Can you answer five questions asked by Mark Sargent?

KorbenDallas

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#1
Can you answer five science based questions asked by Mark Sargent? Apparently, a physicist at Georgetown University was unable to answer those five.



Questions 1, and 2
transcription - courtesy of @whitewave
Question 1: Long Distance Photography.
"The mainstream science formula for the curvature of the earth is 8 inches/mile squared. An easy comparison would be the rate of 32 feet/second/second. So 8"/mile/mile. Two miles is 2 x 2= 4x8" or 32. Three miles is 3x3=9x8 or 72 and so on. At 50 miles the curvature is 50x50x8, coming in at over 1600 feet of curvature. And yet with HD cameras we can pull boats back into frame that are well beyond visual range. Not only does the new technology clearly show it's not a mirage but the same objects can be viewed in infrared, and targeted ship to ship by beam radar. Can science explain this? They had no answer."

Question 2: Vaccuum vs. Gravity.
"The force of a vacuum is measured in units of torr. Even a low-level vacuum can overcome gravity here on the surface. In building molecule-free chambers for the manufacturing of electronics, a series of massive pumps are needed to create a 99% vacuum. That's negative 9 torr. And for the remaining 1%, horsepower isn't enough. It can only be achieved by a chemical leeching process. That being said, how is the negative 10 torr vacuum of space not ripping off the atmosphere of this world? What is gravity? And remember, there are gases that already defy it like helium, hydrogen, and flurocarbons. Is it more logical to suggest the atmosphere is being contained in a pressurized, contained system? They had no answer."
 

humanoidlord

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#2
could you transcribe them pls?
i don't want trash videos flooding my recommended youtube tab
 

dreamtime

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#4
I wanted to look them up but the pathetic music prevented me from enduring the full 17 minutes right now. If someone can extract the questions, I would be interested if there is one that can't be answered coherently by the concave earth model. I doubt it. The second question which I quickly overheard is about his claim that the earth atmosphere is a sign of a pressurized, enclosed system, and he's definitely right there. The only reason that flat earth can poke some holes in the official cosmology is because lots of things only make sense in a concave earth.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#6
I think the main point there that the spherical model is failing. Concave or flat is irrelevant when we consider the general concept of hiding the truth.

I personally would like a definitive answer from a dogmatic scientist about the inconsistencies related to curvature/visibility. This superior mirage nonsense is getting old.

Will hold my judgement for all I have seen is videos and testimonies. Yet pretty soon will be a proud owner of P900, and will verify for myself.
 

BStankman

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#7
Sad music is for the death of the Enlightenment science ideas, hopefully.
Questions are good. Then it turns into FE celebrity masturbation.

edit. I owe Mark Sargent an apology. His videos have 200 views.

The question the establishment message behind this is fantastic. And also the spiritual one.
But I don't trust anyone who wants to be a leader in this movement.
It might be like the Laurel Canyon Military Psi Op of the 60's.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#8
I’m just trying to understand curvature vs. visibility issue there. And as long as it is supported by multiple other circumstancial issues, the science has a few questions to answer. So far they came up with a “superior mirage.”
 

whitewave

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#9
Question 1: Long Distance Photography.

"The mainstream science formula for the curvature of the earth is 8 inches/mile squared. An easy comparison would be the rate of 32 feet/second/second. So 8"/mile/mile. Two miles is 2 x 2= 4x8" or 32. Three miles is 3x3=9x8 or 72 and so on. At 50 miles the curvature is 50x50x8, coming in at over 1600 feet of curvature. And yet with HD cameras we can pull boats back into frame that are well beyond visual range. Not only does the new technology clearly show it's not a mirage but the same objects can be viewed in infrared, and targeted ship to ship by beam radar. Can science explain this? They had no answer."

Question 2: Vaccuum vs. Gravity.

"The force of a vacuum is measured in units of torr. Even a low-level vacuum can overcome gravity here on the surface. In building molecule-free chambers for the manufacturing of electronics, a series of massive pumps are needed to create a 99% vacuum. That's negative 9 torr. And for the remaining 1%, horsepower isn't enough. It can only be achieved by a chemical leeching process. That being said, how is the negative 10 torr vacuum of space not ripping off the atmosphere of this world? What is gravity? And remember, there are gases that already defy it like helium, hydrogen, and flurocarbons. Is it more logical to suggest the atmosphere is being contained in a pressurized, contained system? They had no answer."

