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studytruth

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Hey everyone. Just a thought. It is all those “electric” poles we see in the photos post fire. It’s odd the survive the fire as wood poles, but it got me thinking. What were they. Then I wondered, as they generally have no wires, what if it was the new 5g equivalent that came out, perhaps just prior to the cities getting torched. No proof of anything. Just a thought as they are strange to be in the cities at all. Anyone else speculate what they are, besides the standard “free energy” lines. Which they could be, or something else.
 

RecycledSoul

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Yeah, and we are never told HOW anyone found out, or what happened to the guilty party. Not likely that someone would step forward and admit, "Yeah, I left a lit candle in my bedroom and it burninated the city. Sorry." Btw, if you want to merge my Prescott topic with this one, that's fine.
Today your ass would be dragged into court for negligence. I’m sure judges had same views about such back in those days, yet not one guilty party...
 

trismegistus

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The Great Wildfire of Peshtigo

illustration-of-peshtigo-fire.jpg


Peshtigo%20Fire%20aftermath,%20WHI%201859.jpgdclv07i04-history-peshtigo-fire-map-courtesy-of-Peshtigo-FIre-Museum.jpg

From Wiki:

The Peshtigo fire was a very large forest fire that took place on October 8, 1871, in northeastern Wisconsin, including much of the Door Peninsula, and adjacent parts of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The largest community in the affected area was Peshtigo, Wisconsin. It burned approximately 1,200,000 acres (490,000 ha) and was the deadliest wildfire in American history,[1] with the estimated deaths of around 1,500 people, and possibly as many as 2,500.
Occurring on the same day as the more famous Great Chicago Fire, the Peshtigo fire has been largely forgotten. On the same day as the Peshtigo and Chicago fires, Holland and Manistee, Michigan (across Lake Michigan from Peshtigo), and Port Huron at the southern end of Lake Huron also had major fires, leading to various theories by contemporaries and later historians that they had a mutual cause.
Coincidentally occurring on the same day as the Chicago fire, eh? Also curious that a wildfire has a higher death toll than a giant fire in a major city at the time.

I found an article in the Washington Post about it, I will post some particularly eerie accounts of this fire. The first hand source is an account written by a town Reverend. If this account is accurate, there are some interesting descriptions in here that could support an argument that there was something more to this fire than meets the eye.
I perceived above the dense cloud of smoke overhanging the earth, a vivid red reflection of immense extent, and then suddenly struck on my ear, strangely audible in the preternatural silence reigning around, a distant roaring, yet muffled sound, announcing that the elements were in commotion somewhere.
All were struggling alike in the grasp of the hurricane. A thousand discordant deafening noises rose on the air together. The neighing of horses, falling of chimneys, crashing of uprooted trees, roaring and whistling of the wind, crackling of fire as it ran with lightning — like rapidity from house to house — all sounds were there save that of the human voice. People seemed stricken dumb by terror.
The flames darted over the river as they did over land, the air was full of them, or rather the air itself was on fire. Our heads were in continual danger. It was only by throwing water constantly over them and our faces, and beating the river with our hands that we kept the flames at bay. …
I re-entered to seek the chalice which had not been placed in the tabernacle, when a strange and startling phenomenon met my view. It was that of a cloud of sparks that blazed up here and there with a sharp detonating sound like that of powder exploding, and flew from room to room. I understood then that the air was saturated with some special gas, and I could not help thinking if this gas lighted up from mere contact with a breath of hot wind, what would it be when fire would come in actual contact with it.
The hour of deliverance from this prison of fire and water had not yet arrived--the struggle was not yet over. A lady who had remained beside me since we had first taken to the river, and who, like all the others, had remained silent till then, now asked me:
"Father, do you not think this is the end of the world?"
"I do not think so," was my reply, "but if other countries are burned as ours seems to have been, the end of the world, at least for us, must be at hand."
After this both relapsed into silence.
It is a painful thing to have to speak of scenes which we feel convinced no pen could fully describe nor words do justice to. It was on the eleventh of October, Wednesday afternoon, that I revisited for the first time the site of what had once been the town of Peshtigo. Of the houses, trees, fences that I had looked on three days ago nothing whatever remained, save a few blackened posts still standing, as if to attest the impetuous fury of the fiery element that had thus destroyed all before it. Wherever the foot chanced to fall it rested on ashes. The iron tracks of the railroad had been twisted and curved into all sorts of shapes, whilst the wood which had supported them no longer existed. The trunks of mighty trees had been reduced to mere cinders, the blackened hearts alone remaining. All around these trunks, I perceived a number of holes running downwards deep in the earth. They were the sockets where the roots had lately been. I plunged my cane into one of them, thinking what must the violence of that fire have been, which ravaged not only the surface of the earth, but penetrated so deeply into its bosom. Then I turned my wondering gaze in the direction where the town had lately stood, but nothing remained to point out its site except the boilers of the two locomotives, the iron of the wagon wheels, and the brick and stonework of the factory. All the rest was a desert the desolation of which was sufficient to draw tears from the eyes of the spectator--a desert recalling a field of battle after a sanguinary conflict. Charred carcasses of horses, cows, oxen, and other animals lay scattered here and there.

