400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa

hajni

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400 year old maps do not really have deserts anywhere in the world. I’m inclined to think that african transformation is a humanoid caused cataclysm. Close examination of the surface via Google earth shows multiple circular craters. The shape somewhat eliminates an idea of an asteroid type damages.

The other part is where the mountains of fine sand came from. Scientific explanation is pretty funny if you look it up.
I' ve find these picture in an old thunderbolts forum article written by the user Shelgeyr (the whole material about the vortexes is very interesting, if you have the time to look at it:
The vortex.
An extraterrestrial sand scar?
and these about the origin of the sand: (may be, the whole thing happened not so long time ago...)

_Major_Spiral_Paths_Whole_World_04_lo_res.jpg100408africa.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

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Interesting how the second article refers to the Great Chicago Fire.

I think if it was a natural catastrophe which created the Sahara desert, there would be no reason to hide it from people. Same goes for all those Great Fires.

Vortexes could be an interesting tech we don’t know about.
 

whitewave

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Your observations, KD, and your speculations remind me of Charles Fort. His writing style was one of pure condescending sarcasm and humorous wit. Of course, you're not condescending in your approach at all but your ability to point out the patently ridiculous "official" explanations in a way that makes one feel rather foolish to have ever believed such nonsense is strikingly similar. I commend you, sir!
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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let me ask you, than what is the reason the true history of mankind is hided from people?
Hard to say for sure. This is one of the reasons this site was created for. There are three major questions of who/what - how - why. And I honestly have no clue, just guesses.

There are too many possibilities unfortunately. Zeroing in on a single one does not appear to be possible at the time.

The most general of answers I could give is that such knowledge (of what really happened and why) was preventing those who stand behind this "cover up" from achieving their goal. Figuring out what the goal was would bring us real close to solving this riddle.

I could spend the entire day answering this question. Just like I said before, appears that everything is tied in together, starting with our space programs and ending with Sahara desert. When I'm ready to tackle this broad topic, I will post my conceptual hypothesis.
 

whitewave

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Since the global elite are, by necessity of their secrecy, a smallish group (of unknown numbers), it seems to me that an agenda of global depopulation is required to keep the herd down to a manageable level. It's even the first "commandment" on the Georgia Guidestones. The evidence of neurotoxic fluoride in our water supply, genetically modified bacteria released into the wild (no putting THAT toothpaste back in the tube!), mandatory vaccinations, glyphosphate poisoning of our food supply, Fukashima bleeding radiation in the Pacific ocean for YEARS (how is that NOT a global problem?) etc. ad nauseum tends to suggest that the plan is well underway.

If the masses were to have visual reminders that our world was once a glorious garden of eden with multiple cultures, races of people living peacefully together enjoying the fruits of technological advancement that benefits all and to then see what's happening to reduce their numbers and herd them/us into control pens of conformity, the small group of elites would probably not be able to save themselves from the riotous populace even with their superior technology. Just a thought.
 

mythstifieD

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400 year old maps do not really have deserts anywhere in the world. I’m inclined to think that african transformation is a humanoid caused cataclysm. Close examination of the surface via Google earth shows multiple circular craters. The shape somewhat eliminates an idea of an asteroid type damages.

The other part is where the mountains of fine sand came from. Scientific explanation is pretty funny if you look it up.

And as far as archeological discoveries go. Sahara has multiple cities buried under these mountains of sand. A simple overlay of the older maps over current ones will show where thry are at. Do archeologists look for those cities? Clearly they are not. They do not need any star shaped fortifications dug out from underneath a “million year old” mountain of sand.
Wow! What a thought! I'm booking my flight and packing my shovel!

In seriousness, I almost wonder if we could reach out to some of the more open minded Egypt archaeologists and see if they'd be daring enough to possibly make one of the biggest discoveries of our lifetime? Simply go where one of these lost cities are and see what's under the sand. Heck, History channel loves doing these kinds of things.
 

whitewave

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I think such an archaeologist would get wacked before the first shovel hits the dirt.
You are quite right about that. There are modern stories about amazing discoveries that got shut down DURING discovery and of decent people having their reputations and lives ruined for daring to state the obvious with their discoveries. I've got a list of many of those around here somewhere.
 

