grandmother rejected tv (apart from news and live cricket), film, the stage and the YELLOW PERIL.
She also used to say- much to my utmost horror- that 'blacks' should be left alone in their own countries to work things out for themselves, and ought to be shot when they run amok in white countries.
This was in peak 'Feed the World' propaganda late 80's early 90's and my shock could not have been more intense; we were milling around in a haberdasher (British version- she wasn't trans :) ) while she bought some dress fabric and I remember locking eyes with my sister, our mouths agape. Will never forget- we were so embarrassed, but to her it was casual honesty and common sense.

My sister and I used to huddle together and whisper what an absolute 'racist' she was, how could our mother even be related to such a racist.
She knew the threat was there back in the 1940's I suppose because her parents would have been concerned, but she couldn't have said anything to anyone in the 80's/90's without modern education slamming her 'opinion.'
She was so forthright, so morally sound in all ways that we really couldn't say anything to her face.
It's very strange, clever and sinister the way we've been divided.. and conquered? Almost..
 

whitewave

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There was a lot of social pressure back in the day and people generally kept things to themselves. It wasn't until Phil Donahue came up with his tell-all show that spilling your guts to total strangers came in vogue. My family history was hidden from me but I'm nosey and sussed it out for myself. My great grandmother was Cherokee but could pass for Caucasian. My grandmother (her daughter) only verified that tidbit when I was in my 20's and confronted her with the evidence. She told me that it was for safety because you could kill a "half-breed" but killing a white woman would get you in trouble. My grandmother could pass for Caucasian and she never even told her husband that she was "half-breed" (what an ugly term!) because in her day it was actually illegal to marry outside your race. That story made me cry. She had to cut off ties with her parents in case someone found out which is about the saddest thing ever. I met my great grandmother when I was 5 and she made such an impression on me that she's the reason I got into foraging, herbal medicine and became a nurse.

My father's side of the family were German but changed their name to something more English sounding during WWII because you didn't want to be a German-American in America during WWII. So a lot of my family history has been hidden from me. The stories of my parents/grandparents were carefully selected to be generic stories that wouldn't reveal their secrets.

I've worked with the elderly and listened to their stories but their generation just didn't divulge personal information. Some sort of social taboo. Mainly they'll tell you stories of the wars they were in or the domestic life they lived but rocking the historical boat is just not done. You don't question the authorities official version; in fact, I don't think they ever even thought to do so. More trusting, naive generation.
 

UnusualBean

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Cherokee but could pass for Caucasian.
This is something that's currently in the process of being rewritten, but your great grandmother probably was actually Caucasian, just not "white" by the racial standards of the time. "White" classification has made a lot of transformations over the years, and even today people still argue about whether all light skinned Caucasians are "white" or not.

Anyway, the Cherokee and surrounding peoples weren't a fully homogeneous bunch, but they were mainly of Mediterranean descent. That's why there are so many modern Americans with family stories of Cherokee and etc. ancestry whose DNA results tell them "No, you're Jewish!" or "No, you're Spanish!" etc. This is also the case in my family. We have verifiable Native ancestry, and not a small amount of it either, but my DNA test looks like somebody closed their eyes and threw darts at a map of Eurasia. It's something you see whispered about in the corners of the internet, but people really don't talk about it in real life. Even tribes don't really talk about it. You're family or you're not, and race is only an issue if you're not.

Example of a full blooded Cherokee girl from a century ago:



At the time they described her looks as "Grecian". They knew.
 

Paracelsus

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This is something that's currently in the process of being rewritten, but your great grandmother probably was actually Caucasian, just not "white" by the racial standards of the time. "White" classification has made a lot of transformations over the years, and even today people still argue about whether all light skinned Caucasians are "white" or not.

Anyway, the Cherokee and surrounding peoples weren't a fully homogeneous bunch, but they were mainly of Mediterranean descent. That's why there are so many modern Americans with family stories of Cherokee and etc. ancestry whose DNA results tell them "No, you're Jewish!" or "No, you're Spanish!" etc. This is also the case in my family. We have verifiable Native ancestry, and not a small amount of it either, but my DNA test looks like somebody closed their eyes and threw darts at a map of Eurasia. It's something you see whispered about in the corners of the internet, but people really don't talk about it in real life. Even tribes don't really talk about it. You're family or you're not, and race is only an issue if you're not.

Example of a full blooded Cherokee girl from a century ago:



At the time they described her looks as "Grecian". They knew.
My maternal grandfather was half Cherokee, born on a reservation in Oklahoma and looked Italian. All of my mom's side has extensive Cherokee heritage, while they weren't necessarily "proud" of it, they certainly weren't ashamed.

