Burning Books, Erasing Memories

Raviolli

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Re-writing books with lies would be even easier with technology now merging with reality.
I just read about OpenAI which was developed by elon musk but unreleased to the 'public' which can make up random unnoticeable lies
news post
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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As sad as it is to think of all the history we've lost from millions of books being burned throughout the world, what really creams my corn is that it's still being done. It's not just stolen history; it's stealing history as we speak. Digitizing books online makes the con job instantaneous and ongoing. I think I mentioned that some of the books I've seen digitized online have blank pages almost covering whatever was on the page we're not supposed to see. Those in charge on putting books online must be in a hurry because they're not careful to completely cover up the forbidden pages and their shoddy workmanship is obvious. You still can't read whatever was covered up but you can tell it IS covered up.

There's also the library of marine research that's being destroyed. It's supposed to be digitized for online availability and the taxpayers paid for all that research but it's being thrown into trash bins. Some of the librarians are risking their jobs to dig what they can out of the dumpsters but they can't get all of it and they have nowhere to store it in their houses and don't know what to do with it now that they have what little they could recover. When those people die, their families will put all that research in a yard sale or just throw it away. And that's just one library that we know about where that sort of behavior is taking place. Who knows how many others are being destroyed that we don't know about?
 

fgmngh

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Was reviewing this staggering list of burned libraries today. It goes hand and hand with the destruction/looting of national museums, such as what happened during the Iraq invasion and most recently in Brazil.
Well, the subject of stolen antiquities gets really really strange when you start to really break it down, even in the surface level through news articles.
Artifacts looted during the Iraq invasion turned up in the house of an Islamic State leader
July 15, 2015

The United States handed over more than 400 ancient artifacts to Iraq on Wednesday, part of ongoing efforts to repatriate the country’s looted heritage. But this latest batch has a particularly intriguing back story — the antiquities were seized by U.S. Special Operations forces members as they raided the house of a leader of the Islamic State militant group.

The nighttime operation to capture the militant took place in eastern Syria in May, and the Delta Force troops did not come back with their prize. It was their first such ground mission in the country, and their main target, a man known as Abu Sayyafwho ran oil operations for the Islamic State in the area, was killed in an ensuing firefight.

But as the commandos scoured the compound for documents and laptops that could provide intelligence about the organization, they stumbled across artifacts thought to be dating back as far as 4,000 years.

Among the items found in the house were three Babylonian stone seals, which officials said were stolen in 2003 from the National Museum of Iraq in Baghdad during the chaos that followed the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Their museum numbering is still visible.
Iraq investigating 'stolen artifacts' at the Louvre Abu Dhabi
November 13, 2017
Iraq says 15,000 artefacts have been looted since the US-led invasion in 2003, including statues and treasure from the Akkadian era (2161-2371BC).

The Iraqi government is investigating reports claiming stolen antiquities from the country are on display at the newly opened Louvre Abu Dhabi museum, officials in Baghdad said on Monday.

The alleged stolen artefacts date back to various historical periods in Iraq and were reportedly lootedin the chaos that followed the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003.

"Parliament will file a motion with the government to form a committee to investigate how they reached the UAE and take legal action to repatriate them to Iraq," MP Sadeq Rassoul of the ruling National Alliance told The New Arab.

An official at the office of Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, however, said Baghdad cannot be sure whether the Iraqi antiquities in Abu Dhabi were looted during the invasion or were replicas.

"A committee has been formed to follow up the subject, and verify the reports claiming Babylonian, Assyrian, Akkadian and Ottoman-era artefacts are being shown at the museum," he said.
[Now for Sale on Facebook: Looted Middle Eastern Antiquities
May 9, 2019
Ancient treasures pillaged from conflict zones in the Middle East are being offered for sale on Facebook, researchers say, including items that may have been looted by Islamic State militants.

Items for sale include a bust purportedly taken from the ancient city of Palmyra, which was occupied for periods by Islamic State militants and endured heavy looting and damage.

Other artifacts for sale come from Iraq, Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia and Libya. The majority do not come from museums or collections, where their existence would have been cataloged, Dr. Al-Azm said.
And the dang wacky one...
Hobby Lobby to pay $3 million fine, forfeit ancient artifacts
Hobby Lobby agreed to forfeit thousands of artifacts from modern-day Iraq and pay a $3 million fine to resolve a civil action the Justice Department brought against the company, according to court documents.

The DOJ said the company received the falsely labeled artifacts from a United Arab Emirates-based supplier.