Dirigible

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You are quite right about that. There are modern stories about amazing discoveries that got shut down DURING discovery and of decent people having their reputations and lives ruined for daring to state the obvious with their discoveries. I've got a list of many of those around here somewhere.
Post it, would love to see
 

whitewave

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108 degrees F today so everyone is sucking up the electric and my computer keeps shutting off when the breaker blows. Too aggravating to deal with that anymore today but I'll get to it. Here's one to whet your appetite:

In 1982, Robert F. Marx, the father of underwater archaeology, went to Brazil to see about some amphoras (Roman vases) found by a fisherman. He not only found more vases but the entire shipwreck from which they came. Being a big shot, Brazilian government knew he was there and what he was doing. When he excitedly declared that these were ancient Roman artifacts and wanted to leave to get funding for a full expedition and shipwreck retrieval the Brazilian government freaked out. Since the news of the find had already been published, the Italian ambassador to Brazil tried to lay claim to Brazils' territory saying that there was now proof that the Romans were there before the Brazilians. The Brazilians shut that site down, covering with 100 tons of silt and making a law that no one can ever do underwater reclamations again. There are over 100 shipwrecks around Brazil that are known but no one is allowed to retrieve anything from them.

I can kind of understand their point of view since Italy was being jerks about it but that's one of the milder stories.
 

tyler durden

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At first I just took for granted all the desserts.. it is what it is, but in more recent times, since I started questioning everything I've come to look at this subject in a different light.

First off, I don't think nature works this way. I don't think left to its own devices since the beginning of time nature would produce such inhospitable environments, and I don't mean just for humans. I've come to view nature as life. Life in all its lushness and vibrancy and diversity and so on..
A dessert is the exact opposite of this.. it's a bit on the death-end of the scale if you ask me.
Oh, and another thing about nature.. nature doesn't lie, ever. It just follows the laws of this world, to the T I might add.
So for a piece of land to become so barren something must have caused it. There must be a chain of causality.
So of course it must be human intervention of some sort.

On my journey I've actually stumbled across something which I consider to be very relevant to this discussion, but let me give you some context first.
I'm from Romania, Timisoara to be more precise, which is like the westernmost big city, something in the region of 300.000-400.000 people, depending on where you want to draw the (metropolitan )line. Timisoara is the municipality of the Timis county (Timis is also a small river), and is considered the capital of the historical region of Banat.
Now the interesting thing with this Banat is that you can leave Romania and enter Serbia, but you're still in Banat. So basically you have a former province that was split in more recent times, when the latest borders were drawn - so today we have the Romanian Banat and the Serbian Banat. (which is just one case of large communities of Romanian ethnics left outside of the 'motherland' after WWII)I
In the last couple of years (somewhat coinciding with my awakening to the truth of this world) I've made trips to some of our neighbouring countries: Hungary, Serbia and Bulgaria. While travelling by car through Serbia, just 30-40 km in, still in Banat I went through a national park -Deliblatska Peščara, not really knowing what it's all about, just figured there should be some interesting sights.

This place turned out to be very intriguing.. It's basically a 300 km² patch of sand with scarce vegetation. Pescara is translated in English as 'sands', and it is very simmilar to the Romanian 'pescar' which means 'fisher' (a pescui = to fish, peste = fish).

I just love the wiki description:
The sands are named after the village of Deliblato, in the municipality of Kovin. Its main masses are elliptical shaped hills with steppe grassland plains and steppe forests.
The Deliblato Sands is the largest sandy terrain in Europe, once part of a vast prehistoric desert, having originated from the withdrawal of the Pannonian Sea.

Deliblatska Peščara - Wikipedia

I would note a couple of key-terms for later reference: steppe grassland plains, steppe forests, prehistoric desert.
The thing is I never heard about this place and it's like 100 km from where I live, no one I know knew about it, haven't read about, haven't seen a documentary on it, nothing. The road that goes through the park is a bad joke, 1 lane forrest - type road with gaping holes and everything. There were times when we had to stop, get out of the car and check the soil to figure out the best way to go forward, on a 1 lane road I remind you. So basically we drove at about 5-10 km/h, slow enough to really get the chance to check out the scenery.
Deliblatska Peščara - Google Search

You know, nature has a way of reclaiming its own right.. All those abandoned cities filled with vegetation and so on. I think this is how a dessert begins to return to life given enough time. I regret not having a PhD to lend credence to any estimation I might make as to how many millins upon millions of years it takes for dust carried by the wind to set on the sand and start forming a superficial layer of soil in which vegetation can begin to grow. Nature always finds a way.

I know there are major differences in size, climate and so on between Sahara and these dunes in my backyard. But. It's obvious to me that sahara type desserts have to be a fairly recent thing. It would take volumes to go through my entire theory but the short of it is:

Sand in this type of quantity is somewhat unnatural. I think it's most likely some sort of pulverized rock, like literally blown to smithereens..
There's another interesting point here with sandy beaches vs. rocky beaches - as comfortable as they may be, there's something 'fishy' about those sandy shores. Pun intended. And of course, the Romanian shoreline to the Black Sea is sandy, unlike many others in the Mediterranean basin.
In my view these patches of scorched earth are what remains of former strongholds of the formerly great worldwide civilization ('the good guys', Tartaria if you will). Basically it's where it went down and the entire wrath of the empire('the bad guys' still in control today) was channeled into obliterating certain strategic points / areas / parts of continents that would render the rest of the empire helpless.

