Fragments of a Tartarian History, 1701-1702

NowhereMan

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References to Tartars in news articles from the period:

Hamburg, May 3rd, 1701:
[...]the Czar (Peter the Great) who was on his Frontiers on this side, was gone home for Moscow, upon advice that the Tartars had made an incursion into his Dominions, and that the Turks made some motions as if they intended to retake Aloph.
17171

Hamburg, May 13th, 1701:
7000 russian men quartered in Plescow are returning to Moscow likely because the Tartars have invaded.
17172

Warsaw, May 13th, 1701:
Rumor is that the Tartars have made an incursion into the Territories of the Czar.
17180

Vienna, June 11th, 1701:
rumor is Count Teckely is assembling in Walachia a considerable number of Tartars and Rebels, but the government has no account of this
17173

Hamburg, August 26th, 1701:
The disgrace and retreat of the Saxons is likely to completely ruin the Family of Sapieha, which was certainly privy to the King of Poland's designs against Sweden, seeing the GrandGeneral of Lithuania sent his own Guards and Tartars to the assistance of the Saxons, and was raising men with a design to join them, had not the Nobility prevented his intentions.
17174

Dantzick, February 11th, 1702:
Several other Deputies were of the same opinion (against prolongation of the Dyet); but the Mareschal or Speaker argued that ancestors often consented to prolongation of the Dyers, when there was a viable necessity for it, and particularily in 1649. After the dreadful irruption of Tartars and Cossacks into the Kingdom, he hoped that[...]
17178

Hague, March 3rd, 1702:
Our next advices are impatiently expected, for some letters say, that the King of Poland is retired to Cracow, and others, that he was at Warsaw, and that a great detachment of the Swedes has been beaten by Oginski, who had been joined by 8,000 Cossacks, Tartars, and Muscovites.
17175
Hamburg, July 17th, 1702:
Our last advices from Warsaw say, that the King of Sweden is marched from thence directly for Cracow, in order to fight the King of Poland before all his Foroes(?), and the Tartars are to come to his assistance, have joined him.
17176

Hamburgh, August 1st, 1702:
Letters from Riga and Coningsberg say, that an Army of 100,000 Muscovites and Tartars is advanced to Plescow with a good Train of Artillery, and that the Swedish Government has sent all troops they have to reinforce those on the frontiers, to observe the motions of the muscovites, who threaten to destroy the whole Country of Livonia with Fire and Sword.
17177
A map of Tartary from the same time period (1701), for reference:
17181

Sources:
The Post Man and The Historical Account, 1701-1702 (Printed by Fr. Leach in Elliot's Court in the Little Old Baily)
A System Of Geography, 1701 (Printed for Tim. Childe, at the White-Hart in St. Paul's Church-yard)
 
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GroundhogLfe

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Hamburg, May 3rd, 1701:
[...]the Czar (Peter the Great) who was on his Frontiers on this side, was gone home for Moscow, upon advice that the Tartars had made an incursion into his Dominions, and that the Turks made some motions as if they intended to retake Aloph.

Hamburg, May 13th, 1701:
7000 russian men quartered in Plescow are returning to Moscow likely because the Tartars have invaded.

Warsaw, May 13th, 1701:
Rumor is that the Tartars have made an incursion into the Territories of the Czar.
This is important as it states that the Tartars are making invasion towards Russia that the Czar is with.

Hamburg, August 26th, 1701:
The disgrace and retreat of the Saxons is likely to completely ruin the Family of Sapieha, which was certainly privy to the King of Poland's designs against Sweden, seeing the GrandGeneral of Lithuania sent his own Guards and Tartars to the assistance of the Saxons, and was raising men with a design to join them, had not the Nobility prevented his intentions.
I'm thinking here that who were the Saxons retreating from? Were they against the Swedes as well? I have some gaps in general history while trying to see lines drawn in the big picture.

Also interesting to mention that Lithuania would've sent Tartars to the assistance of Saxons.

Hague, March 3rd, 1702:
Our next advices are impatiently expected, for some letters say, that the King of Poland is retired to Cracow, and others, that he was at Warsaw, and that a great detachment of the Swedes has been beaten by Oginski, who had been joined by 8,000 Cossacks, Tartars, and Muscovites.
Ok so far we can sum up that Poles, Cossacs, Tartars and Muscovites are against the Swedes. We can add from above that Lithuania would've been in support against them as well in the King's plans and then also possibly the Saxons as well.
Hamburg, July 17th, 1702:
Our last advices from Warsaw say, that the King of Sweden is marched from thence directly for Cracow, in order to fight the King of Poland before all his Foroes(?), and the Tartars are to come to his assistance, have joined him.
Forces is most likely the word there, it would suit very well. In order to fight the King of Poland before all his forces and the Tartars are come to his assistance. Looks like Sweden was fighting a desperate war and they were against time.

Hamburgh, August 1st, 1702:
Letters from Riga and Coningsberg say, that an Army of 100,000 Muscovites and Tartars is advanced to Plescow with a good Train of Artillery, and that the Swedish Government has sent all troops they have to reinforce those on the frontiers, to observe the motions of the muscovites, who threaten to destroy the whole Country of Livonia with Fire and Sword.
Here we also have an interesting take. Muscovites and Tartars advancing Plescow and the Swedish government has sent all troops they have to reinforce those frontiers. But above just one year prior it was that the Tartars were approaching Russia and the Czar making preparations against that.


My summary and some hypothesis:

Some of these are huge news and are verifying to me what I've been thinking of late, that there could've been a difference between the Russians and the Muscovites. We can see there being a couple of different Russia in existence in some later maps.

