Cahokia and the Mississippians, Early America, 1000-1540 AD

NowhereMan

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I'm wondering if this might be puzzle piece we are looking for. I'm still in the process of researching it, but here is a quick rundown:

The Missippian civilization existed from roughly 800 AD to 1600 AD, and flourished from the southern shores of the Great Lakes at Western New York and Western Pennsylvania in what is now the Eastern Midwest, extending south-southwest into the lower Mississippi Valley and wrapping easterly around the southern foot of the Appalachians barrier range into what is now the Southeastern United States.

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The largest city was Cahokia, located directly across the Mississippi River from modern St. Louis, Missouri, and is believed to be a major religious center. At it's peak from 1050-1200, Cahokia was larger than many European Cities, including London. Archaeologists estimate the city's population at between 6,000 and 40,000 at its peak. If the highest population estimates are correct, Cahokia was larger than any subsequent city in the United States until the 1780's.

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Cahokia, center for the people known as the Mississippians, settlements ranged across what is now midwest, eastern, and southwestern united states. Maintained trade links with communities of the Great Lakes to the north, Gulf Coast to the south. Mississippians pottery and stone tool in Cahokian style found at the Silvernale site near Red Wing, MN. Materials and trade goods from Pennsylvania, the Gulf Coast, and Lake Superior have been exavated at Cahokia.

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Hernando De Soto was instrumental in contributing to the development of a hostile relationship between many Native American tribes and Europeans. When his expedition encountered hostile natives in the new lands, more often than not it was his men who instigated the clashes. Mississippian culture did not survive european contact.

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I find it interesting that Chilaga would have been within the trading network of the Mississippians, and earily similar is that both Chilaga and Cahokia were next to quite long rivers on maps

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Lo and behold, it is thought Cahokia's decline was due to a massive Mississippi River flood (mud flood?) around 1200 AD (plus or minus 80 years) due to the discovery of a silty layer 7.5 inches thick.

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Any additional input or research on Cahokia would be greatly appreciated.
 

Red Bird

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St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project

The St. Louis metropolitan area, with a population of about 2.8 million, faces earthquake hazard from distant large earthquakes in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones, as well as a closer region of diffuse historical and prehistoric seismicity to its south and east. Also, low attenuation of seismic energy in the region (seismic energy carries further with less weakening of the signal than in the western U.S.)...

Local Geologic Variations Affect the Earthquake

Structures located in the Missouri and Mississippi River floodplains will likely experience stronger ground shaking and a greater likelihood of liquefaction. Below St. Louis, bedrock

I’m on an earthquake hobby horse but it is near the new Madrid fault.
 

Holonautalex

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This is all fascinating stuff!
Almost a decade ago an archaeologist friend invited me on a hike across Missouri to visit Cahokia. I had no idea what they were talking about, but I like adventure, so off we went. Surprisingly, the gigantic mounds were completely undeveloped & unguarded. I expected a gate with park rangers charging admission after hearing my friend talk about how amazing the ancient civilization was that once lived there. It looked no different than the picture here.
We camped undisturbed for several days there. Every morning we would walk to the top of the highest mound to see the Sun rise. You can see the St. Louis arch very clearly from there, despite technically being in Illinois. There is a meager exhibit & a visitor's center with a few artifacts. Mostly they talk about "Monk's Mound" where some abbots made wine. A whole lot of documentation on that! (Never mind its laughable insignificance in comparison to its surroundings.)

Another neat feature is "Woodhenge". Although there is no stone in the area, the Cahokians constructed some giant monuments of astronomical significance similar in layout to Stonehenge. All but the buried bases of posts have since rotted, but they stand reconstructed where the archaeological evidence indicates they once were.

My archaeologist friend was enthusiastic about the idea that the mound builders were descendant from a prior civilization in Central America which was also responsible for constructing ziggurat structures. After the collapse of that civilization, some of the survivors traveled North, bringing their stepped-pyramid ideas with them. Without any stone to be quarried near their new settlement, they made due with dirt. Eventually they succumbed to collapse themselves after grain-based agriculture & economic oligarchies left the majority of the population malnourished & destitute.

Coincidentally, a few days ago a friend who is into writing sent me this link asking about it in relation to my trip there. I don't know anything about the author or the site it is on, but I thought it was a cool spooky short-story in a Lovecraft sort of way. It also pertains to the idea of an underground cavernous ecumenopolis a la Xibalba or Agartha, which seems to be a relevant idea in this community. Fiction can sometimes have some truth in it, so I thought I'd share.
Gateway to the West
 

Ishtar

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This is all fascinating stuff!
Almost a decade ago an archaeologist friend invited me on a hike across Missouri to visit Cahokia. I had no idea what they were talking about, but I like adventure, so off we went. Surprisingly, the gigantic mounds were completely undeveloped & unguarded. I expected a gate with park rangers charging admission after hearing my friend talk about how amazing the ancient civilization was that once lived there. It looked no different than the picture here.
We camped undisturbed for several days there. Every morning we would walk to the top of the highest mound to see the Sun rise. You can see the St. Louis arch very clearly from there, despite technically being in Illinois. There is a meager exhibit & a visitor's center with a few artifacts. Mostly they talk about "Monk's Mound" where some abbots made wine. A whole lot of documentation on that! (Never mind its laughable insignificance in comparison to its surroundings.)

Another neat feature is "Woodhenge". Although there is no stone in the area, the Cahokians constructed some giant monuments of astronomical significance similar in layout to Stonehenge. All but the buried bases of posts have since rotted, but they stand reconstructed where the archaeological evidence indicates they once were.

My archaeologist friend was enthusiastic about the idea that the mound builders were descendant from a prior civilization in Central America which was also responsible for constructing ziggurat structures. After the collapse of that civilization, some of the survivors traveled North, bringing their stepped-pyramid ideas with them. Without any stone to be quarried near their new settlement, they made due with dirt. Eventually they succumbed to collapse themselves after grain-based agriculture & economic oligarchies left the majority of the population malnourished & destitute.

Coincidentally, a few days ago a friend who is into writing sent me this link asking about it in relation to my trip there. I don't know anything about the author or the site it is on, but I thought it was a cool spooky short-story in a Lovecraft sort of way. It also pertains to the idea of an underground cavernous ecumenopolis a la Xibalba or Agartha, which seems to be a relevant idea in this community. Fiction can sometimes have some truth in it, so I thought I'd share.
Gateway to the West
Thank you so much for sharing... This story hits a lot of my major interest points (alt archeology, St Louis, occult conspiracies, underground cities) and now I have a new favorite website 😆
 
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