From a historical point of view, Romania is the continuation of Dacia. I won't presume there are too many experts on what really happened in this part of the world, but I'm telling you it's pivotal to the entire historical narrative. I'm not asking you to believe me, I'll probably expand on it in a new thread at some point. Even in conventional history Trajan's Dacian Wars are regarded as the battles of the Roman Empire that mobilized the biggest part of their army, with soldiers being relocated from as far as Iberia (Spain). I don't recall the exact number of legions, but it's something like 21/22 out of a total of like 40 legions spread throughout the entire empire.

The conclusion of the Dacian Wars marked a triumph for Rome and its armies. Trajan announced 123 days of celebrations throughout the Empire. Dacia's rich gold mines were secured and it is estimated that Dacia then contributed 700 million Denarii per annum to the Roman economy, providing finance for Rome's future campaigns and assisting with the rapid expansion of Roman towns throughout Europe.[6]:8 The remains of the mining activities are still visible, especially at Roșia Montană. One hundred thousand male slaves were sent back to Rome; and to discourage future revolts, legions XIII Gemina and V Macedonica were permanently posted in Dacia. The conquered half (southern) of Dacia was annexed, becoming a province while the northern part remained free but never formed a state.
That Dacia was considered a substantial threat can be seen by the fact that Trajan withdrew troops from other borders leaving them dangerously undermanned.
the Romans found Decebalus's treasure in the river of Sargesia/Sargetia - a fortune estimated by Carcopino at 165,500 kg of gold and 331,000 kg of silver.

Trajan's Dacian Wars - Wikipedia

And that's just skimming the surface of what historians choose to tell us. The whole geography of Romania is like a natural fort with the Carpathian mountains as the stronghold and the Danube as the 'moat' to the south. So it's easy to defend, especially if you know your way around it and make use of the most strategic points, which the Dacians did. The Romans had to bring their A-game to the table. Given the extent of technological capabilities in warfare not recorded by history, I find it highly likely that these desserty areas on the outskirts of Dacia/Romania are the aftermath of 'when and where' the 'empire' breached 'the resistance'.

Even with the 1000-1300 extra years I suspect this was earlier than most recorded wars. So the dust literally had time to settle.
steppe grassland plains, steppe forests - Siberia, anyone? All those craters, all that desolation, all that lack of population..

All in all it's a huge topic, I'd rather expand on what you guys are interested in, so feel free.

Oh, I almost forgot. I noticed on some if not all of the African maps prior to the 'new entry' of Sahara there's a land in the north-west corner of the continent called 'Barbaria'. Barbaria - Tartaria (you need to take into consideration the perspective, who is labelling these people?), for them the indigenous populations are the barbarians. Let me take it a bit further... Bulgaria - Vulgaria (vulgar latin is what is considered to be the language spoken by the population of the empire), Serbia - Servia (this goes into the slavs - the slaves). Notice the distinct bad-PR all these words have in the English language, they are tainted, they are meant as derrogatory terms. Hungary - Hungry, as in hungry for more(land), as in once part of an empire (Austro-Hungarian empire), as in still laying unfounded claims to land in all their neighbouring countries.
Dacia has interesting connotations in Romanian - d'acia means from around these parts, from here. It's short hand for 'de aici'(literally 'from here') in modern Romanian - 'aici' has many archaic and regional variants: aci, ici, aicia, icisa, etc.
You'd be amazed of how far they've run with this.. (the empire in naming things I mean)

+ funfact: The Tartaria tablets are considered by some(mostly outside the mainstream) archeologists and historians to be literally the oldest writing in the world, predating the Egyptians, predating the Summerians, predating any other culture. Some have even shown how the later cultures credited with the invention of writing base their symbols on these, how these have evolved differently in different parts of the world.
Tărtăria tablets - Wikipedia

I'm not even going to go into why this place was called Dacia/Getia/Scytia and many other variations before the Romans showed up and now it's called Romania. Funny, a sick sense of humour, but funny none the less.. the Roman Empire and Romania, it kind of makes you wonder..

I rest my case, but I'm open for questioning.
 

tyler durden

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Man you should make an article of this stuff. Any of it. There's so many points you made! The word play was particularly interesting and a clever observation.
Thanks, I appreciate it.

The thing is a few paragraphs in I'd get into things that are so preposterous, so over the top that most people wouldn't even consider what I'm saying. I tend to stray off the beaten path, mainstream version of things, and at some point anybody that hasn't really done the research get's turned away, it's just too much to take in.. Some call it cognitive dissonance.

