Evolution of the Capitol Building, Washington DC

Timeshifter

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It sure does appear like we are looking at photographs of the same objects, but the photographs are separated by an unknown number of years. Yet, we are being told that time frame is the same.
Brain fart of the day.. perhaps we are experiencing a slow reset, and things are currently blurred out of synchronisation?

Mind blower I know, but....
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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3b32794r.jpg

@jd755, when they show us the above 1860s nonsense, instead of the machinery like below, we should be asking questions... a lot of questions. And this is just Wikipedia. I can only imagine what we are not allowed to see.

1862
Robey_Traction_engine_towing_thrashing_machine_1862.jpg



1862
Robey_patent_highway_locomotive.jpg

Am I the only one wondering what kind of highways (history) they had in 1862?

1862
Taplin_Lincoln_Traction_Engine.jpg



1870
Robey_Steamer.jpg
 

jd755

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Indeed. It seems the early traction engines couldn't pull much weight according to this brochure for Aveling and Porters latest in 1873 it was rated 6hp and there are at least 16 oxen hitched up to that transporter which is carrying 14 tons of stone plus the weight of the transporter itself. No steam traction engine of the day would move it an inch.
From here Aveling and Porter Traction Engines Promoted in 1870s Brochure

This Aveling & Porter's Patent Farm and Road Locomotive brochure, circa 1873, notes that an Aveling & Porter was awarded first prize for being one of the best agricultural locomative engines for farming by the Agricultural Society of Engliand in 1871. It also notes the daily expense of working a 6 HP engine: for one man's wages, fuel and oil, the cost would come to $6, according to the company's calculations.

From here;Oxen No Has-Beens When It Comes to Hard Pulling
Someone else can run the maths.

An ox is actually nothing more than a specially trained dairy or beef steer that has reached the age of 5. Depending on age, sex and breed, these beasts can weigh 1,500 to 3,000 pounds and pull an amount equal to or greater than their own weight.
 
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KorbenDallas

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It seems the early traction engines couldn't pull much weight
Not sure we can verify that right now. By the looks of some of these machines, some of them could pull that entire column procession, including the animals. Below is a small video pertaining to the issue of power. Pretty sure this specific steam engine is not from 1820s, but looks pretty powerful nevertheless.



1866 London Hyde Park Steam Road Roller

Interesting how this image quality progression works. We could almost sense that a photograph should come next.

steam_roller.jpg

steam_roller_1.jpg
 

ISeenItFirst

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Indeed. It seems the early traction engines couldn't pull much weight according to this brochure for Aveling and Porters latest in 1873 it was rated 6hp and there are at least 16 oxen hitched up to that transporter which is carrying 14 tons of stone plus the weight of the transporter itself. No steam traction engine of the day would move it an inch.
From here Aveling and Porter Traction Engines Promoted in 1870s Brochure

This Aveling & Porter's Patent Farm and Road Locomotive brochure, circa 1873, notes that an Aveling & Porter was awarded first prize for being one of the best agricultural locomative engines for farming by the Agricultural Society of Engliand in 1871. It also notes the daily expense of working a 6 HP engine: for one man's wages, fuel and oil, the cost would come to $6, according to the company's calculations.

From here;Oxen No Has-Beens When It Comes to Hard Pulling
Someone else can run the maths.

An ox is actually nothing more than a specially trained dairy or beef steer that has reached the age of 5. Depending on age, sex and breed, these beasts can weigh 1,500 to 3,000 pounds and pull an amount equal to or greater than their own weight.
6HP is about 3300 foot pounds per second. From there, it all depends on what kind of gearing it is hooked up to. A 2HP winch in the garage is rated to 10,000 pounds, and that is just a tiny DC motor. Of course, DC motors, they really got some grunt to them. It all still comes down to " a lever long enough and a place to stand".
 

Recognition

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Read everything twice and still not sure what it gives us as far as time frames go. Staff is truly fascinating, for the sources are claimed to be authentic, but yet contradict each other.