The bodies of the human victims--men, women, and children--had been already collected and decently interred--their number being easily ascertained by counting the rows of freshly-made graves.
Whole forests of huge maples, deeply and strongly rooted in the soil, were torn up, twisted and broken, as if they had been willow wands. A tree standing upright here or there was an exception to an almost general rule.
Many asseverated that they had seen large wooden houses torn from their foundations and caught up like straws by two opposing currents of air which raised them till they came in contact with the stream of fire. They then burst into flames, and, exposed thus to the fury of two fierce elements, wind and fire, were torn to pieces and reduced to ashes almost simultaneously.
By computing the length of time that elapsed between the rising of the tempest in the southwest, and its subsiding in the northeast, it will be easily seen that the rate of motion did not exceed two leagues an hour. The hurricane moved in a circle, advancing slowly, as if to give time to prepare for its coming.
Hogsheads of nails were found entirely melted though lying outside the direct path of the flames. Immense numbers of fish of all sizes died, and the morning after the storm the river was covered with them. It would be impossible to decide what was the cause of their death.
It is more than probable that for a moment the air was impregnated with an inflammable gas most destructive to human life. I have already mentioned the tiny globules of fire flying about my house at the moment I quitted it. Whilst on my way to the river, I met now and then gusts of an air utterly unfit for respiration, and was obliged on these occasions to throw myself on the ground to regain my breath, unless already prostrated involuntarily by the violence of the wind. Whilst standing in the river I had noticed, as I have already related, on casting my eye upwards, a sea of flame, as it were, the immense waves of which were in a state of violent commotion, rolling tumultuously one over the other, and all at a prodigious height in the sky, and, consequently, far from any combustible material. How can this phenomenon be explained without admitting the supposition that immense quantities of gas were accumulated in the air?
Strange to say there were many corpses found, bearing about them no traces of scars or burns, and yet in the pockets of their habiliments, equally uninjured, watches, cents, and other articles in metal were discovered completely melted. How was it also that many escaped with their lives here and there on the cleared land as well as in the woods? The problem is a difficult one to solve. The tempest did not rage in all parts with equal fury, but escape from its power was a mere affair of chance. None could boast of having displayed more presence of mind than others. Generally speaking, those who happened to be in low lying lands, especially close to excavations or even freshly ploughed earth with which they could cover themselves, as the Indians do, succeeded in saving their lives. Most frequently the torrent of fire passed at a certain height from the earth, touching only the most elevated portions. Thus no one could meet it standing erect without paying the penalty of almost instantaneous death.
When the hurricane burst upon us, many, surprised and terrified, ran out to see what was the matter. A number of these persons assert that they then witnessed a phenomenon which may be classed with the marvelous. They saw a large black object, resembling a balloon, which object revolved in the air with great rapidity, advancing above the summits of the trees towards a house which it seemed to single out for destruction. Barely had it touched the latter when the balloon burst with a loud report, like that of a bombshell, and, at the same moment, rivulets of fire streamed out in all directions. With the rapidity of thought, the house thus chosen was enveloped in flames within and without, so that the persons inside had no time for escape.
Some sources have estimated the number of dead as 1,200. The

Encyclopedia Britannica

gives a total of 1,152, evidently using the figure arrived at by Stewart Holbrook in his

Burning An Empire.

