Are Ancient Pipe Organs being destroyed?

KorbenDallas

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Now and then, some interesting pointers show up in my e-mail. This time we are being offered to look into various Church, Cathedral, Chrystal Palace type fires. Apparently one of the possible reasons for those "fires" could be the need to destroy Pipe Organs. This is a completely new one for me. I guess my "to do" list has just become a bit longer.
pipe_organ_1.jpg

Posting this to see whether our forum members have anything related/relevant to add here.
 

WarningGuy

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Now and then, some interesting pointers show up in my e-mail. This time we are being offered to look into various Church, Cathedral, Chrystal Palace type fires. Apparently one of the possible reasons for those "fires" could be the need to destroy Pipe Organs. This is a completely new one for me. I guess my "to do" list has just become a bit longer.

Posting this to see whether our forum members have anything related/relevant to add here.
I think that is exactly why these places all get burnt down. Eric Dollard has an excellent video on the subject. If you don't know of the man and not seen these videos before then it might pay to watch 6 or so of the videos in the series. I will put the full play list at the bottom but some have been doubled up.


Some think he is crazy but if you ask me the man is Nikola Tesla 2.0

 

Witchcraft

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I had an obscure thought after reading this thread - if the majority of churches are built on top of sources (whatever it is and however its done) of energy and the church organs are some sort of disguise/cover. Would there be a build up of energy over time that has to be released that causes these fires? I know I'm not making sense so I'll get to the reason I'm posting now - I decided to help by grabbing a list of church fires. I started here and I noticed straight off there's quite a lot of churches that have have quite a few fires over the centuries, I'll give you a couple of examples just from France...

Chartres Cathedral – The present building is the latest of at least five structures destroyed by fire and war, with documented events in 858, 962 and 1020. After the 1020 fire the basis of the present cathedral was begun. In 1134 the town suffered a fire, which may have damaged the cathedral. A fire destroyed the east tower in 1194, leading to the reconstruction of the nave and choir. A lightning strike in 1506 destroyed the northeast tower, leading to its replacement in flamboyant Gothic style. A further fire in 1836 destroyed the lead-covered roof. Its replacement was undertaken in iron.

Rouen Cathedral – Its immediate predecessor was struck by lightning in 1110. An early version of the present church burned on Easter in 1200. It was struck by lightning in 1284. The main spire blew down in 1353. More lightning strikes took place in 1625 and 1642. A fire in 1727 damaged the choir roof. A replacement spire was destroyed by lightning in 1822, and was replaced with a neo-Gothic spire. Two aerial bombings in 1944 damaged the church, the second destroyed the roof, the north tower and much of Rouen by fire.

Anyway, just popping this here as I'm certain I'm gonna end up getting completely absorbed in this tonight. If I find anything interesting I shall report back.

Last bit of random nonsense I promise (for now) - aside from money, one thing that churches encourage you to bring is candles. Steady supply of free fuel right there in the past, to feed/ignite whatever the 'free energy system' (if indeed there was one) was. Also (promise broken already, sorry!) tales of perpetual flames from the past - one of my favourites - St Brigid of Kildare who shares her name with a celtic goddess - Brigid "In the Christian era, nineteen nuns at Kildare tended a perpetual flame for the Saint, which is widely believed to be a continuation of a pre-Christian practice of women tending a flame in her honour." There's more about a strange 'whistle/humming' sound she invented, but now I'm just papping. Pretty sure I read somewhere that men would go 'insane' if they crossed the wall leading to the fire or something like that. Can't find it at the min and I'm supposed to be shutting up....

Best wishes,
 

WarningGuy

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Well, there could be additional things in the burnt buildings. If the organs are indeed the target, we should see another one at the Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral.
Down towards the bottom of the link you provided it reads to me that the pipe organ at Notre Dame is not the original which might explain why it survived the fire. It has also been extensive modified over time as well.

Notre Dame had organs before Cavaillé-Coll, who in the 19th century built on the one that had last been extensively revised by François-Henri Clicquot a hundred years before him. Until the early 20th century, the organ was almost completely mechanical in construction — the keys and pedals connected directly with “trackers” to the valves that let air into the pipes to make them speak, with some assistance from air-pressurized levers powered, as the windchests under the pipes were, by assistants using foot pumps.
Over the years, various changes were made. Electric action was installed in the 1960s to replace the trackers, but it needed repair in the 1980s, and in 1992, with great fanfare, computer technology was installed, at a cost of $2.2 million. The digital system was designed to play back whole compositions for the performer, and even to produce scores from improvisations.

“The technology worked on and off for a while after the dedication, but never completely reliably,” Jean-Pierre Leguay, one of the cathedral’s organists, told me in 1995, when I was Paris bureau chief of the New York Times. “It broke down in the middle of a concert,” he said then, “and we stopped using the organ at all for a while.”
The team of organ builders who had installed computers and microprocessors to interpret the data from sensors under the keys and transmit instructions to the valves in the windchests went back to work.
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There is also this about the organ that goes a bit more into the history of it and its builders .
Notre Dame Cathedral Fire: The Historic Organ Survived
 
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