So this is kind of like facts I guess, because we do not appear to know what the facts are. Anyways, here are a few additional images to add to the confusion.
1861
Capitol Dome Construction
Source: The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

View attachment 23595

Harper's Weekly
December 15, 1860
View attachment 23596

Harper's Weekly
November 15, 1862

View attachment 23598

Harper's Weekly ,

March 9, 1861
View attachment 23599
Essentially, at least based on one photograph and 3 Harper's Weekly (HW) pages we have:
  • HW - 1860 - Dome is complete with the Statue
  • Photo - 1861 - Dome is not finished
  • HW - 1861 - Dome is complete and frescoes are done
  • HW - 1862 - Dome is not finished
So, which one is it, and how is it possible?

I think it's the last one. Look at the size of this worker compared to the decor he's repairing. The proportions of people to architecture look about right.

IMG_5677.jpg

IMG_5678.JPG
 

WarningGuy

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How come there were so many different colors of paint that had to be removed in the restoration? Did they paint it a different color every year?
 

whitewave

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at least 16 oxen hitched up to that transporter which is carrying 14 tons of stone plus the weight of the transporter itself. No steam traction engine of the day would move it an inch.
From here;Oxen No Has-Beens When It Comes to Hard Pulling
Someone else can run the maths.
Depending on age, sex and breed, these beasts can weigh 1,500 to 3,000 pounds and pull an amount equal to or greater than their own weight.
16 oxen able to pull 1,500 pounds each (minimum) would, with their combined effort, be able to pull 12 tons. (16 oxen times 1,500 pounds =24,000 pounds divided by 2 [2000# =1 ton] = 12,000 tons) With the combined ability for 16 oxen to pull 3,000 pounds (maximum), they would be able to pull 24 tons. Someone may want to check my math but 14 tons seems doable for a team of 16 oxen.

What is the weight capacity of the wooden wagon it was on? Not trying to bust your chops (and I don't expect an answer to the weight capacity of the wagon), just looking closely at the logistics of the official story.
 

MinLo66

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No haven't looked yet but here's a page full of interesting images of the thing changing. Mainstream for sure but there it is.
The Restoration of the United States Capitol Dome

Lots of history, timelines, material information and architects name and of course the obligatory mainstream tales, we see all to often. 17 submissions all rejected then up pops a single new one and this is accepted. Do 'they' only have the one routine they run in these narratives?
Historical Roofs: The United States Capitol Building Dome | Old Pro Roofing

Not a clue what to make of the images on this page. Historia y evolución de Washington DC [FOTOS] - ForoCoches
I just reviewed a lot of photos on that Spanish website you linked. While I admit it is COMPLETELY possible I have traveled too far down the Rabbit Hole and I am just no longer in reality, i now believe every "old" photograph they allow us access to has either been doctored or is not even a real photograph. None of it looks real to me anymore...and i really do not believe anything we've been taught or told us is even close to the truth. And one more thing i can say with about 99% certainty is that all those structures were already here (including that Parthenon "replica" in my neck of the woods), they just took them away from some other people during that event they refer to as "The Civil War".
Could there be another hill on top of this “Capitol Hill” at some point back in the day?

“Drawn from nature” has to somehow pertain to something natural. Do we have any local regradings in history?
Was not able to find much of anything to define "drawn from nature" but my best guess would be "drawn from the imagination or from memory"????
 
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RecycledSoul

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I once witnessed a Rumely Oil Pull Tractor (early 1900’s) be the only machine to be capable of a “”full pull” at a county fair tractor/truck pull contest, pulling the weight sled well past the full pull mark. It didn’t do it quickly, but that thing had plenty of “grunt” at low speed to get the job done. A lot is probably in the geering as stated earlier.
 
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KorbenDallas

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Fished this photograph below from some Russian website. It has "Architect of the Capitol" watermark on it, but I can not find any official source of this photo.

Interesting that stone blocks were individually packed. And blocks were numbered, which suggests a kit house. It could also suggest that the stone is not natural, if those are indents. Even if it's a lime or sandstone, the indents still do not make sense, for a simple pencil would suffice.

cap_const_number.jpg


Also if this indeed is the DC Capitol they are building... who knows what that brick building they are covering with the stone blocks was? I certainly hope it's not the center piece of the Capitol. That one was destroyed around 1812, and at the time of its repairs there was no photography yet.

If it's one of the wings being built, the question remains, what is the old brick building?

