Bradford and other Tartarian cities of the north

davboy

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Originally I started to write about this topic in another thread; French invasion of Russia but for some reasons of synchronicity became involved in a discussion on my home town in England; Bradford. I began to notice the unique architecture from the 19th century, particularly in a district called Little Germany; largely demolished. My father now 92 lived there in the Irish enclave in his childhood and was then moved to what is now the 'Asian enclave.' What strikes me now as I look at the world news is the prevalence of 'Tartarian' architecture everywhere in the world from the 19th century and a century of catastrophes and migration.
In the main, research into this topic is mainly focused outside of the UK and I would like to use this thread to look at places in the UK. I really think the questions as to who and why are staring us in the face with some amongst us having the answers. It takes me back to the radio/book/film of the "Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy" and the work of Slartie Blartfast and Norway.
Sorry if this is a little vague and if others could focus me a little more on Bradford for a start, I would be grateful

Bradford Impresses

was sent to me by a fellow Bradfordian; Bear Claw and makes for interesting reading.

One question I asked is where did all the stone come from seemingly all at the same time
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It's as if the station had just been ripped out – Forster Square
this is as a ps from the report noted above
 
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Bear Claw

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Apologies if I misled you. I am actually from Northampton, however, I have ancestoral roots from around Bradford way.

My thoughts thus on this are quite general, rather than specific.

Firstly with regards to the North of England (for non-British people, this is anywhere from the Midlands up). There is a narrative that it had a golden age during the Industrial revolution. This resulted in the architecture of many towns being defined as industrial (although in many instances a kind of grand and impressive industrial).

Industrial Revolution/Victorian architecture

The standard logic for this is new production techniques, and increase in cheap labour, an empire to supply raw materials and export to, allowed for a rapid change in the economic make-up. Based around the Birmingham Enlightenment (which could make an interesting separate thread, one of the worlds least talked about but most influential 'enlightenments' FWIW, anywhere I see the word 'enlightenment' is a bit of a red flag to the possibility that something funny is going on).

Midlands Enlightenment - Wikipedia

Nonetheless the rapid speed of the industrial age coupled with dubious 'facts' such as the population growth tells us that something does not mathematically add up:

Mathematics of the Past

I would suggest the possibility that the narrative of the Industrial revolution is in essence the British narrative to explain away the past. Whereas America has fires, discussed in the Battlefield America thread, Britain only has a few major fires.

(The two biggest ones I believe are the great Fire of London and the great Fire of Northampton (the great fire of Northampton is an odd one, as no-one really appreciates the historic importance of Northampton - it was capital of UK before London (capital of Mercia at some points), and would have been the capital if the two civil wars had gone the other way (in fact the decisive battles of both civil wars was in Northamptonshire. Further more the gunpowder plot was a Northamptonshire conspiracy, the first crusade left from Northampton castle, which was later sleighted as punishment, plus a general history of writing over the past that far exceeds similar towns in the UK - read Alan Moore's Jerusalem novel which is based around the loss of history and past in Northampton (I won't include the Bradford football stadium fire in this list!).

Furthermore I think just a general erasure of history (the amount of 'sleighted castles' in the UK is staggering. If you have just won a war, why would you sleight fortresses you could use to defend yourself???)

Anyway, I think the industrial skeletons of the North are a smoking gun to the previous civilisation.

As are the Greco-Roman / Tartarian architecture of Bath / Central London etc.

Where did all the stone come from is a massive mystery. I always wondered, there are a few people who have posted (can't remember where) about the petrification of stone process. Whereby wood turns to stone over thousands (?) of years. What if a civilisation was in possession of technology that could speed this process up to barely anytime? Would explain the intricate adornings for sure...
 
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davboy

davboy

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What an 'enlightening' reply, another shiver down my spine:rolleyes: This site is the tops. I'm going to Bradford in July to see very aging father and ask around. Cathedral, University etc. Is anyone around want to join me?
Also thinking about the canals,who dug them, where did all the dirt go? How much 'stone' was used? Where did it come from? Also the dry stone walls? Started to read Jerusalem a few years back but got stuck, time to start again. Waiting for more contributions
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A little bit more rambling; Wiiliam Bradford was one of the first governors of the so called Plymouth pilgrims elected in 1621 according to mainstream history (Google) yet it was only in1823 that the City of Bradford was founded in Pennsylvania near to New York State; at the time of the construction of the City Hall in Bradford USA the population was only 10,000 (see attached).
York another Yorkshire city with its famous York Minster and the statue of Constantine, an amazing Viking and Roman history which I am also looking into.

Bradford, Pennsylvania - Wikipedia

William Bradford and the First Thanksgiving [ushistory.org]
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Apologies if I misled you. I am actually from Northampton, however, I have ancestoral roots from around Bradford way.

My thoughts thus on this are quite general, rather than specific.

Firstly with regards to the North of England (for non-British people, this is anywhere from the Midlands up). There is a narrative that it had a golden age during the Industrial revolution. This resulted in the architecture of many towns being defined as industrial (although in many instances a kind of grand and impressive industrial).

Industrial Revolution/Victorian architecture

The standard logic for this is new production techniques, and increase in cheap labour, an empire to supply raw materials and export to, allowed for a rapid change in the economic make-up. Based around the Birmingham Enlightenment (which could make an interesting separate thread, one of the worlds least talked about but most influential 'enlightenments' FWIW, anywhere I see the word 'enlightenment' is a bit of a red flag to the possibility that something funny is going on).

Midlands Enlightenment - Wikipedia

Nonetheless the rapid speed of the industrial age coupled with dubious 'facts' such as the population growth tells us that something does not mathematically add up:

Mathematics of the Past

I would suggest the possibility that the narrative of the Industrial revolution is in essence the British narrative to explain away the past. Whereas America has fires, discussed in the Battlefield America thread, Britain only has a few major fires.

(The two biggest ones I believe are the great Fire of London and the great Fire of Northampton (the great fire of Northampton is an odd one, as no-one really appreciates the historic importance of Northampton - it was capital of UK before London (capital of Mercia at some points), and would have been the capital if the two civil wars had gone the other way (in fact the decisive battles of both civil wars was in Northamptonshire. Further more the gunpowder plot was a Northamptonshire conspiracy, the first crusade left from Northampton castle, which was later sleighted as punishment, plus a general history of writing over the past that far exceeds similar towns in the UK - read Alan Moore's Jerusalem novel which is based around the loss of history and past in Northampton (I won't include the Bradford football stadium fire in this list!).

Furthermore I think just a general erasure of history (the amount of 'sleighted castles' in the UK is staggering. If you have just won a war, why would you sleight fortresses you could use to defend yourself???)

Anyway, I think the industrial skeletons of the North are a smoking gun to the previous civilisation.

As are the Greco-Roman / Tartarian architecture of Bath / Central London etc.

Where did all the stone come from is a massive mystery. I always wondered, there are a few people who have posted (can't remember where) about the petrification of stone process. Whereby wood turns to stone over thousands (?) of years. What if a civilisation was in possession of technology that could speed this process up to barely anytime? Would explain the intricate adornings for sure...
Hi come to a little dead end need some help with alternative accounts of the uk civil war?
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yes
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yes
 
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