Did humans disappear for thousands of years?

anadentone

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With all the supposed things through out the time line of homo sapiens, droughts,wars,plagues, now curable diseases, natural disasters, animal attacks, etc, the modern humans have survived for millions of years. The questions that bothers me is "where's the remains?" There's bones of humans by the millions in the past 500-ish years (1400s-2019) from all over the world, in all cultures, yet prior to the 13th century, hardly any bones of modern man have been found. In places like Paris, you could argue that they took the bones and moved the to the catacombs, but this would only apply to larger populated areas. Where are the bones of humans from 100 ad to 1400? What about in the pre-Jesus days? We keep finding bones of humans that are millions of years old but almost none from say 100,000 years ago. With no contraception, women would be having kids at least once every 2 years. If villages had say 150 people and 55 were of bearing age, that would accumulate 55 kids per year,not including the current children and multiples. Yes, children died,women died in labor but there would still be human remains. Where are the bones of all those millions-billions of humans that once lived on Earth?
According to World Population there should be over a billion bodies strewn through out the lands.
 

milhaus

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I was thinking that perhaps we are going back to what was used in the past:
Washington poised to become first state to allow eco-friendly 'human composting'

Washington poised to become first state to allow eco-friendly 'human composting'
Washington is expected to become the first state to legalize an environmentally-friendly burial alternative that turns bodies into soil within weeks.

A bill allowing “natural organic reduction," sometimes called "human composting," has passed the legislature and is headed to Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee's desk.

Inslee, who has staked his 2020 presidential campaign on climate change, is reviewing the bill. A spokeswoman for his office said the accelerated decomposition process "seems like a thoughtful effort to soften our footprint” on the planet.

Compared to burial, the bill's sponsor, Democratic Sen. Jamie Pedersen of Seattle, said the natural organic reduction process takes up less space. It could also reduce carbon emissions emitted by cremation.

Human composting creates an average of one cubic yard of soil per body, or enough to fill about two large wheelbarrows. If the bill passes, relatives could keep the soil in urns, plant a tree with it on private property or spread it on public lands. The laws applying to scattered cremated remains would also hold true for soil, Pedersen said.

“It is sort of astonishing that you have this completely universal human experience — we’re all going to die — and here’s an area where technology has done nothing for us. We have the two means of disposing of human bodies that we’ve had for thousands of years, burying and burning,” Pedersen said. “It just seems like an area that is ripe for having technology help give us some better options than we have used.”
Strip the earth of all its resources, move everyone into cities, compost the dead and use their remains to plant trees in all the areas without people, cataclysm or plague happens, relocate people to different areas of the earth already replenished by the dead. This is only one idea. I'm afraid the truth may be far stranger than this but it could be one element.
 

SanPhaedrus

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I was thinking that perhaps we are going back to what was used in the past:
Washington poised to become first state to allow eco-friendly 'human composting'

Strip the earth of all its resources, move everyone into cities, compost the dead and use their remains to plant trees in all the areas without people, cataclysm or plague happens, relocate people to different areas of the earth already replenished by the dead. This is only one idea. I'm afraid the truth may be far stranger than this but it could be one element.
Very interesting thought. I watched Graham Hancock's latest on Joe Rogan, and there was a particular part about the richness of Amazonian soil - terra preta.

Suddenly, the Aztec sacrifice rituals begin to make a little bit more sense....

Industrial agriculture has made deserts of previously fertile fields. Yet they don’t have to stay that way for ever—barren terrain can soon regain its fruitfulness with the miracle of terra preta, the ‘black earth’.
- Terra Preta: The Secret of the Rainforest's Fertile Soil

I follow a little bit, concerned with the origins of words, and find there is no etymological entry for 'Preta'. However, a quick google search lends this definition:

Preta (Sanskrit: प्रेत, Standard Tibetan: ཡི་དྭགས་ yi dags) also known as hungry ghost, is the Sanskrit name for a type of supernatural being described in Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Chinese and Vietnamese folk religion as undergoing suffering greater than that of humans, particularly an extreme level of hunger and thirst.
- Preta, Wikipedia

And now, even more sense is made.
 

BrokenAgate

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This topic goes along with this thread: Where are the missing trillions of people? Where, indeed? Maybe multiple cataclysms took care of the graveyards by washing the corpses into the ocean or burning them up; or else people disposed of their dead differently than they do now; or the survivors burned the dead just to get rid of them because there was nowhere to put them. Probably a combination of factors. Until someone invents time travel and we can go back and check for ourselves, we may never really know. Maybe there are some clues at Gallica, which has thousands of pages of old manuscripts. I wish I had time to do an extensive search myself, but I only have the library computers to use. :(
 

Obertryn

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Very interesting thought. I watched Graham Hancock's latest on Joe Rogan, and there was a particular part about the richness of Amazonian soil - terra preta.

