Country that the Spaniards Found in 1521, Called Yucatan

KorbenDallas

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"The first encounter with the Yucatec Maya may have occurred in 1502, when the fourth voyage of Christopher Columbus came across a large trading canoe off Honduras. In 1511, Spanish survivors of the shipwrecked caravel called Santa María de la Barca sought refuge among native groups along the eastern coast of the peninsula. Hernán Cortés made contact with two survivors, Gerónimo de Aguilar and Gonzalo Guerrero, six years later. In 1517, Francisco Hernández de Córdoba made landfall on the tip of the peninsula...." - official bla, bla, bla continues here - Spanish conquest of Yucatán.

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This tiny 1521 book has about 11 pages and is titled, "Newspaper About the Country that the Spaniards Found in 1521, Called Yucatan". I am unable to read it, so hopefully someone else can.

This small tract contains one of the first European descriptions of the Aztec civilization of Mexico and the earliest known European attempt to picture the city of Tenochtitlán (present-day Mexico City). Most likely published in Augsburg in 1522, the work is a translation into German of an earlier Spanish account of Hernando Cortes’s expedition to Tenochtitlán in 1519-20. The city is pictured rather fancifully as having five towers and five bridges. Another woodcut shows an Aztec religious ceremony involving human sacrifice. Cortés first reached Tenochtitlán in November 1519. He withdrew in July 1520 after suffering a defeat at the hands of the Aztecs, but returned with a large army to destroy the city in May-August 1521. This account does not mention the withdrawal from the city, suggesting that it is based on information from before July 1520.

yukatan_aztec_0.pngyukatan_aztec_1.pngyukatan_aztec_2.pngyukatan_aztec_3.pngyukatan_aztec_4.pngyukatan_aztec_5.png

Aztec religious ceremony involving human sacrifice

Aztec religious ceremony involving human sacrifice.png

Translation for the image was found here.

Question #1: Wasn’t Yucatan inhabited by Mayas?
Question #2: Where are the Aztecs in the image above?
Question #3: What's up with all the 1521 Yucatan architecture? The overhanging bridges?
Question #4: What does Tenochtitlan has to do with Yucatan?
Question #5: Did somebody forget to tell us about this country the Spaniards found in 1521?
 

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gregory5564

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The Yucatans, like the ancient Greeks, the ancient Romans, Jesus Christ, and the early saints, wore Medieval European clothing and had the same style of architecture. Historians explain these phenomena by saying that people back then had a more tenuous grasp of reality, and did not care about giving accurate descriptions. This is the same reason why ancient maps had forests and greenery in places which today are deserts, or why the maps had illustrations of dragons swimming in the ocean. I am not prepared to accept that people were retarded until around 1750, and suddenly brightened up. There is more to the story in my view and I look forward to helping to uncover the greater picture.
 

mythstifieD

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Historians explain these phenomena by saying that people back then had a more tenuous grasp of reality, and did not care about giving accurate descriptions.
Yes. They were such terrible, sloppy artists back then. Certainly didn't care for minute details.

6-raphael-paintings[1].jpgBASSEN,_Bartholomeus_van,_Renaissance_Interior_with_Banqueters,_1618-20[1].jpg

They were pretty awful writers back then too! They liked to keep their words simple and their plots easy to follow, so not to confuse their audiences...

s-l300[1].jpg
 

ISeenItFirst

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Yeah, and they keep changing the bible for 'readability' yet by any modern metric the KJV is far more readable by far less educated people.

None of then people in that art look Mayan to me. I didn't think Aztecs got as far north as the Yucatan, but history is not my strong suit.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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I see this disturbing trait, that no 16th and early 17th century publications show Native Americans in accordance with their cliche appearance.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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They look kindof Italian to me.
Another interesting thing I noticed. Looking at the image you posted reminded me of my previous experience with pre Columbian Americas.

It appears that all the major geographical names appear all at once. At least I did not notice any progressive movement as there should be during explotarions and such.

Also the names make no sense, for everything else gets named similar to Santa Maria, or Domingo or whatever. Yet we end up with Hondurases and Guatemalas. Bizarre...
 

Hardy

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I have translated the first three pages into a halfway modern German but unfortunately it is not enough for the automatic translation into English.The font is difficult, the spelling is different, the grammar is strange.In addition this weird telegram style of the text.Yes the text describes quite emotionlessly the sacrifice of children. I find the way of the writing style very simple, without any intellectual or moral claim. In short, this is also disturbing.
I am not finished yet but the city with the 5 gates is called...hold on ...great Venice....on German 'Groß Venedig':

gross venedig.png



1)… to King Mathozoma who is heart/of the great Venice/and the most powerful king/…

2) In the same lake there is a large city…scriptures call it great
Venice…/and great venice has 5 Portals

3) The captain/of the spaniards/make peace with the king
Madozoma/Lord of Great Venice

4) .../The water runs in all alleys/ big Venice/

5) ...The city of great Venice is exceptionally rich in gold and cotton goods and honey.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Thank you Hardy. I wonder what scriptures Cortes is referring to.
 

Hardy

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My mistake ,sorry.It's not 'scriptures' in Point 2 but Christians -
'Christians call it Venice', but slowly I get used to this ornate writing.More will follow..
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Why would Cortes word it like that? Was he not a Christian himself? He speaks like Christians were a separate group.
 

PrincepAugus

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Why would Cortes word it like that? Was he not a Christian himself? He speaks like Christians were a separate group.
Maybe a different sect of Christianity from the Catholicism that Cortes is affiliated too? I mean Spain was predominately Catholic then.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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I wonder what other Christian sect could be present in 1520 Tenochtitlan, simultaneously with Cortes and a bunch of his Catholics.
 

PrincepAugus

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I wonder what other Christian sect could be present in 1520 Tenochtitlan, simultaneously with Cortes and a bunch of his Catholics.
The only thing I can think of, now that I looked it up, are Early Christianity or another Semitic religion that was mistaken for Christianity. I believe that all major ancient cultures at least had reached some parts of America, especially with humongous wooden ships which I will make an post soon.
 
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