Well, I've answered my own question about whether I'd make it as a medical transcriptionist. I wouldn't. This is a PITA but there's 2 questions for you all. I'm going to take my chances and finish watching the video.
 

whitewave

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#11
Mind you, I'm not out on the roof every night with a telescope staring at the skies but the one thing I can't get my head around is: on those nights when I am on the roof with a telescope staring at the skies, all I see are round spheres, not flat pancakes. Is Earth the only planet that's flat and everything else is round? That makes no sense whatsoever. I wonder if Mark Sargent has encountered that question and what might be his answer to it?

@KorbenDallas-aw shucks. :)
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#12
I don't know what you see up there. In my case it's just shiny things that I see. But below is an interesting video. Once I get my own P900, I will be able to either confirm or deny for myself.

A few shots taken with a Nikon Coolpix P900 from Dallas Texas in October 2016. Decent quality considering being in the city. Celestial bodies captured include: Venus, Vega, Mars, Neptune. No CGI here! ***Update: The star labeled as Neptune is probably a star that was close to Neptune in the sky on this particular evening and I unfortunately do not know the exact name :)
Real Planets and Stars (Nikon P900)
Sure looks different from NASA’s
 
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KorbenDallas

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#14
Yup, much better videos. Moon is a different story. Everything else looks like a circle of shimmering light.
 

PrincepAugus

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#15
Supposingly, they're supposed to be reflecting the sunlight. Though how bright must the sun be to reflect light from even distant lights?! Bar the diffraction from Earth's atmosphere as well.
 

humanoidlord

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#16
Question 1: Long Distance Photography.

"The mainstream science formula for the curvature of the earth is 8 inches/mile squared. An easy comparison would be the rate of 32 feet/second/second. So 8"/mile/mile. Two miles is 2 x 2= 4x8" or 32. Three miles is 3x3=9x8 or 72 and so on. At 50 miles the curvature is 50x50x8, coming in at over 1600 feet of curvature. And yet with HD cameras we can pull boats back into frame that are well beyond visual range. Not only does the new technology clearly show it's not a mirage but the same objects can be viewed in infrared, and targeted ship to ship by beam radar. Can science explain this? They had no answer."

Question 2: Vaccuum vs. Gravity.

"The force of a vacuum is measured in units of torr. Even a low-level vacuum can overcome gravity here on the surface. In building molecule-free chambers for the manufacturing of electronics, a series of massive pumps are needed to create a 99% vacuum. That's negative 9 torr. And for the remaining 1%, horsepower isn't enough. It can only be achieved by a chemical leeching process. That being said, how is the negative 10 torr vacuum of space not ripping off the atmosphere of this world? What is gravity? And remember, there are gases that already defy it like helium, hydrogen, and flurocarbons. Is it more logical to suggest the atmosphere is being contained in a pressurized, contained system? They had no answer."

Well, I've answered my own question about whether I'd make it as a medical transcriptionist. I wouldn't. This is a PITA but there's 2 questions for you all. I'm going to take my chances and finish watching the video.
1: no, we can't, we can only see what is in the horizon with a camera, we can't overcome earth curvature
2: if we can stand without floating away, it means that gravity is strong wich is the case here in earth
I don't know what you see up there. In my case it's just shiny things that I see. But below is an interesting video. Once I get my own P900, I will be able to either confirm or deny for myself.



Real Planets and Stars (Nikon P900)
Sure looks different from NASA’s
use a telescope
if you use a camera, of course you will only see a faint glowing disc, you need powerfull equipament to solve the details
 

humanoidlord

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#18
A super easy question for you then. How many miles away is the horizon when looked at over a body of water?
depends, sometimes you can see pretty far due to atmospherical abberation, other times dust makes seeing the horizon hard
 

whitewave

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#20
I remember learning in school that the furthest anyone could see out on a boat on the ocean was 7 miles. Recently read in some official science paper that it's 25 miles. Either we had some really stupid teachers or humanity's eyesight has greatly improved.
 
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