However, the true total will never be known, since whole farmsteads were erased, leaving no trace, and no one knows how many itinerant workers died in Peshtigo's company boarding house or in its two churches to which many fled in panic, or in isolated logging camps deep in the surrounding woods. People simply became piles of ashes or calcinated bones, identifiable only if a buckle, a ring, a shawl pin or some other familiar object survived the incredible heat.
There is a ton of information here to parse through. The one distinction I'll make in regards to this fire compared to the others on this thread is that the Reverend observed trees being burnt, whereas in a lot of these city "fires" the foliage is strangely intact.

What is unbelievable to me is that if this account is accurate, why has no one looked further into this fire in the 150 years since its occurrence? Large black objects in the sky exploding? Deadly gas? Melted Iron?


If I didn't know any better, I'd say this was an attack on this town not a random wildfire.
 

trismegistus

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Sounds like a description of this sound to me:

The more I look into these "fires" the more I am inclined to believe that there is a high technology element to them. H.G. Wells is already known by some to be a rewriter of history, could War of the Worlds be gatekeeping the true hidden history of America in this time period? I wonder if all the reports of the hysteria caused by Orson Well's radio play of War of the Worlds was due to the unconscious "reliving" of this attack on humanity by those who were made to "forget" the true origin of this destruction. For those wondering why someone would even bother doing such a thing -- consider that exposing the truth behind an event could be seen as a karmic exercise in "atoning" for keeping the true history hidden. This is a similar concept to all of the predictive programming we see in modern TV and film.

Part of me is very hesitant to even suggest that the truth could be this extreme and based in "sci fi" but then I read this account from Rev. Peter Pernin and I can't help but go there.

Let's imagine for a moment that this is in fact true, that in the late 1800s there was an invasion of America by those who wielded high technology (perhaps human, extra-dimensional, extra-terrestrial or some combination of those) who sought to "reset" much of humanity. I could see the argument being made from those who survived that suppressing this information would be crucial to establishing order out of chaos (Ordo Ab Chao). How would it be possible to control a society who knows that there exists an otherworldly force that could wipe out cities in the blink of an eye?

Let's also not forget that in the ensuing decades of these fires you have the establishment of the Oil Oligarchy, the Federal Reserve, Income Tax, the Prussian system of education and many other examples of the chains being tightened around the necks of Americans. Remove critical thinking skills from education, create a debt-based system of slavery, and prep them for slaughter in world wars and you have a perfect formula for making sure that most don't have the ability to see the forest for the trees.

Post Script:

Notice anything tantalizing about the symbol that accompanies the 33rd Degree Masonic "Ordo Ab Chao"?

ordo_ab_chao.png
 

jd755

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The Great Wildfire of Peshtigo
Coincidentally occurring on the same day as the Chicago fire, eh? Also curious that a wildfire has a higher death toll than a giant fire in a major city at the time.

I found an article in the Washington Post about it, I will post some particularly eerie accounts of this fire. The first hand source is an account written by a town Reverend. If this account is accurate, there are some interesting descriptions in here that could support an argument that there was something more to this fire than meets the eye.

There is a ton of information here to parse through. The one distinction I'll make in regards to this fire compared to the others on this thread is that the Reverend observed trees being burnt, whereas in a lot of these city "fires" the foliage is strangely intact.

What is unbelievable to me is that if this account is accurate, why has no one looked further into this fire in the 150 years since its occurrence? Large black objects in the sky exploding? Deadly gas? Melted Iron?


If I didn't know any better, I'd say this was an attack on this town not a random wildfire.
Perhaps I'm going batshit crazy or something but given the situation this man of the cloth is describing, a biblical hell (or maybe Tartaria the level below hell), if ever there was one, how did he survive?
 

trismegistus

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Perhaps I'm going batshit crazy or something but given the situation this man of the cloth is describing, a biblical hell (or maybe Tartaria the level below hell), if ever there was one, how did he survive?
According to his account, he managed to book it to the nearby river and kept himself more or less submerged throughout the entire event.

You definitely hit the nail on the head in saying that he is describing something straight out of biblical hell. It sounded like a true apocalyptic event.
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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I wonder if all the reports of the hysteria caused by Orson Well's radio play of War of the Worlds was due to the unconscious "reliving" of this attack on humanity by those who were made to "forget" the true origin of this destruction.
Funny you say that. I just listened to the entire broadcast the other day, but ruled out anything due to it being 1930s. Your line of thinking never occurred to me. Nice.
 

realitycheck

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You gotta love the Pittsburgh Fire of 1845.