The artifacts, ancient cuneiform tablets and clay bullae, were smuggled into the United States through the United Arab Emirates and Israel, Justice officials said. Cuneiform is an ancient system of writing on clay tablets that was used in Mesopotamia, and clay bullae are balls of clay on which seals have been imprinted.
There is also a completely different eye to view all this with available as well. The hiding of history, the reocculting of our human origins. Makes sense too, since you can't burn stone constructions in the desert with "random outbreaks of fires through towns" so you ransack it, destroy the people's understanding of their past, and all we are left with is mythos, barely any statues or monuments to further the importance of the word remembered.

There's a reason why all religion stems from this area, all the maps of the past that show us something different than we know now deal heavily with that area. There's a reason why the first person to bring new chronology to the forefront as much as fomenko could was from Russia. There's a reason why the tartarian connection fits with the world over yonder (from the us of a over here), and I suppose I'm just rambling now.
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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Vox Popoli: Less intelligent, but more ignorant
Where will all the books go?

When Yale recently decided to relocate three-quarters of the books in its undergraduate library to create more study space...
It's a sad day when college students have to protest to keep books in their library. I've noticed in my frequent trips to the library that books have qualitatively declined even in the past 5 years. Lots of Danielle Steele and Louis L'Amour on the shelves. Nothing of substance worth reading. (Sorry if you're a fan of Danielle Steele or Louis L'Amour). No historical photographs or photos of anything available.

I mainly go to the library to work on the book I'm writing and to attend the beekeepers meeting once a month. The library has become a recreational center for latch-key kids during the summer and after 3pm on school days. Forget trying to study or read quietly. Those days are gone. Librarians are babysitters. It's bad enough that after 3pm on school days, there's a police officer permanently stationed in a corner of the library til closing time to quell the rowdies and run off the vagrants.
 

Paracelsus

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Posting while drunk, I'll cop to this immediately. Because, yes, I'm a few beers deep today an feel like drunk posting.

There is a massive digital push to censor "controversial" media as we speak. Whatever constitutes Aryan heritage is being eradicated currently. Runes (Elder Futhorc/Armanen) is being eradicated by the current culture which is a Khazarian/Ashkenazi Jew push to combat the remnants of Atlantean/Hyperborean culture I which I count myself. I'd wouldn't count myself a "Neo-Nazi," but, I'd wholeheartedly call myself an Aryan. I'm Irish/Italian with Grey eyes and my people are all Celtic/"Native American." From an extremely early age I was aware of "Ancient Egypt" and was mystified by places like Giza, Karnak, Thebes, Memphis, Abydos on a pre-vebal level. These places spoke to my soul.

I, like most people knew there was something we weren't educated about. A lineage connecting us to the most ancient origins of humanity. "They" wanted us to forget, to accept an explanation that isn't sufficient to describe the majesty of what we can see with our own eyes. Structures that we know aren't merely burial structures, but are something else entirely.

This world is my world, this history is all of our history. There were giants, there IS magic that exists here - and always has. History hasn't just been stolen, there are those that are currently trying to steal it. I won't let them, no matter the personal cost to me. Because, again, THIS IS MY WORLD! Not theirs, MINE.

If what I say is "anti-Semitic" so be it. Along with racist or sexist. If I'm the "bad guy," so be it, I must know the world as it is.

The guiding wisdom of great cultures that existed before mine was this:

Gnothi Seauton (Know Thyself)

Know yourself, know this world, know in general. We strive to know - especially the WHY. Why are we here and to what purpose?

Mudfloods and floods. Why?

Why is history being occulted?

To what end does it serve, WHO does it serve?

Is a rank-and-file consumer better than a knower, a true Gnostic?

To peer beyond the veil of Maya should make us all more comprehensive beings. No matter the cost.
 
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whitewave

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And at one time people actively sought to pierce the darkness of ignorance and they wrote down what they learned, observed, and experienced. Who will we be if all the "unacceptable" material is destroyed and only the official narrative exists? Who will we be if we quit searching for truths because we're sure we've already found them?
 

Red Bird

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I mainly go to the library to work on the book I'm writing and to attend the beekeepers meeting once a month. The library has become a recreational center for latch-key kids during the summer and after 3pm on school days. Forget trying to study or read quietly. Those days are gone. Librarians are babysitters. It's bad enough that after 3pm on s
Ah- that’s it. When I was looking up my hometown post office turned library, I noticed all the pictures on the little website were of kids. The rooms shown had indoor/outdoor carpeting and fabric room dividers. I used to love it because of a sweeping staircase, old wood shelves railings with heavy wooden reading tables, and marble floors- and of course books. I wondered if all that was ‘sold’ (to Mason mayor most likely) and ‘modernized’. I’m not sure though.

