79 A.D. no more: Pompeii got buried in 1631

DylanDog

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As part of Operation Avalanche in the summer and autumn of 1943 and in the beginning of 1944 Allied bombed the archaeological site of Pompeii, whose ruins were badly damaged by a series of bombings carried out by American and British fighters for a total of 162 bombs. Significant destruction occurred throughout the site, and some of Pompeii's most famous monuments, as well as its museum, were struck. After the war, many of the structures were rebuilt with the help of American and British team of experts. The "renovation" of Pompei started in 1944 and continued for more than 15 years.

The 3rd September 1943 Italy signed the armistice with the allies. Americans were in Pompei at the end of September 1943. Vesuvio erupted for the last time in March 1944.
17404
 

whitewave

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Apparently, Pompei is where we lose Pliny the Elder as he heroically jumped up from his nap to go investigate the strange clouds, received a distress call from a personal friend (how the friend could get the message/messenger through the fires, skull-crushing pumice shooting from the sky, smoke, and choking ash but not get themselves through is not answered) and promptly mobilizes his navy to start rescuing survivors. (How does an encyclopedist/lawyer have command of a navy?) One account has him rescuing exactly one personal friend (not the one sending the distress call) and other accounts have him rescuing up to 2,000 people. One account has him rushing into the heat and smoke and being overcome with sulfurous fumes only to die on the shore and another account says he made it safely back home with his friend and went back to his nap dying a day or two later.

And out of an entire region of dead people, scientists think they've found our poor Pliny's remains. There's a picture with this link but it doesn't look like the mandible belongs to the top portion of the skull. And it looks too big for the skull. And it could belong to anybody. At any rate, the remains were identified speculatively in the early part of the 20th century but no one was willing to spend the money for lab testing. They're willing now but are awaiting your donation (crowd funding) at which point I have no doubt the scientists will come up with conclusive DNA that Pliny surely left on file somewhere. sarcasm

There's a long history of backdating events (and genealogies) to give an air of stability or authenticity. Backdating documents/histories of various sorts continues to this day resulting in all sorts of legal suites. This seems to be a practice that has been carried over from antiquity (however long ago THAT was).

Backdating dictionary information "Shakespeare is the first known user of a lot of words, but, many of these are now being backdated, as we do more research."
Backdating euthanasia authorization "This authorization was backdated to September 1, 1939, to suggest that the effort was related to wartime measures."
Backdating pedigrees "The same backdating applies to the designation for extended families."
Backdating historical events and personalities "Lots of backdating (to hide the real history), lots of complex inter-forgeries, and all the rest."

What would be the purpose of backdating the Vesuvius eruption? I have no idea. Give the thieves time to pick through the ruins for valuables since everyone else thinks it happened so long ago that nothing's left? To cover up a war technology? To conveniently bury a few made-up people in the rubble? Who knows?
 

Magnetic

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Apparently, Pompei is where we lose Pliny the Elder as he heroically jumped up from his nap to go investigate the strange clouds, received a distress call from a personal friend (how the friend could get the message/messenger through the fires, skull-crushing pumice shooting from the sky, smoke, and choking ash but not get themselves through is not answered) and promptly mobilizes his navy to start rescuing survivors. (How does an encyclopedist/lawyer have command of a navy?) One account has him rescuing exactly one personal friend (not the one sending the distress call) and other accounts have him rescuing up to 2,000 people. One account has him rushing into the heat and smoke and being overcome with sulfurous fumes only to die on the shore and another account says he made it safely back home with his friend and went back to his nap dying a day or two later.

And out of an entire region of dead people, scientists think they've found our poor Pliny's remains. There's a picture with this link but it doesn't look like the mandible belongs to the top portion of the skull. And it looks too big for the skull. And it could belong to anybody. At any rate, the remains were identified speculatively in the early part of the 20th century but no one was willing to spend the money for lab testing. They're willing now but are awaiting your donation (crowd funding) at which point I have no doubt the scientists will come up with conclusive DNA that Pliny surely left on file somewhere. sarcasm

There's a long history of backdating events (and genealogies) to give an air of stability or authenticity. Backdating documents/histories of various sorts continues to this day resulting in all sorts of legal suites. This seems to be a practice that has been carried over from antiquity (however long ago THAT was).

