Black Plague (Black Death Hoax)

WorldWar1812

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It did exist the so-called "Bubonic Plague" in the middle ages?


Black Death - Wikipedia
Bubonic plague - Wikipedia

Historically we have been told so. Main timeline comes along 14th century, this was to be the original context of (under my point of view),a fabricated hoax, that was repeated several times next centuries. The main reason I see is not in contemporary times of those events, but after "illumination" (french illustration movement or encyclopedia, rewritting his-tory), a reason to hide weather knowledge and consequences of that to the common people.

If you research this subject properly you'll find an extraordinary correlation between "plague" outbursts and famine events.

List of famines - Wikipedia

1328–1330 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland Europe
1330–1333 Famine France
1333–1337 China
1339–1340 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland Europe
1344–1345 Famine in India, India
1346–1347 Famine in France, Italy and Spain Europe <<<<< GREAT FAMINE, BLACK PLAGUE OUTBURST
1349–1351 Famine France <<<<<<<<<<<<<
1351 Famine England <<<<<<<<<<<<<
1358–1360 Famine France
1369 Famine England
1371 Famine France
1374–1375 Famine in France, Italy and Spain Europe
1374–1375 Famine Egypt

The "original outburst" was due to a ship coming to Genova (Italy) from "BLACK SEA" (aham, aham...). We have several bad harvests not only in Europe, but silk road trading failures. And by the same time we have the richest granary of Alexandria out of the christian european control (mameluks, tartaria, did you notice correlation
between lukemoryie and mameluke?).

Alexandria - Wikipedia


"The 13th-century Mongol conquest of China caused a decline in farming and trading. However, economic recovery had been observed at the beginning of the fourteenth century. In the 1330s, a large number of natural disasters and plagues led to widespread famine, starting in 1331, with a deadly plague arriving soon after.[14] Epidemics that may have included plague killed an estimated 25 million Chinese and other Asians during the fifteen years before it reached Constantinople in 1347."

Well, as you see prior and immediately before "the outburst" in Europe, we have famines, war conflicts (mogol or tartars or whatever you wanted to name it, as it'seasy to blame always in the same direction), we have a ship coming from "BLACK SEA" to spread the "BLACK PLAGUE" in Europe. We have, then, the silk road and all the benefits for the european traders (Genoa, Sicily, Venice), in risk to be lost. We have famines what increases pirates in the mediterranean, we have either in continental europe famines and people usually have the bad habit to steal for food instead of dying.

So who knows if these clever people thought about this story in order to protect the merchant ships and food trading.
Genoa came first, but Venice (nest of the black nobility), most sophisticated people in Europe then (people related to jews, jesuits, templars, financial control system -Il Moro Di Venezia- Shakespeare), and who later will move to another maritime commercial cities in the north (Amsterdam, Antwerp, London), came along with this a bit
after.


plague doctors


beefeater crow guardians


It's needed to point a few questions about what the disease was, as it hasn't been ever clarified the symptoms and how the plague was or wasn't really contagious. The idea of a contagious disease it's an hypothesys set as official as far as late 19th century, but as I have shown you (history it's writen and rewriten from time to time, Bizantine Empire as Fomenko told, is a term born in 19th century either), if you see the documentary above, it has been largely explained and shown it has anything to do with indian and chinese late 19th century bubonic disease compared to "black death" of middle ages. No contagious link, no rats, different symptoms in many cases, so it's clear if you make a decent research on this, the legend of the europe middle ages black plague has a lot of weak and unexplained flaws.

The main health issue symptome was described as "bubonic" is a little swollen and inflamed ball, usually backward in the neck, or under axillas. In fact these inflamated balls are usually placed in the inguinal in site of axillas.
There are some paintings of Saint Roch (showing these buboes), saint patreon of the black plague damned.

A Medieval Painting Depicts the Chilling Image of a Worm Eating Its Way Out of the Body of a French Saint

This is important because modern theory of "black plague" researched on the indian case (late 19th century) shows these buboes in the inguinal side, and these paintings are the only in the renaissance times showing the same symptoms. On the contrary, taking Bocaccio and another sources, the main traditional symptoms on the black death comes to sores. pustules and skin ulcers in the whole body.


Related to previous asian plague in the 1330-1340s we have to point astronomical events (comets), sometimes comets will bring you a pestilent big gaseous clouds (that can be there for days), with very high toxic gases and it's been historically reported the link between comets, bad omens and children mortality (remember the biblical story of Herodes and the killing of innocents, or killing of all of the children under 2 years age old).



Going back to symptoms, let me show you some pictures catalogued as "black death". Remember I told you the real history behind it's the times of solar minimum, very bad harvests, combined to poor importation of food (due to wars or any other political problems), which led europe to the "Black Plague" (by the other hand an ingenious
way to keep people out of the food sources, and to control the population's territorial movements).