I am realizing I live in an area where we don’t have to have security guards everywhere, and that might be different.
 

SuperTrouper

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My wife takes our daughter to the local library most weeks for whatever kids' activities. She's done this for a long time. I totally agree that public libraries are becoming increasingly like activity centres for kids, which is not bad in itself, but defeats the main purpose. On a related note, I am an academic and have an office full of books, there are around 400 on the shelves, but I am becoming an exception. Gone are the days when academics' offices were full of books. When I take a stroll down the corridor, there are a couple of people with lots of books on the shelves and the rest are barren. Take the "digitalisation" (google books, audible, etc) trend coupled with "minimalism" and you have this result. To be honest, in my academic research I can literally find anything I need online and can't remember the last time I went to the university library (I don't do archival research anyway). It feels a bit sad, but the trend seems to be to remove books from people's lives.
 

Red Bird

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My wife takes our daughter to the local library most weeks for whatever kids' activities. She's done this for a long time. I totally agree that public libraries are becoming increasingly like activity centres for kids, which is not bad in itself, but defeats the main purpose. On a related note, I am an academic and have an office full of books, there are around 400 on the shelves, but I am becoming an exception. Gone are the days when academics' offices were full of books. When I take a stroll down the corridor, there are a couple of people with lots of books on the shelves and the rest are barren. Take the "digitalisation" (google books, audible, etc) trend coupled with "minimalism" and you have this result. To be honest, in my academic research I can literally find anything I need online and can't remember the last time I went to the university library (I don't do archival research anyway). It feels a bit sad, but the trend seems to be to remove books from people's lives.
This is all true. We got rid of a lot of our books but kept some like ‘how to’, gardening, cook books (which is an excellent example of preserving history and using fat : ) also many recipes online are wrong somehow- I double check), history, and a few others. I don’t know many people with any books/shelves in their house now. Preppers do, plus dedicated iPads.
 
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whitewave

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I've donated van loads of books to my local library (they occasionally have book sales). Still, I have so many books that when we got homeowners insurance, I requested "replacement value" on the policy and they told me I'd have to reclassify/rezone my house as a library to get replacement value should the house burn down or blow away. I mainly keep reference type books on the shelves these days but I do occasionally (as time permits) enjoy diving into a new subject and reading everything I can about it.

It grieves me to see books of quality, style, and thoughtfulness disappearing from the shelves to be replaced with fluff, filler, and low-brow drivel. No one ever starts a conversation anymore with "read any good books lately?" Are the intellectual writings being gathered somewhere safe or are their memories just being totally obliterated? Is it in preparation for a reset of history with a new narrative?
 

Paracelsus

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I've donated van loads of books to my local library (they occasionally have book sales). Still, I have so many books that when we got homeowners insurance, I requested "replacement value" on the policy and they told me I'd have to reclassify/rezone my house as a library to get replacement value should the house burn down or blow away. I mainly keep reference type books on the shelves these days but I do occasionally (as time permits) enjoy diving into a new subject and reading everything I can about it.

It grieves me to see books of quality, style, and thoughtfulness disappearing from the shelves to be replaced with fluff, filler, and low-brow drivel. No one ever starts a conversation anymore with "read any good books lately?" Are the intellectual writings being gathered somewhere safe or are their memories just being totally obliterated? Is it in preparation for a reset of history with a new narrative?
Most people don't even watch cerebral television. I've quit asking about what book they are reading, they aren't, and most perceive it as patronizing.

Either you are hyper-literate or aliterate in the modern world. I've totally given up explaining my research to normies. Now I just regale people with David Paulides Missing 411 stories and how I've heard the forest go silent.

Salacious sells, substance is met with glazed over eyes and blank stares. They never even had to burn the books in the end, they just made people too dull-witted to read them.
 
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whitewave

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Salacious sells, substance is met with glazed over eyes and blank stares. They never even had to burn the books in the end, they just made people too dull-witted to read them.
Sad but true. Still, one can hope for better days (and better people) and do all that is within one's power to preserve what history and culture we have.
The human spirit truly is indomitable (for now) so I read, collect and preserve books and try to instill in others the sense of wonder and adventure, as well as knowledge, that comes from reading. Now that I know (thanks to this site) that libraries regularly "cull" their books and send them to be pulped, I've asked my local librarians to contact me anytime they intend to do this to let me have my pick of what they consider trash. Their response was they they precede their final destruction of books by having book sales. What doesn't sell gets scrapped.

