Can anyone guess who this very famous warrior was?

Jim Duyer

Well-known member
Messages
233
Reactions
586
I will provide the answer along with evidence of each word that is spoken, in a pure and literal translation, but for now, could you please give me your guess as to who said this?

Observe now that I, Me, Himself,
(and no other gods with me)
dead and yet alive,
severely wounded and yet I heal,
and nothing can be snatched from out of my grasp.

Arrows drunken with blood,
and sword devouring flesh from bloody wounds
from pierced prisoners, (torturing wounded prisoners)
and loose the hair of enemies heads. (scalp)

When I lifted up my hand towards the winds and said "live",
I became everlasting.

So for clues we have someone who had died and come back to life, had been badly wounded and healed himself, a bloodthirsty sort who tortured captive prisoners of war and took their scalps, and was able to make himself immortal simply by raising his hand towards the skies. Sounds like Sargon the Great, Alexander, Nimrod?
Perhaps some early Greek or Roman god, or a Scythian prince?
 
OP
Jim Duyer

Jim Duyer

Well-known member
Messages
233
Reactions
586
Wow, right off the bat, someone who has actually read the Tanakh. Moses was reporting it, along with his side-kick, but the words come directly from the mouth of Yahwey/Jehovah.

The King James version starts out with : [I will make mine]
but these words do not exist in the original text in Hebrew which is:
On the left is the Strong's number, then the actual letters, pronunciation, and definition

7937 Shin Kaph Resh (pronounced shakar)
to be or become drunk, drunken
2671 Hhets Tsad (pronounced chets - the hh is like the ch in Bach) arrow, dart, shaft, a wound inflicted by an arrow,
4480 May Yad Nun (pronounced min)
from, out of, kind, among, with, since, at, for, therefore, than, at,
1818 Dal Mah (pronounced dam)
blood, bloody, bloodguilt, usually blood become visible - as from a wound.
9007 CONJUNCTION: and, and therefore, also, then, yet
2719 Hhets Resh Bet (pronounced chereb)
waste or sword, Sword-a weapon used to lay waste a city, Waste - a dry or desolate place, Sword, knife, dagger, axe [Sword as devouring]
0398 Al Kaph Lam (pronounced akal)
eat, devour, consume [of a sword: devour, slay]
1320 Bet Sin Resh (pronounced basar)
flesh - the skin and muscle or the whole of the person, also meat as food, feast with meat. metaphorically this also means the human race, a signification which is taken from flesh.
4480 May Yad Nun (pronounced min)
from, out of, kind, among, with, since, at, for, therefore, than, at,
1818 Dal Mah (pronounced dam)
blood, bloody, bloodguilt, usually blood become visible - as from a wound.
2491 Hhets Lam Lam (pronounced chalal)
pierced, BUT KJV has slay, wound, profane, kill
root word comes from pierced, flute (drilled holes), bore, anything that is bored through, perforated or drilled.
This is spun by using peirced through, hence mortally wounded
by Gesenius in his Hebrew and Chaldee definition.
9007 CONJUNCTION: and, and therefore, also, then, yet
7633 Shin Bet Yad (pronounced shibyah)
captive, prisoner, state of captivity, body of captives
4480 May Yad Nun (pronounced min)
from, out of, kind, among, with, since, at, for, therefore, than, at,
7218 Resh Al Shin (pronounced rosh)
head, head of human being, the top of the body, a person in authority or role of leader, the top, beginning or first of something
6546 Pey Resh Ayin Hey (pronounced parah)
revenge - in the sense of letting loose, long hair as let loose, Gesenius, in his Hebrew and Chaldee Definitions: says this indicates (1)hair or (2) a leader or commander of an army based on the root of this word, but in every case it means "loose, hair, to uncover or let go, long hair as let loose, or revenge in the sense of letting loose"
I take this as revenge, but in the form of taking or loosening the long hair off the head.
0341 Al Waw Yad Bet (pronounced oyeb)
Enemy or enemies
 
OP
Jim Duyer

Jim Duyer

Well-known member
Messages
233
Reactions
586
i wonder what the world would be like today if he had seen a therapist.
Yes, that might have helped! Thanks for taking this the right way and not being offended by
my post. I was attempting to show that we really need to look at the original author's work,
and decide for ourselves what he said, and not depend upon the translations of others, who,
unfortunately, sometimes read something into it, or stretch the meaning to fit their hopes.
 

Top