En L'An 2000: 19th century vision of the year 2000

KorbenDallas

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A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards, the images depicted the world as it was imagined to be like in the then distant year of 2000.

There are at least 87 (33 below) cards known that were authored by various French artists, the first series being produced for the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. Due to financial difficulties the cards by Jean-Marc Côté were never actually distributed and only came to light many years later after the science-fiction author Isaac Asimov chanced upon a set and published them in 1986, with accompanying commentary, in the book Futuredays: A Nineteenth Century Vision of the Year 2000.

Here’s How Artists in the Late 1800s Imagined Life in the Year 2000

En L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 1.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 2.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 3.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 4.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 5.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 6.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 7.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 8.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 9.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 10.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 11.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 12.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 13.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 14.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 15.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 16.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 17.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 18.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 19.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 20.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 21.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 22.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 23.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 24.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 25.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 26.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 27.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 28.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 29.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 30.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 31.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 32.jpgEn L’An 2000 Jean-Marc Côté 33.jpg

Here’s How Artists in the Late 1800s Imagined Life in the Year 2000
En L'An 2000 - Wikipedia
A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000
100 Years Ago, Artists Were Asked to Depict the Year 2000, These Were the Results


* * * * *
Did they guess anything right?
 

Maxine

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I have a very strong feeling that this is exactly these machines that previous civilization used back then to build all these megalithic structures and buildings(all these cathedrals and e.t.c.), and i think anybody could have use these machines and build whatever they want pretty much alone by only using this machines, no people labor force was needed, only these machines were used to build everything!

17678
 

jd755

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A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards,

As a kid I collected cigarette cards, arrived here just in time to catch the tail end of them so have an interest in such things.

That first statement sound like bullshit. "and other artists" for example only one of which became a 'named artist'. Very fishy and why would the images be turned into postcards 'later' when the next part states;

"Due to financial difficulties the cards by Jean-Marc Côté were never actually distributed "

So they never went into cigarette packets so aka never left the printers if indeed they were ever printed in sufficient quantity to go into cigarette packs. Who funded the postcard? Did they ever get printed?
(From memory the tobacco companies commissioned the cards and their content, not some jobbing artists hoping to make a few quid.)

No they didn't. The story read like it was made up by either Asimov or his publisher to flog a book. Here's the evidence.

"and only came to light many years later after the science-fiction author Isaac Asimov chanced upon a set and published them in 1986, with accompanying commentary, in the book"

Exactly the same story as the fake globe Korben suspected from a few days ago.
Going back the late sixties/early seventies all sorts of 'publications' were into year 2000 predicting. It was a theme running through them for a few years then it went away with the invention of the 'oil crisis' and the coming little 'ice age' which in turn went away in the scorching summer of '76 and on an on it goes until today when it is announced 'earths atmosphere extends beyond the moon', as if and yet only last year jade rabbit was landed on the 'dark side'. It's all propaganda.(not derailing just connecting!)
As for there being no space of course there isn't these bodies are water vapour breathers. Air was introduced into the vocabulary/dictionary to make it appear to be something that it isn't.
 

whitewave

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A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards, the images depicted the world as it was imagined to be like in the then distant year of 2000.
Did they guess anything right?
Looks like they got a few right or pretty close to right.

18847
18848
18849
18850


18851
18852
18853
18854


18855
18856
18857
18858



18859
18860
18861
18862


18863
18864
18865
18866
 
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redtrx

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they appear to have a limited form of anti-gravity that everybody knows about.
What leads you to believe this simply from these drawings? That being said they do seem to have an odd fascination with flying machines, zeppelins, etc. but this kind of fits into mainstream history's account of the late 19th century with flight and aircraft being the 'next big thing' in the cultural imaginary.

I have a very strong feeling that this is exactly these machines that previous civilization used back then to build all these megalithic structures and buildings(all these cathedrals and e.t.c.), and i think anybody could have use these machines and build whatever they want pretty much alone by only using this machines, no people labor force was needed, only these machines were used to build everything!

I don't see how its feasible for what is presented here to be 'exactly' what was used to build the Tartarian/prior civ megalithic structures. But the idea that this civilisation built these structures without a labour force per se is probably correct. I personally favour the idea of a kind of on-site 3D printing or automatic mould system, but this artwork could also be an attempt of the artist to capture something of this system they may have heard described from second hand accounts, passed down memories and stories.
 

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