Cherokee genetics definitely present unique physical features, both my mom and I are fairly blonde-ish and small boned. No-one on my dad's side could be described as small boned and fair-featured whatsoever, but I ended up with all of their athletic ability.

From what my mom has told me from her grandparents The Trail of Tears was a very real event for their grandparents. Savages getting shit-canned to badlands, probably made me tougher for it.
 

Silvanus777

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My grandparents on both sides were simple countryfolk. Simple, honest, hard working people that toiled night and day and withstood the harshest of circumstances in times of world war, scarcity and hardships of all kinds - they are the reason I am even here and I have gratitude for that.

I did not know my paternal grandfather (born 1914), who was a shoemaker and small time farmer (for self-sufficiency, one or two cows and a few hens I believe). He committed suicide way before I was born. The shame of that and the ensuing hardships of raising 5 children alone must have changed my paternal grandmother (born in '22), and she did not much talk about the past. In fact she tried to cover many of it up really. So I didn't get much information about the past or family history from that side, to my dismay. I always was very inquisitive, which annoyed my grandma greatly. Never ask too many questions!

On the maternal side the picture looked differently: Grandfather and grandmother were born in 1922 and '27 respectively and both come from the same extended family (4th cousins) of farmers. In general, in my area of rural upper Austria, up until WW2 I would say the "genetic pool" was very much geographically confined, to put it politely. Meaning everyone married someone either from the same countryside town or from the neighboring ones. People didn't get around a lot then. To be taken to the county hospital some 25 km away used to be a huge deal in the 30s, 40s and 50s.

I have very similar feelings about my (maternal) grandparents as @Verity described. They are both dead now, but I will always remember them as outstandingly forthright, morally sound, common-sense and warm-hearted individuals. Able to find pleasure and satisfaction in the simple things of life. This sort of people has simply been "discontinued", to use some cynicism. You don't find these anymore. To this very day it boggles my mind and invokes nothing but the deepest respect for my grandparents thinking how Grampa had his friends blown up next to him in Russia, survived Stalingrad, hiked back from there on foot only to go through some more war trauma and artrocities, lost his younger brother of 16, AND STILL, in he and many of his generations I experienced as the most kind, mentally stable and morally sound people I ever met. Same for the women going through wartime at home, like my grandma.

He had hardly any formal education, having started to work as a indentured servant at 6 or 7, but Grampa was a wellspring of old stories and now lost knowledge regarding the old way of living, the land and the people in his immediate surroundings. He had an unfailing memory as it seems, and he seemed to remember his war years day by day as it seems. It deeply saddens me that I missed my chance of writing it all down, when he passed away in an unexpected accident.

Over here as well, orally-transmitted knowledge of anything prior to 1900 is hardly extant. An elderly relative of mine whose family valued passing on these stories a bit more still can tell some odd stories from WWI, and reports about French soldiers in the Napoleonic Wars camping on the grassland next to their farmhouse. In general, the Napoleonic Wars is the farthest living memory seems to reach back in my neck of the woods. The "Blue Frights" as they called that of old, for reason of the blue uniforms.

What saddens me the most in regard of lost knowledge is the purging or at least neutering of what I consider my native language, and the original tongue of common folk Austrians, which I consider successfully accomplished. Austrians to this day, mostly the folks outside of the capitol Vienna, speak a rather strong German dialect of one sort or another. However much of it has been curtailed in its fulness and richness, ever since compulsory schooling was first forced upon the people up to today. Even I remember how standard German was drilled into my head back in school, and that in the 90s/early 2000s and my old German professor HATED the dialect with a passion. I can only marvel (and despair) at the wealth of language that has been systematically destroyed. You can gather bits and pieces from old town chronicles and local folkloristic publication, and of course my Grandpa would have known it all (but he died almost 20 years ago), and it is fascinating how seemingly all birds, all beetles, all plants and specific things would used to have completely different names from today, sounding outlandish even to my 31 year old ears.

Well, I could go on forever. These very localized Austrian dialects are still beautiful. They are very archaic and according to what I have seen, the (somewhat watered down) one I speak has very much in common with Old High German - a language alledgedly spoken in some elusive distant dark ages. Probably one reason why not only here, but around the worlds dialects have been and are being purged, and sanitized or even unified standard languages advanced....

Maschindreschen in Grillnedt.jpg

Maternal grandma's household and neighbours gathering for threshing wheat with steam enging as customary (early 1930s, Upper Austria)
 
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