...and the flames quickly spread to several buildings owned by Colonel Diehl, including his home, and to the Globe Cotton Factory.

...Although the flames were intense, they moved slowly enough that residents had time to remove themselves and many of their belongings.
Ok, so to explain how fire wasn't put out - it spread quickly, to explain extremely low body count - it spread slowly...

I was in two major fires and when flames are intense it never moves slowly, it moves slowly in situation like when it goes towards wind but then flames are smaller and not extremely hot but when it starts to burn intensely then it spreads quickly and heat goes way up - I have been in both situations from slowly walking and spraying water from 5m distance with normal heat to having sensation that you are burning with fire 30m away and running for your life trying to escape fire.

And just by using common sense you can know you can not have intense fire which progress slowly - fire needs air and fuel and major fire needs wind to supply air (oxygen)... everyone knows how fire works you need to blow air for heat to go up.
 

jd755

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These are my thoughts feelings on the fires (not the earthquakes) being discussed here and if anyone feels I'm having a pop at them all I can say is I am not, I am simply looking at the whole phenomenon, not the individual photographs/accounts, inspired by those excellent map plottings back up the thread, attempting to identify pattern.

The deforestation of the coast led to a drying up 'wave' moving inland as the sources of rain were cut down and cleared which led to lake, swamps, marshes, streams either drying out or diminishing and the water table dropped down drying the surface even more effectively.
As the need for wood marched inland the land behind dried out and the forest soils, fungi based soils, died out meaning the land could not return to forest. The loss of the 'old growth' in mainstream parlance.

The variety of wood used in the construction is never mentioned, at least as far as I can tell and this is I feel of importance as some trees are pyrolosis trees which means they have to have fire as part of their life cycle. Dead pyrolosis trees, branches etc burn very quickly at a relatively high temperature consuming all the fuel in a short but hot burn.
These branches do not get broken down by the fungi and wood eaters present in deep wet forest soils which are simply missing in pyrolosis forest areas.
As the deforestation went on the 'wet' forest the buffer to the pyrolosis trees burning habit were logged out and the loggers then went after the pyrolosis trees.
Once cut and used in construction/decoration/furniture each piece became a very effective firelighter and unlike the pyrolsis fire in nature there are no wet trees, soils and tree produced rain to keep it from spreading just a large mass of dried out 'wet tree wood' which means becomes a hot fire storm that is extremely destructive until all the fuel has gone.

The other thing with these pyrolosis trees they reach harvestable size far quicker than the wet trees lower down as they do not live as long so the need for wood meant they were brought down from their ridges, mountain sides and planted low down to provide fast grown timber for construction purposes (the 200 year tree 'barrier') thus increasing the 'risk' of fire in all buildings even brick built buildings if the floors and joists were pyrolisis at least in part, all of the wood inside it would be consumed in feeding the fire. As the roof has massive timbers in it the odds of them being low level pyrolosis timber to me is quite high in buildings where brick has replace wood framing/cladding.

Another pattern is the aftermath of the fires sees a massive reduction in the number of title holders to the land underneath the burning. Many small title holders are financially ruined and more financially wealthy title holders buy them up real cheap then build real big and its the wealthy who have fire insurance not the little guys.
The cleared areas are often redeveloped very quickly and very profitably.

It feels as though there is a deliberate routine to these fires with many of the people involved 'in on it' which is why the source is 'established' so quickly, the newspaper reports appear to have 'all the answers' and the death toll is small to non existent, essentially its a proven pattern that can be rolled along from city to city and each made to appear disconnected from each other by media manipulation so 'invisible' to the people of the day but visible to the people of the future, if you get my drift.

The other pattern that jumps out is the 'no more new wooden buildings' tale the written stories tell and the 'brick buildings utterly destroyed' tale the photographs tell. The two bear no relation to each other and sadly from most if not all of the photographs it is impossible to identify the places of the devastation from today's perspective and all there is is the wordage either on the picture or under it that provides the identification.
The fact most of these photographs are held in 'public records' and not private, especially 'online versions' is of relevance to the pattern.
A nine story mill for example was placed in Charleston and Richmond as KD discovered so the pictures of the devastation of brick buildings could actually be one event photographed from many different angles and there is no way to actually know where and when the shoot was carried out.