If we can identify all these different states from various maps and in future call them by name properly instead of just "Russia", this will open up more.

This is also confirming me that there was an offensive from the east towards the west. This also gives more support to the thought that the Poles might've been Sarmatians, which is what the Nuremberg Chronicle claimed them to be of. At least this would support why they would work with the people from the Steppes that have been through out history attacking Europe, but then they were against the Turks however. Controversial. Perhaps there has been inner struggle to explain this.

Sarmatia, Germanic Saxon people, Tartars, possibly Lithuanians of those time have all arrived through the Steppes so there is at least that link between them. To me it seems the Steppe people were deep in to Europe and the news rumor a Tartarian rebellion in Wallachia was interesting. This also would at least give some sense to why Europe was in so much war at those times. In general it doesn't make sense for neighbors to be at war all the times. The weird thing is that Sweden & Russia fighting each other while they were also fighting the Steppe people and Turks, perhaps they should've just worked together.
 
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NowhereMan

NowhereMan

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Dantzick, February 11th, 1702:
Several other Deputies were of the same opinion (against prolongation of the Dyet); but the Mareschal or Speaker argued that ancestors often consented to prolongation of the Dyers, when there was a viable necessity for it, and particularily in 1649. After the dreadful irruption of Tartars and Cossacks into the Kingdom, he hoped that[...]
It appears to me the referenced irruption of Tartars and Cossacks in 1649 is the Khmelnytsky Uprising and the Tartars involved were likely the Crimean Tartars.
Post automatically merged:

My summary and some hypothesis:

Some of these are huge news and are verifying to me what I've been thinking of late, that there could've been a difference between the Russians and the Muscovites. We can see there being a couple of different Russia in existence in some later maps.

If we can identify all these different states from various maps and in future call them by name properly instead of just "Russia", this will open up more.

This is also confirming me that there was an offensive from the east towards the west. This also gives more support to the thought that the Poles might've been Sarmatians, which is what the Nuremberg Chronicle claimed them to be of. At least this would support why they would work with the people from the Steppes that have been through out history attacking Europe, but then they were against the Turks however. Controversial. Perhaps there has been inner struggle to explain this.

Sarmatia, Germanic Saxon people, Tartars, possibly Lithuanians of those time have all arrived through the Steppes so there is at least that link between them. To me it seems the Steppe people were deep in to Europe and the news rumor a Tartarian rebellion in Wallachia was interesting. This also would at least give some sense to why Europe was in so much war at those times. In general it doesn't make sense for neighbors to be at war all the times. The weird thing is that Sweden & Russia fighting each other while they were also fighting the Steppe people and Turks, perhaps they should've just worked together.
From what I'm looking into, these events are part of the beginning of the Great Northern War of 1700-1721 and corresponding battles thereof.
 
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welkyn

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Sarmatia, Germanic Saxon people, Tartars, possibly Lithuanians of those time have all arrived through the Steppes so there is at least that link between them. To me it seems the Steppe people were deep in to Europe and the news rumor a Tartarian rebellion in Wallachia was interesting. This also would at least give some sense to why Europe was in so much war at those times. In general it doesn't make sense for neighbors to be at war all the times. The weird thing is that Sweden & Russia fighting each other while they were also fighting the Steppe people and Turks, perhaps they should've just worked together.
The critical distinction between e.g. Tartars & Turks on the one hand and Scytho-Sarmatians on the other (incl. Saxons, Lithuanians, Celts?) would be ethnocultural; Swedes and various Norwegians would constitute another group as well, if population genetics are anything to go by.

I'm pretty sure that the first wave of steppe people (Indo-Europeans) would not look as kindly on the second wave of steppe people (Turks/Tartars)... Lots of evidence of conflict in Central Asia between Indo-Europeans and Turks/Tartars - at the same time, lots of evidence of intermixing and cultural exchange, leading to e.g. Attila, the Avars, Sarmatians and so on.
 

jd755

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thanks for the link. I'm in the never-ending process of building my own archive of old books/newspapers/pamphlets/etc and this will be in it.
As you can see on the linked thread I have here a hard copy of the sixth edition of Voltaires book. Would be happy to look through it to assist you in any way. Ha turns out the book here predates all those digitally scanned copies by 30 odd years!
 
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ScottFreeman

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As you can see on the linked thread I have here a hard copy of the sixth edition of Voltaires book. Would be happy to look through it to assist you in any way. Ha turns out the book here predates all those digitally scanned copies by 30 odd years!
Would be interesting to see your copy scanned and compared to the newer versions already online.
 

jd755

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Would be interesting to see your copy scanned and compared to the newer versions already online.
Pick a particular tale you feel is 'iffy' pick out a paragraph or three and I'll compare it with the one here and if different will write it out on here. Too old a thing to risk breaking the spine in a scanner.
 

ScottFreeman

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Pick a particular tale you feel is 'iffy' pick out a paragraph or three and I'll compare it with the one here and if different will write it out on here. Too old a thing to risk breaking the spine in a scanner.
Eww, yea. I wouldn't flatten them out either. I've used a smartphone app called 'Scanner' that works well. It takes a burst of 3 pictures, combines to a black/white pdf then asks if more pictures follow to add to the same file. No flattening needed. It might work for you for future reference if you have a lot of older books like that.
 

jd755

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Eww, yea. I wouldn't flatten them out either. I've used a smartphone app called 'Scanner' that works well. It takes a burst of 3 pictures, combines to a black/white pdf then asks if more pictures follow to add to the same file. No flattening needed. It might work for you for future reference if you have a lot of older books like that.
Don't possess a phone, smart or otherwise but good call for those who do.
 

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