Backdating dictionary information "Shakespeare is the first known user of a lot of words, but, many of these are now being backdated, as we do more research."
Backdating euthanasia authorization "This authorization was backdated to September 1, 1939, to suggest that the effort was related to wartime measures."
Backdating pedigrees "The same backdating applies to the designation for extended families."
Backdating historical events and personalities "Lots of backdating (to hide the real history), lots of complex inter-forgeries, and all the rest."

What would be the purpose of backdating the Vesuvius eruption? I have no idea. Give the thieves time to pick through the ruins for valuables since everyone else thinks it happened so long ago that nothing's left? To cover up a war technology? To conveniently bury a few made-up people in the rubble? Who knows?
Back dating is used as a device to separate the reader from the nearness of the time of the catastrophe. Like the deceivers say at the Electric Universe, "There is nothing to be afraid of since these events happened long ago in the distant past and could never happen now."
 

whitewave

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Here's some quality fear-mongering that puts us all a little (lot) closer to such events. Be afraid. Be very afraid. ***rolls eyes sardonically*** This was from 3 days ago and I know there was a group of international seismologists a few years ago that did a road trip to Yellowstone because of some quake swarms that were happening at the time. I'm wondering if, instead of 630,000 years ago, this baby popped 200-300 years years ago. It's such a remote region (especially back then) that most people wouldn't even know the origin of such a disaster. Wonder if that's why it's a lowly populated area?

They give us numbers like 630,000 years ago; 79 AD, etc. I want to know how they calculate those dates.
 

RecycledSoul

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To me, the evidence of shenanigans is undeniable. The wells and pineapples seem to be the “meat and potatos”, in my humble opinion.

In the OP, an oil lamp with the Chi Rho is pictured. Not an item from first century AD. Not sure when that may have been deposited there. I’d like to know exactly where it was found. It “could” have been from the world’s first Indiana Jones type fellow early in antiquity, and before the given “discovery” date. If the disaster took place in the 1600’s, and a guy had this sitting on his dresser, it would be no different than me having antique mason jars on mine (as I do). I also have a small collection of 19th century oil lamps in my collection. I’m gonna be one of those guys that makes the next bunch scratch thier heads after the reset. :)
 

anotherlayer

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Let's not forget that Pompeii is used as a marker to accurately date other things by proving radiocarbon date testing is entirely accurate. Because:
"Berkeley -- A powerful geologic dating technique called argon-argon dating has pegged the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius so precisely that it establishes one of the most solid and reliable anchors for any dating method."
So, if they can convince all of us that Pompeii died 79AD and then they found this magical radiocarbon dating method which just so happens to prove that Pompeii died 79AD, now you have the evidence and the proof. Who could argue now with radiocarbon dating?? It nailed the burying of Pompeii to the day!
 

whitewave

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Another video by the CONSPIRACY-R-US YT channel. Pompeii and Art.

It's nice that he mentioned your work/site.

Also, something else about the paintings being buried in ash for 2000 years is suspect. "Freshly fallen ash grains commonly have surface coatings of soluble components (salts) and/or moisture. These components can make ash mildly corrosive and potentially conductive. The soluble coatings are derived from the interactions in an eruption column between ash particles and volcanic-gas aerosols, which may be composed of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid droplets with absorbed halide salts. The amount of available aerosols varies greatly between eruptions of similar size and volume."

There are no paints (being composed of organic materials mostly) that can withstand marinating for 2000 years in sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid or abrasive salts. Or water, for that matter. Water is the most effective solvent in the world so having a couple of millenium' worth of water and acids leech through the soil onto these paintings would completely dissolve the paints.
 

robbyeezy

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Been lurking for months, finally read through this thread and I made an account to share this info that I believe I saw first elsewhere on this site. This may help explain pineapples though.