Suddenly, the Aztec sacrifice rituals begin to make a little bit more sense....



- Terra Preta: The Secret of the Rainforest's Fertile Soil

I follow a little bit, concerned with the origins of words, and find there is no etymological entry for 'Preta'. However, a quick google search lends this definition:



- Preta, Wikipedia

And now, even more sense is made.
Well, shit.
 

BrokenAgate

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In this video by Martin Liedtke, he discusses the tall, creepy, pale-skinned cannibals who occupied North America when the Europeans arrived. Cannibalism seems to have been very common at some point in our history. It probably happens after every reset, when there is little food to eat and the survivors resort to desperate measures to stay alive. I think a lot of humans were eaten and their remains incinerated or tossed into the nearest body of water, or composted. "Mama, I miss Grandpa." "Don't worry, dear, there's a little bit of him in all of us now."
 

whitewave

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@BrokenAgate: It makes sense that fasces would have been used to subdue and conquer the inhabitants since it makes no sense whatsoever that a handful of sailors with single shot muskets would overwhelm an entire native population.
The tall, pale people depicted sound almost like what the ufo community refer to as "nordics" (except for the cannibalism part). I'm not really up on the ufo info so it may be that the nordics are considered cannibals but I honestly don't know. They ARE extremely pale for "native Americans".
 

SanPhaedrus

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How-Outinas-men-treated-the-slain-of-the-enemy-scene-showing-the-amputation-of-limbs.jpg


... tall, creepy, pale-skinned cannibals who occupied North America when the Europeans arrived...
Here's the link to the book which the video references: Americae pars quarta. Sive, Insignis & admiranda historia de reperta primùm Occidentali India à Christophoro Columbo anno M CCCCXCII : Benzoni, Girolamo, 1519- : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Now, this interested me greatly when I first saw it on Liedtke's channel because, aside from the obvious anomaly of Spanish Conquistadors encountering pale skinned tribes in North America, the cannibals appear to have a haircut that was once quite popular with British clergy. I'd call it the "Friar Tuck".

Officially, it's a 'Tonsure'.

Now, I don't remember where I was reading about it, but there was some sort of deep schism between types of tonsures... The Catholic church banned it outright, while the British championed it. "It represented the split between Roman/Celtic churches". It was actually this short video:


So, now we have an image of Catholic Conquistadors battling white Brazillian (possibly North American/West Indies Natives, it's not consistent, or else these guys white cannibals were everywhere... ) with possibly Celtic-Christian tonsures on their heads.

Tonsure_1.JPG
Tonsure_2.JPG


Now, I want to learn more about the man who is credited with painting these depictions, in this book. A cursory search reveals Theodore de Bry as both the writer / illustrator, and the book is officially titled Americae Tertia Pars. de Bry was alive between 1528-1598, so there's an idea of a timeline...

Now, it would be important to understand what the captions and associated text read... Let's get back to that, but this de Bry piece is titled, "Inhabitants of Virginia":
inhabitants_of_virginia_from_a.jpg


He's also credited with the following depiction, which is of Nenets Hunters, "also known as Samoyed...native to northern arctic Russia. 44,857 Nenets in the Russian Federation,..speak either the Tundra or Forest Nenets languages, which are mutually unintelligible." That's convenient.

nenets.jpg


How does that connect at all? de Bry painting American + Russian natives? Well, this was synchronistic little surprise once i scrolled down to uncover what Samoyed means - "The literal morphs samo and yed in Russian convey the meaning "self-eater,"" so now they are cannibals too! Self eater - but i was originally referencing it in order to touch on the SH thread, Continent of North America does not exist... or could it be a part of Asia?

So, were there really cannibals in America and Siberia? Devouring Perspectives: On Cannibal Shamans in Siberia. Apparently just the shamans.

But anyway, I wanted to get back to some of the depictions contained in Americae Tertia Pars by de Bry. This is one image repository I used, but it's not the best. I notice that the images are often desaturated (on purpose? to conceal something maybe?).

This one is, 'Goldsmiths in Peru'. Same dudes.
peruvian_goldsmiths_from_ameri.jpg


This one is: "Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) receiving gifts from the cacique, Guacanagari, in Hispaniola (Haiti)". I thought Hispaniola was Cuba, but I digress.
christopher_columbus_1451_1506.jpg


This one, however, is titled, "The Lusitanians Send A Second Boat Towards Me"

lusitanian.JPG


Who are the Lusitanians? Well, from my brief glance, they appear to be a tribal peoples, who originated in what is now the West coast of Portugal, who were there before the Romans invaded... Lots of Celtic connections... established in the European area around Spain/Portugal before Rome established a city in 27 BC...

Much to do, much to do....
 
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