The last book sale I attended left me both disappointed and thrilled because there was a fellow bibliophile who had 10 sacks of books he'd bought. I felt a little forward and inappropriate introducing myself and giving him my phone number but it's rare to meet like-minded people in the world and to have one in the same town is just too good an opportunity to pass up. I was disappointed because I didn't get the 10 sacks of books but thrilled that another bibliophile did. He never has called, btw. :) Was hoping to introduce him to this site.
 

milhaus

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Sad but true. Still, one can hope for better days (and better people) and do all that is within one's power to preserve what history and culture we have.
The human spirit truly is indomitable (for now) so I read, collect and preserve books and try to instill in others the sense of wonder and adventure, as well as knowledge, that comes from reading. Now that I know (thanks to this site) that libraries regularly "cull" their books and send them to be pulped, I've asked my local librarians to contact me anytime they intend to do this to let me have my pick of what they consider trash. Their response was they they precede their final destruction of books by having book sales. What doesn't sell gets scrapped.

The last book sale I attended left me both disappointed and thrilled because there was a fellow bibliophile who had 10 sacks of books he'd bought. I felt a little forward and inappropriate introducing myself and giving him my phone number but it's rare to meet like-minded people in the world and to have one in the same town is just too good an opportunity to pass up. I was disappointed because I didn't get the 10 sacks of books but thrilled that another bibliophile did. He never has called, btw. :) Was hoping to introduce him to this site.

Nice thread, but it is devastating as well. I am still collecting.
My theory on how the author knew you were giving so many of their books away was because enough people wrote to them about you. Otherwise, it is really spooky. :)
 

Paracelsus

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Sad but true. Still, one can hope for better days (and better people) and do all that is within one's power to preserve what history and culture we have.
The human spirit truly is indomitable (for now) so I read, collect and preserve books and try to instill in others the sense of wonder and adventure, as well as knowledge, that comes from reading. Now that I know (thanks to this site) that libraries regularly "cull" their books and send them to be pulped, I've asked my local librarians to contact me anytime they intend to do this to let me have my pick of what they consider trash. Their response was they they precede their final destruction of books by having book sales. What doesn't sell gets scrapped.

The last book sale I attended left me both disappointed and thrilled because there was a fellow bibliophile who had 10 sacks of books he'd bought. I felt a little forward and inappropriate introducing myself and giving him my phone number but it's rare to meet like-minded people in the world and to have one in the same town is just too good an opportunity to pass up. I was disappointed because I didn't get the 10 sacks of books but thrilled that another bibliophile did. He never has called, btw. :) Was hoping to introduce him to this site.
The books that pertain to the type of information "we" are interested on this site would never meet such an ignominious end. They wind up in the clutches of the Vatican or other private collections and guarded with intense resolve. Those who understand the value of information would never deprive themselves of information that could enrich themselves to everyone else's detriment.

I'd assume there is a parallel civilization that exists simultaneously with ours of which they are the sole beneficiaries of advancements made within both. We receive a doctored or possibly even entirely fabricated version of events that stands in contrast to REAL reality.

Our books may even be laughable or useless in respect to what reality is. What use would an antique version of Thucydides' History of Peloponnesian War be if the man never even existed in the first place? All of these august tomes of wisdom could be spectacular examples of councils of historians who know the REAL history and fabricate a convincing fictional history.

Who could possibly know?

Someone would appear psychotic if they suggested this. But, could you imagine if there was even the slightest credence to this hypothesis?

I feel that I could write a fictional account of history that could stand as truth. Most people are terrifyingly ignorant. Even talking to grey-hairs, when I tell them that FOIA documents were released that confirm Tonkin Gulf was a false flag operation by the Navy and C.I.A. they don't understand what I'm saying. They were alive and experienced events that occurred two decades before I even existed, yet lack any cognitive recollection for my statement.

I saw people transfixed like catatonic zombies on 9/11 while I walked into my high school library at around 10am. It was spectacle for sheep while I was watching the reactions objectively. Why were these idiots rendered cognitively immobile?

It was less terrorism and more religious spectacle. A Deus ex Machina for simpletons that a book which exists within a different civilization would honestly appraise.
 
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