Basically, what are they building, where is this photograph on the official website, and what year is this?

cap_const.jpg

Here is one additional photograph.

cap_const_7.jpg
 

RecycledSoul

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Fished this photograph below from some Russian website. It has "Architect of the Capitol" watermark on it, but I can not find any official source of this photo.

Interesting that stone blocks were individually packed. And blocks were numbered, which suggests a kit house. It could also suggest that the stone is not natural, if those are indents. Even if it's a lime or sandstone, the indents still do not make sense, for a simple pencil would suffice.



Also if this indeed is the DC Capitol they are building... who knows what that brick building they are covering with the stone blocks was? I certainly hope it's not the center piece of the Capitol. That one was destroyed around 1812, and at the time of its repairs there was no photography yet.

If it's one of the wings being built, the question remains, what is the old brick building?

Basically, what are they building, where is this photograph on the official website, and what year is this?

Here is one additional photograph.

Looks like connecting of two existing structures in the last picture. Great find, KD.
 

jd755

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Fished this photograph below from some Russian website. It has "Architect of the Capitol" watermark on it, but I can not find any official source of this photo.

Interesting that stone blocks were individually packed. And blocks were numbered, which suggests a kit house. It could also suggest that the stone is not natural, if those are indents. Even if it's a lime or sandstone, the indents still do not make sense, for a simple pencil would suffice.



Also if this indeed is the DC Capitol they are building... who knows what that brick building they are covering with the stone blocks was? I certainly hope it's not the center piece of the Capitol. That one was destroyed around 1812, and at the time of its repairs there was no photography yet.

If it's one of the wings being built, the question remains, what is the old brick building?

Basically, what are they building, where is this photograph on the official website, and what year is this?

Duckduckgo again divvies up the goods.
From here; LOOK: Historical Photo Of The Senate's Most Productive Day

July 31, 1906: Cornerstone Laid On Russell Senate Office Building;

Source of the image here: Laying Cornerstone of Russell Senate Office Building
 

RecycledSoul

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Is this guy smoking a bong? Playing bagpipes? What in tarnation is he doing way up there, and for what purpose? Chiseling or taking a cross or other symbol off of a nearby structure? Screenshot taken from photo in post 58 above this one.

648CAB13-FB1F-42BB-BA81-DCED8A424A73.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

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July 31, 1906: Cornerstone Laid On Russell Senate Office Building;
Kind of had that feeling it wasn’t the Capitol. Now it would be interesting to find out if this RSO Building was built around an older brick structure. Wikipedia history portion doesn’t mention anything being there prior. Sounds like a new thread is needed for this.

Didn’t think that laying of the cornerstone looks like this.
In architectural terms, a cornerstone is the first stone laid in a building's foundation to which all other stones are laid in reference.
 

jd755

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Is this guy smoking a bong? Playing bagpipes? What in tarnation is he doing way up there, and for what purpose? Chiseling or taking a cross or other symbol off of a nearby structure? Screenshot taken from photo in post right above this one.
Looks bored shitless to me. As are most people who attend these pointless events, been there done that.

They're dropping that stone over a metal time capsule.
 

Dielectric

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Fished this photograph below from some Russian website. It has "Architect of the Capitol" watermark on it, but I can not find any official source of this photo.

Interesting that stone blocks were individually packed. And blocks were numbered, which suggests a kit house. It could also suggest that the stone is not natural, if those are indents. Even if it's a lime or sandstone, the indents still do not make sense, for a simple pencil would suffice.
I agree this is suspect. Also notice all the VIP's standing around watching? Like making sure that thing is sealed up with that specific stone?
A little odd considering that obviously work had been on-going so it's not like ground breaking.
cap_const_number.jpg


Looks bored shitless to me. As are most people who attend these pointless events, been there done that.

They're dropping that stone over a metal time capsule.
What makes sense is that if that is a time capsule, and that geopolymer cast stone is specially marked with indentations, then it's marked so that someone, somewhere, in the future can locate the time capsule.

Now that we know the building we should be able to find what is written on the stone.
will recognize the location of the time capsule.
 

jd755

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What evidence is there of creation by geopolymer or casting by mould on that stone they are lowering?
 
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KorbenDallas

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What evidence is there of creation by geopolymer or casting by mould on that stone they are lowering?
That’s a good question. What evidence is there that it is a natural stone?
 
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