I don't have anything else to share on the topic other than this:

RIO ARTIFACTS MAY INDICATE ROMAN VISIT
UNDERWATER EXPLORING IS BANNED IN BRAZIL

Edit: more googles yield more info:

Roman Head from Mexico

Found this too, can't ctrl+F "rome/roman" on my phone, but I'm fairly certain the word Roman appears at least once.
Historic Shipwrecks and Magnetic Anomalies of the Northern Gulf of Mexico
 
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RecycledSoul

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Let's not forget that Pompeii is used as a marker to accurately date other things by proving radiocarbon date testing is entirely accurate. Because:

So, if they can convince all of us that Pompeii died 79AD and then they found this magical radiocarbon dating method which just so happens to prove that Pompeii died 79AD, now you have the evidence and the proof. Who could argue now with radiocarbon dating?? It nailed the burying of Pompeii to the day!
😂 best laugh of my Monday. I needed that. Thx
 

PrincepAugus

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I really hate mainstream info videos of history, especially this one. Who would've imagined that Pompeii had the volcano erupted just in time of festivals and worship! /s

 

milhaus

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Found this article while looking for something else.
From 1903: Source
According to our history, Pompeii was rediscovered in 1748. This doesn't prove anything, obviously. Wondering what you all think?
 

Obertryn

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Let's not forget that Pompeii is used as a marker to accurately date other things by proving radiocarbon date testing is entirely accurate. Because:

So, if they can convince all of us that Pompeii died 79AD and then they found this magical radiocarbon dating method which just so happens to prove that Pompeii died 79AD, now you have the evidence and the proof. Who could argue now with radiocarbon dating?? It nailed the burying of Pompeii to the day!
Wouldn't testing the exact reliability of radiocarbon dating be really easy, though? Just take an event from a relatively recent past, like 1952 or something, where it's young enough that people can remember it happening and we have actual, solid evidence that's hard to bury and/or dispute, yet old enough to be suitable for carbon dating. Run some tests. If it works precisely, then we can say that yes, it appears to give accurate results, at least for recent events and give more proof to the phenomenon. If it is off by, say, 200-300 years or more, or gives some weird result that doesn't even make sense, then that calls the entire enterprise into question.

You can't even say that it's obviously not going to work for recent years to defend against it, at least based on my understanding of the Wikipedia page and its sources on radiocarbon dating.
 

whitewave

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Sorry, Obertryn. Common sense is not allowed. Now take your blue pill and your vaccination and go back to nodding and smiling. :)
 

whitewave

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Check this out folks:

1550s Book Illustration Proves: VESUVIUS erupts, POMPEII destroyed, PLINY killed in 1482!!

The Pompeii Thread still being discussed and even "hot" right now, I seem to be just on time with this jaw-dropping find, hahaha!! :D:giggle:
But Wiki told me this:
BornAD 23
Novum Comum (Como), Roman Italy, Roman Empire
DiedAugust 25, AD 79
(aged 55–56)
Stabiae, Campania, Roman Empire

See above post #43 for alternate place of Pliny death. Did Pliny even exist?
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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It’s not Pliny only. All of those 2k years old characters, if ever existed, lived at approximately the same time we first learned of them. That would be around the 15th century.

Then again, my personal opinion 1492=1692. Will substantiate some time later.
 

Silvanus777

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Sure, KD.

We can trust none of these dates, agreed. Same as I agree with the other notion about the various characters of antiquity.

It just blew me away to have found an old illustration just casually depicting Pliny the Elder swallowed up in volcanic flames in 1482. So I had to break my silence and share it immediately! All pieces to a big puzzle... :D(y)
 

anotherlayer

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Wouldn't testing the exact reliability of radiocarbon dating be really easy, though? Just take an event from a relatively recent past, like 1952 or something, where it's young enough that people can remember it happening and we have actual, solid evidence that's hard to bury and/or dispute, yet old enough to be suitable for carbon dating. Run some tests. If it works precisely, then we can say that yes, it appears to give accurate results, at least for recent events and give more proof to the phenomenon. If it is off by, say, 200-300 years or more, or gives some weird result that doesn't even make sense, then that calls the entire enterprise into question.

You can't even say that it's obviously not going to work for recent years to defend against it, at least based on my understanding of the Wikipedia page and its sources on radiocarbon dating.
You would have to be able to understand the accelerating rate of decay or something. So, if you show me results from 1952 and you have a Mickey Mantle baseball, you'd get a match. But, if decay is over 100s or 1000s or MILLIONS of years, how would your 1952 test be accurate?

Pardon my ignorance, I don't know very much about how radiocarbon dating works. I could be way off.
 

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