Triumph of Death Bubonic Plague Art -







This is what historically we have been told graphically about "black plague".





Jesus and the Lepers




Association with rats it's easy to see, but has anything to do.



Can We Stop Blaming Rats for the Black Death?
Post automatically merged:

As I referred on other posts 14th century Greenland was abandoned (weather climatic changes involving colder weather in Europe as Alaska ice plate was being moved to Greenland).

Little Ice Age - Wikipedia

1250 for when Atlantic pack ice began to grow
1275 to 1300 based on the radiocarbon dating of plants killed by glaciation
1300 for when warm summers stopped being dependable in Northern Europe
1315 for the rains and Great Famine of 1315–1317

There again, remember we have several names in the mixing of this legend, because bubonic plague, should be in fact different to black death, sores in the whole body or even leprousy.

"Contemporary accounts of the plague are often varied or imprecise. The most commonly noted symptom was the appearance of buboes (or gavocciolos) in the groin, the neck and armpits, which oozed pus and bled when opened.

Boccaccio's description:

In men and women alike it first betrayed itself by the emergence of certain tumours in the groin or armpits, some of which grew as large as a common apple, others as an egg...From the two said parts of the body this deadly gavocciolo soon began to propagate and spread itself in all directions indifferently; after which the form of the malady began to change, black spots or livid making their appearance in many cases on the arm or the thigh or elsewhere, now few and large, now minute and numerous. As the gavocciolo had been and still was an infallible token of approaching death, such also were these spots on whomsoever they showed themselves.

The only medical detail that is questionable in Boccaccio's description is that the gavocciolo was an 'infallible token of approaching death', as, if the buboe discharges, recovery is possible."


You can see all these images, and nowadays diseases related mainly to lack of certain vitamins (lack of fruits and vegetables as it happens when you have cold weather and bad harvests), but in general lack of vitamins of what we suppose very bad diet in most of the people in the europe of 14th century.

Pellagra - Wikipedia










Beriberi. Causes, symptoms, treatment Beriberi






Leprosy - Wikipedia



You see pelagra effects and the "Black Death" in the superstitious conscience of europeans of that age. You see beriberi, and some other skin diseases that are simply the alarm the body shows you to remind you to get a better diet.

"Renewed religious fervour and fanaticism bloomed in the wake of the Black Death. Some Europeans targeted "various groups such as Jews, friars, foreigners, beggars, pilgrims",[63] lepers,[63][64] and Romani, thinking that they were to blame for the crisis. Lepers, and other individuals with skin diseases such as acne or psoriasis, were singled out and exterminated throughout Europe."


The documentary linked above it's really good, showing a lot of explanations on the contradictions on this contro-versial history called "Black Plague", for instance there aren't any kind of rodents in northern areas compatible to explain the contagious theory. I tell you, all this was about a very clever people controlling the food trading.

As well for the religious institutions had a value of people's control not only through food, but obviously as it happens nowadays controlling the conciousness and beliefs, reinforcing some dogmas about collective behaviour and divine punishment.





Sono la morte, e porto corona......








Graham Twigg wrote a book in 1985, explaining the failures on this subject.

The Black Death
 
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Ice Nine

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Bonus points for The Seventh Seal clip.

Great thread,

The little I've looked into The Black Death, I never believed it was cause by and carried by rats. I never seem to believe anything anymore. This dying of malnutrition and famine makes much more sense.
 
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WorldWar1812

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This hoax was skillfully developed at its finest way by venetian republic merchants.






And linking this to the hospitallers order (setting the food trading under the control of these guys and their hospitals), the same "spanish america's gold and silver" never belonged to spain but templars.

Knights Hospitaller - Wikipedia


The dead corpses, were never burnt as it's supposed for a very contagious disease, but buried under collective tombs. Under official history, "black plague" came first to southern areas of europe, but had stronger mortality rates in northern europe (as you expect in those territories with poor harvests). In Cambridge in 1349 mortality rates got rocketed till above 75% (counting the people remained in the village in site going outwards to look for pure surviying), but maybe that rate it's been exagerated (empty villages as people "dissappear" looking out for food sources).



Robin Hood - Wikipedia


This official narrative "beginning first in the southern areas" has not so much credibility, but take into account, who had the power in the 14th century, and who traded and imported food (italian republics over the mediterranean world), maybe this trading collapsed first in the south (northern areas and the hansa league), anyway it has more sense thinking about mortality rates, the problem was more serious in the northern areas. One detail here gets importance it's the urban development in the south against less development in the north, and when the food supplying fails, cities falls first. Just go the the outwards.


symptoms warm fever (viral hemorrhagic plague)

Covering up or a mistake? Anyway famine and bad health condition correlates. As much as you're weak illness appears. If the disease were contagious, why affected only europe?. It seems to me the mistake possibility maybe an option, but a coverage either could have happened, and the real reason behind, simply hungry people.