One thing that just popped in whilst posting this bundles of sticks/twigs over here called faggots, burn very quickly and in a confined firebox like those found in tile ovens reach 800 degrees centigrade on average no matter what variety of tree is used, as long as they are dry. If this were known back in the day, and I see no reason why not, a faggot thus confined in a pipe or open end basket or inside a roll of carpet/leather or simply a wooden box with its end knocked out and placed in a good draught would ignite easily and disappear completely. An ideal firestarter if ever there was one.
 

Maxine

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I wonder if all the reports of the hysteria caused by Orson Well's radio play of War of the Worlds was due to the unconscious "reliving" of this attack on humanity by those who were made to "forget" the true origin of this destruction.
I must say that even i feel something that feels like familiarly eerie and scary to it when i listen to these sounds of Tripods, can't really describe that feeling with words but i never felt that way to pretty much anything in any movies or video games or e.t.c. So it could also be some generational subconsciousness remembering something.
 

Ice Nine

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I must say that even i feel something that feels like familiarly eerie and scary to it when i listen to these sounds of Tripods, can't really describe that feeling with words but i never felt that way to pretty much anything in any movies or video games or e.t.c. So it could also be some generational subconsciousness remembering something.
The Tripods are creepy and spider like. That movie has always creeped me out. And yeah just the noise alone is bad enough. Along with Invaders From Mars. Where the main creature is like a spider/human/octopus type deal.

invaders.jpg
I have the same thoughts when it comes to the inordinate amount of humans who are afraid of spiders and snakes. It seems such an irrational fear, they are so small compared to us, yet instill such fear in people. Maybe in one of our go rounds we were either ruled by or taken over by/attacked by, oh boy, spider like beings or Snake People. It does sound wacky, but it has always intrigued me.
 

Bear Claw

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The Tripods are creepy and spider like. That movie has always creeped me out. And yeah just the noise alone is bad enough. Along with Invaders From Mars. Where the main creature is like a spider/human/octopus type deal.

I have the same thoughts when it comes to the inordinate amount of humans who are afraid of spiders and snakes. It seems such an irrational fear, they are so small compared to us, yet instill such fear in people. Maybe in one of our go rounds we were either ruled by or taken over by/attacked by, oh boy, spider like beings or Snake People. It does sound wacky, but it has always intrigued me.
Good point. Or maybe in a previous flood apocalypse, the survivors had to go underground. Where it was dark and there were snakes and spiders. And then these fears have survived in the genetic memory of the race. Would also explain peoples aversion to water, especially the sea
 

SonofaBush

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Hey everyone. Just a thought. It is all those “electric” poles we see in the photos post fire. It’s odd the survive the fire as wood poles, but it got me thinking. What were they. Then I wondered, as they generally have no wires...
What about this photograph? It looks to me there are wires that are difficult to see in some cases, most likely impossible in others, but they really are most likely there.

 

BrokenAgate

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In many of the photos showing the aftermath of a fire, there are groups of men in dark suits and top hats or bowlers walking around....surveying their handiwork? They don't have the demeanor of shocked, scared survivors looking through the rubble for lost valuables.
 

MinLo66

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im gonna go with dynamite. and some of the pictures have men showing freemansonry hand signs . just pay off the right people, and no one writes about the noises and explosions.
When you see the man or men with the tophats and the hidden hands standing in front of a disaster of some type, you can be assured they are showing off their "work".
 

NowhereMan

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...damage of the mainly wooden city structures...
View attachment 22255
I'm curious if there are any possible clues for us in the events of the Washburn A Mill fire of February, 1991 Minneapolis. Basically we have an olde timey building that looks like those in your picture after a devastating fire. The difference is that the ruins have been turned into a museum:

Washburn A Mill / Mill City Museum
1910 washburn A mill.jpg1976 Abandoned Washburn A Mill.jpg1991 washburn A mill fire, 1.jpg1991 washburn A mill fire, 2.jpgMill-City-Museum.jpg
Mill Ruin From Inside2_sm.jpginside burned out washburn A mill.jpeg
 
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