Astronaut plugged the hole in ISS with his finger

KorbenDallas

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This is the top level of mocking of the general public, I think. Now they plug holes in space with their fingers, and temporarily fix these holes with tape. That is in space.

Tell me it doesn't look like a drilled hole...

iss_meteor_hole_1.jpg

The leak, which was detected Wednesday night by flight controllers as the Expedition 56 crew slept, resulted in a small loss of cabin pressure. Flight controllers determined there was no immediate danger to the crew overnight. Upon waking at their normal hour, the crew’s first task was to work with flight controllers at Mission Control in Houston and at the Russian Mission Control Center outside Moscow to locate the source of the leak.


finger.jpg

When the two-millimetre slash was detected, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst reportedly put his finger over the hole to try to plug the leak.
During a live feed from the ISS, Nasa's ground control were heard to comment: "Right now Alex has got his finger on that hole and I don't think that's the best remedy for it."
Once the hole was identified, crewmembers applied Kapton tape, which slowed the leak. "Flight controllers are working with the crew to develop a more comprehensive long-term repair," NASA added. "Once the patching is complete, additional leak checks will be performed. All station systems are stable, and the crew is in no danger as the work to develop a long-term repair continues."

LOL.

International Space Station crew repair leak in Russian craft
Astronauts use gauze, high-tech tape to plug hole on ISS
Astronaut uses finger to plug hole on space station
 

ISeenItFirst

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Some snarky redditor will tell us that since it was only a 2mm hole it was fine lol. Ridiculous ISS stories yet again.
That's kinda what I think, what is the most ridiculous part?

I don't know the truth about the ISS, but I don't see any smoking gun here.

I wouldn't expect frostbite or other injury, or explosive decomp, and I thought the thing was practically made of tape anyhow.

They keep it at sea level pressure in there, 14.7 if I recall correctly.
 

dreamtime

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Sorry, but the narrative is complete nonsense.

Why do they omit the most interesting part - how they located a 2mm hole?

Why do they wait until the astronauts are awake and then suddenly it becomes so important that someone has to put his finger on it?

Why no fotographic evidence?

It's business as usual with the ISS story, I just wonder if this event will be the "highlight" of the ISS journey of Alexander Gerst this year. I had expected a bit more from this Hollywood movie.
 
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ISeenItFirst

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It’s either there is no perfect vacuum in space, or they are not in the vacuum environment.

I'm no physicist, but with those train cars, it is the atmosphere exerting force on the outside of the vessels. In space, you only have the interior pressure to provide the force, and there just isn't that much force there.
 

LordAverage

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Yea unfortunately no details came to light of what it felt like on his finger. I know the ISS is like 100m x 73m or something, a pretty big thing (well y'know, supposedly it is really flying around in low earth orbit or w/e they call it) so a 2mm hole is very tiny on that scale but cmon

Consider, for example, the International Space Station (ISS). Without thermal controls, the temperature of the orbiting Space Station's Sun-facing side would soar to 250 degrees F (121 C), while thermometers on the dark side would plunge to minus 250 degrees F (-157 C).Mar 20, 2001

That's what quick google search suggests. Either way sounds very painful. The hole should still put a nice mark on your finger or something at those temps right.

Will never be mentioned again probably.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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LOL, some space ninjas penetrated the ISS.

The Russians are trying hard to get this entire thing go away. In the process they make themselves look real stupid, I'd say. Apparently they claimnow, that they drilled that hole when the segment of the ISS was still on Earth.

Google translation: ISS was punched while in Russia
 

LordAverage

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They said it was a micrometeorite striking the ISS before (at least it was their best guess)

They couldn't tell it was drilled or a man made hole that was done on earth before now? Seems like you should be able to tell them apart.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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It almost looks like they have a running scenario of events which are supposed to hsppen, and with this one they overdid it.

While we are being sidetracked with where the hole came from, the real questions are not bring asked.

1. How the ISS was able to fly at 5 miles per second with a 2mm drilled hole in its shell for as long as that specific segment was up at lower orbit. Of course allrgedly it was duck taped with some powerful tape. Right.

2. Why the sucking power of the space vacuum did not pulll that dumb astronaut’s finger out. A regular vacuum cleaner tube gets attached to one’s hand quite nicely at 600 Torr. What is a 2mm suction at 10-6 Torr going to do to ones finger? Space vac is 16600 times more powerful.
 

ISeenItFirst

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1. Why shouldn't it fly with a hole? I don't see the problem. I'm sure you're not worried about aerodynamic drag in space?

2. This is not how vacuums work. Vacuums don't suck, pressure pushes. His finger wouldn't be under any more force than the missing piece of shell would have been.
 

ISeenItFirst

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1. I routinely miss your point. I thought you meant that it shouldn't be able to move, or that fast, with the hole. Now I think you meant, how did it go unnoticed for what could have potentially been a really significant amount of time.

Thanks for the link, it was helpful, but I think the answer is the same. It just wasn't that big of a deal.

By those calculations (which I find suspect, but probably bear out, some terms need better definitions, but I can't be bothered so I'll assume is accurate), it took 6 minutes for a spacecraft 1/93 the size of the ISS, with a hole 25 times the size of the one on the ISS, a full 6 minutes to lose half the pressure contained. This does not account for any additional pressure generated by those systems on board, which would be attempting to maintain pressure by adding air mass. Clearly, by these calculations, we are orders of magnitude away from catastrophe.

We are not talking explosive, or even rapid decompression here. It's a slow leak in a tire.

2. Our difference of opinion was not obvious to me, but as always I'm open to a different perspective. I'm interested in your opinion on the matter. I believe force comes from mass, and there is no mass to a true vacuum. The energy that expels the gas through the hole, is the energy stored in that gas as pressure.
 

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