There are no clues about if hungry people eating not some conventional food and meat (rotten foods) could be in the origin of the plague, not indeed facts enough to prove a real contagious plague disease. There are some rumours on cannibalism.

What do we know?. Far beyond deaths accounting, there was dramatic weather changes, colder weather, not only affecting food supply, but a wet environment (marshy lands). Just think on siberia in june, a plague of mosquitos, but then we should find any report on massive deaths in summer months not in winter.



Anthrax - Wikipedia

Most of the reports talks about fever process and pustules just before the final hour (process that could take a week, but that's the same process of any other illness in its final stage).

Another angle of the "black plague" it's about villages (bourges-burghs), with enough population and almost no sanitary measures, even blaiming of plagues to the poorest people. (bad diet plus no hygiene).

That was used again on control population purposes, restricting the moving of the people inside cities.

And you may ask, how the things comes to this way?. Just look at the skies, then switch on your tv set when the pretty girl shows you the weather news.



"high clouds" :)


In summary, no real evidencies of contagious disease, but mostly some other factors (famine, bad hygiene), as probably real causes of the "Black Plague".




Pellagra - Pictures

little ice age (history channel documentary)





The little ice age began in the early 14th century, innuit people could reach north scotland shoreline in kayaks, the thames was frozen several months per year. Atlantic ocean transportation belt was broken and several volcanic explosions happened (what suggests magnetic shift affecting the whole planet).
Desperation and fear drove people to irrational acts. Furious storms destroyed the harvests, hysteria led to witches hunting first and finally to the outburst of violence in the French Revolution.

"Black Plague" accomplished the role in the official history, to explain the facts but avoiding to show so much the rough and real causes.
 
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Red Bird

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There have been very recent reports of bubonic plague in Wyoming. It’s very unpopulated there but you know how everything is blown up for drama (and other reasons- see measles) now. No drama about these cases. Most would think it’s because we have antibiotics to cure it, but they don’t seem worried about it spreading through other fleas, to other states (with more fleas- the good thing about the north are bugs have to survive too) to people etc. we’re all going to die!!

However I just noticed it seems cats have been found with the fleas. All this if true, of course.
Plague - Wyoming Department of Health
Third Cat in Wyoming Diagnosed with Plague: Here's Why You Shouldn't Panic

There are, on average, seven cases of plague in people each year in the U.S., and the death rate is 11 percent, the CDC says. The infection is curable with antibiotics if caught early

It did seem to benefit the elite- all of them- in some way, as you say.
 
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Obertryn

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It certainly would explain the high mortality rate. Bubonic plague is nasty but it's not THAT deadly. People can recover from it on their own. Plus, as Red Bird pointed out above, modern doctors don't seem to consider it all that contagious.

Also, I always found the plague doctor masks bizarre, the beaks specifically. It's said those were stuffed with aromatics and were supposed to act as filters of sorts but how the hell did people back then know enough about that to design what was effectively a medieval gas mask? And why didn't their usage take off beyond that?
 

ISeenItFirst

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There have been very recent reports of bubonic plague in Wyoming. It’s very unpopulated there but you know how everything is blown up for drama (and other reasons- see measles) now. No drama about these cases. Most would think it’s because we have antibiotics to cure it, but they don’t seem worried about it spreading through other fleas, to other states (with more fleas- the good thing about the north are bugs have to survive too) to people etc. we’re all going to die!!

However I just noticed it seems cats have been found with the fleas. All this if true, of course.
Plague - Wyoming Department of Health
Third Cat in Wyoming Diagnosed with Plague: Here's Why You Shouldn't Panic

There are, on average, seven cases of plague in people each year in the U.S., and the death rate is 11 percent, the CDC says. The infection is curable with antibiotics if caught early

It did seem to benefit the elite- all of them- in some way, as you say.
Yep, not nearly as deadly as vending machine incidents, or left handed people using equipment designed for a right hander (that one claims quite a few), though.
 

BrokenAgate

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1328–1330 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland
1330–1333 Famine France
1333–1337 China
1339–1340 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland
1344–1345 Famine in India
1346–1347 Famine in France, Italy and Spain Europe <<<<< GREAT FAMINE, BLACK PLAGUE OUTBURST
1349–1351 Famine France
1351 Famine England
1358–1360 Famine France
1369 Famine England
1371 Famine France
1374–1375 Famine in France, Italy and Spain
1374–1375 Famine Egypt
So, from 1328 to 1375, there was one huge, prolonged famine that extended over Europe and Asia. I find this interesting. We are never told that the famine was worldwide, because we are taught about the histories of these countries individually. When we are taught it like that, it is easy to see all of these famines as brief, separate episodes that didn't have anything to do with each other. All these natural disasters, plagues, famines, wars, "little ice ages" (that may not have been so little)...what the smeg was going on back then?
 