And the entire discussion is so vast, and it only makes sense on a macro scale if you take into account all the little pieces of the puzzle that it's generally off-putting for most. (that type of 'too long, didn't read' mentality). And you can't really give someone the gist of it in 2 phrases, it doesn't work that way. I'm not trying to get people to believe what I'm saying, I just want to get people thinking and researching on their own.

Don't get me wrong, I'll write about it, it's what I set out to do a couple of years back, but I didn't have the capacity to imagine to scope of it all back then, it's been a hell of a ride. Part of the reasoning for joining this forum is that I feel it's a win-win situation. I get to share my thoughts with likeminded people, getting feedback and basically bouncing ideas around to get to the heart of the matter. In my mind I know this whole altered history is still just one piece of the puzzle, grant you an important one because it goes into identity, psychology and the likes, but still just one brick.
I've always had this obsession with contextualizing things and the problem with most historical researchers is that they are just historical researchers, not taking much of anything else into consideration. The way I see it the way you integrate whatever truth you learn in this field is the true art. How you allow it to mold your thoughts and bring you closer to the truth of what your true potential is and what the real nature of this world we live in is. My point is I've always thought the delivery(/the rhetoric) was crucial and given the complexity of the whole thing it's not really something you can rush into. Looking back I'm glad I didn't start writing the first 15 times I genuinely thought about it. Call me old-fashioned, but I think one should trully master a subject before attempting to present said subject to others.

Thanks again, and I appreciate the openness. It's a rare thing, it shouldn't be, but it is..
 

Magnetic

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Comets are not material bodies like the old "dirty snowballs" or the new and improved "rocky bollides" that NASA has been promoting of late and instead is a magnetic/electrical phenomena which has complex interactions with the earth's magnetic field. When Phaeton traverst northern Africa it may have laid down blasts of plasma and we do find scorched areas but mostly we find SAND and lots of it. The electrical discharges must have been huge and plentiful since those discharges transmuted Nitrogen(N2) fusing the bonded 2 Nitrogen molecule into one Silicon molecule which was immediately oxidized to form silica dioxide-sand. Silica has the atomic weight of 2 nitrogen atoms! How do I know this you ask? Well I was researching a scientist from Germany who came to the USA and figured out the mathematics to allow AC motors to be made without burning up through induction. I can't remember his name (it's Steinmetz) at the moment and my hard drive failed a few days ago....anyway he had another problem to solve which was figuring out how much current lightning had so he could devise a device to safely shunt the current away from the transformers. He built a gigantic capacitor 2 stories high to replicate lightning. Upon creating a lightning bolt reporters and other scientists noticed a sulfur smell and A FINE DUST in the air(the observers were oblivious to what the dust and sulfur smell signified...) I confirmed my hypothesis of transmutation of the atmosphere during extremely high energy events from comets and lightning. The oxygen molecule O2 has transmuted to sulfur and then oxidized forming sulfur dioxide and the nitrogen N2 was transmuted to silica and oxidized to form sand. I believe this is the mechanism that placed the sand over northern Africa and destroyed the civilization there.

In other discussions about dust and sand there was a wonder about where it came from. From my hypothesis we can see that strong electrical discharges above certain areas would produce sand and sulfur oxides. The sulfur compounds would be very injurious to health. Since 80% of the atmosphere is nitrogen then sand would be produced in great quanites where the electrical discharges were happening but a deadly amount of sulfur dioxides would be produced that would injurious to health of plants and animals. Volcanic sulfur may also be produced through electrical transmutation of oxygen.
 
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KorbenDallas

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In other discussions about dust and sand there was a wonder about where it came from. From my hypothesis we can see that strong electrical discharges above certain areas would produce sand and sulfur oxides.
I can see sand being produced by this, but can it produce mud?
 

Magnetic

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I'm looking into production of clay through transmutation of the atmosphere and water to produce mud. Clay has Al2O3 in it in large amounts and other oxides. My hunch is that this process would produce clay although it must be a more complicated chain of reactions than the direct production of silica dioxide and sulfur dioxide from nitrogen and oxygen. The New Madrid earthquake discharges produced lots of sand and sulfurous oxides that was documented by the survivors and also produced petrified parts of people and fulgurites(I found a video of a guy who owns the land where the discharge(s) struck and he has collected artifacts from the site). So a massive series of discharges instantly turned the unlucky people at ground zero there to stone. This shows the power of the electrical/magnetic transmutation theory I am developing.
 

whitewave

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Could you alert site member noblewish to this theory? We were talking about the giant statues possibly having once been people turned to stone and she's very knowledgeable on the subject (microbiologist). I'd really like to hear a conversation between you two on the subject.
 

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