whitewave

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Bubonic plague is nasty but it's not THAT deadly. People can recover from it on their own. Plus, as Red Bird pointed out above, modern doctors don't seem to consider it all that contagious.
They seem to be taking it seriously here, quarantining the entire plane of passengers, leaving them stranded in outer Mongolia. Literally. The nutritional deficit aspect is an interesting idea and entirely possible since nutritional diseases were not even known (or thought possible) until the 18th century. A lot of black slaves in America were developing a mystery disease and a doctor finally figured out that they ate mostly only corn and molasses and were in close contact with people who ate better and never developed symptoms. Once their diet was (slightly) improved, the "disease" disappeared.
It seems that the only 2 on the plane who died were the 2 who ate the marmot (which is illegal to hunt) so, if they were so desperate for food as to hunt illegal game, it's possible they suffered from nutritional deficits. They orphaned their 4 children and no mention is made of their children being affected but poor parents will often feed their children while doing without for themselves.

The one thing that makes me question the nutritional aspect is the lengthy list of famous people who died of plague, including bishops, popes, queen of England, people rich enough to go to college, etc. One assumes they had enough to eat and a variety of foods to stave off nutritional deficiencies.
 

Obertryn

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The one thing that makes me question the nutritional aspect is the lengthy list of famous people who died of plague, including bishops, popes, queen of England, people rich enough to go to college, etc. One assumes they had enough to eat and a variety of foods to stave off nutritional deficiencies.
It's worth noting that being rich enough to buy everything edible under the sun doesn't mean that you're still getting everything your body needs. For example medieval nobles and royals refusing to eat certain types of cheap fruits and vegetables because they were considered "peasant food". Or when people refused to eat tomatoes for a long time because they were considered poisonous.
 
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WorldWar1812

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What I always found interesting is that we have two great plagues seperated by around 1000 years
It seems each millenia some sort of changes happens.
This is why Hitler speech used "next 1000 years empire".

Around 500 AC (Justinian Plague)
Plague of Justinian - Wikipedia
Around 1350 AC (Black Plague)

For me it's very clear the real reason as nutritional deficiency. People not eating meat, eggs, low proteins, low vitamins not fruits, little of milk, and a lot of starch that will help fungus advance in your body, on a weak health.

Watching these photoes, "black death" is still among us......



Pellagra was took from italian (lombardia-milano), meaning dark or sour skin. (pelle-agra)



The same things happens to some fruits with fungus attack.

Citrus Black Spot - UF/IFAS Extension Pinellas County



Toxigenic process. Fungus feast inside a body full of starch (poor foods).

Maybe quarantine hospitals designed by venetians, served on the purpose (real purpose) to give a minimal and decent diet for people to recover.

By the other hand elites used the fear of a contagious disease, mixing pellagra and other diseases with the "black plague" and leprosy.

10 Bizarre Legal Cases From Medieval Europe

The Leprosy Scare Trials

"In medieval times, leprosy was thought to be highly contagious. Medieval Europeans were very paranoid about catching the disease, so lepers were shunned and segregated from mainstream society. Lepers were not only considered unclean but also suspicious and untrustworthy. In spring 1321, a story began to spread in Southern France that lepers were plotting to poison wells and infect the entire country with leprosy.[10] After everybody had become infected, the leper conspirators then would overthrow the government and take control of France. By brutally torturing lepers, the authorities uncovered that Jews and a Muslim king were in on the plot, too. Of course, the entire story was fake, but King Philip V ordered that all the country’s lepers be arrested and put on trial for treason. Hysterical mobs killed lepers with impunity, while those who actually got trials were tortured and burned at the stake. By the end of the year, when the frenzy had largely subsided, thousands of lepers had died in the massacres and trials. Nobody in power bothered to apologize until 1338, when the pope, then centered in the French city of Avignon, acknowledged that the lepers were innocent."

Eyam and the Great Plague of 1665 - History Learning Site

Anyway, nothing that couldn't be solved by fire (mainly the poorest neighborghoods).

Great Fire of London 1666.


The Roots of Persecution: a comparison of leprosy and madness in late medieval thought and society

Bad diet, infectious process and madness comes in the same pack.

In fact, some holy ecstacies had its origin in fungus and mould and poor diet.



Rye ergot fungus
Ergot - Wikipedia

No. 1037: Rye Ergot and Witches

Depending if you are in or out of ecclesiastical institutions you will end santified or burnt.

 
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Red Bird

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All very good theories!
I related how my grandfather and others, in the old days, would basically throw a match to burn out the undergrowth and how romans (or was it Greeks?) recognized how big fires rid the town of pests...
Maybe somebody just threw a match for the perceived greater good, or saw a chance to get rid of all kinds of pests.
 

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