32,000 Year-Old Plant Brought Back to Life

whitewave

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32,000 year-old plant brought back to life. "The oldest plant ever to be regenerated has been grown from 32,000-year-old seeds—beating the previous recordholder by some 30,000 years." Russian team found some seeds 124 feet below the permafrost, thawed them out, planted them and voilla! Ancient campion plant resurrected!

18521

prehistoric

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non prehistoric​

(Actually, I've seen silene plants that look exactly like the "prehistoric" ones but according to academia, this particular variety only grows in Siberia and Japan. Since it apparently hasn't been growing for 32,000 years, I'm not sure how they can know it only grows/grew in Siberia and Japan but so sayeth the sages). Actual scientists got their hands on the data and had this to say: "However, the plants in figures 2–4 in ref. 1 do not possess the diagnostic characters of S. stenophylla. The leaf morphology, inflorescence structure, floral morphology, indumentum, and seed characteristics instead all indicate that the plants belong to the Silene linnaeana Czerepanov (Lychnis sibirica L.) group. These taxa are only distantly related." (Dear Russia: when making up stories, accurate details are important)

There are several seeds that can lay dormant for years (50 years is the longest I've ever heard of until this discovery) which is why it's so hard to get rid of some of the weeds in your yard. One big problem with the whole thawing-it-out-and-bringing-it-back-to-life: our abysmal record in achieving anything like that in cryogenics research due to crystallization/lysing of the cells due to water expansion in the cells would kind of preclude that scenario. Even a flash-freezing would still be a freezing with its innate thawing problems. How to avoid lysing (exploding) plant cells (and presumably the seeds as well) which have been swelled by their water content?

The article doesn't explain how they overcame that little difficulty but I'm sure the cryogenics people would like to know. They do tell you that squirrels chewed on some of the seeds damaging them beyond redemption. (How do they know it was a squirrel? Did the squirrel leave a note? Did they find a squirrel with the seeds in its mouth? Do squirrels even eat silene seeds? They might-I honestly don't know). On the plus side of this patently ridiculous story, if it's true (the age of the recovered seeds, not the finding of them-although that may be entirely made up too), then it's big news for seed preservation for endangered species of plants and for our doomsday vault.

Kind of a hard experiment to repeat for verifiable results. First there'd have to be another find of 32,000 year old seeds in order to verify the results. I think the Russians are safe in that regard.

This find breaks Israel's oldest seed revived by 30,000 years. "Elaine Solowey, a botanist at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies in Israel resurrected the 2,000-year-old date palm that previously held the title of oldest regenerated seed. Her palm seed, though, had been buried in a dry, cool area, a far cry from the S. stenophylla seeds' permafrost environment. (So apparently, how they're stored doesn't make any difference? Wal-Mart lied to me! and I've been foolishly buying new seeds every year). Not only did her 2,000 year old seeds sprout after being found but they sat around in a drawer for 40 years before she decided to try planting one for chuckles and grins. Still grew. (I know you can't see me but I'm wiping the word "stupid" off what must be written on my forehead). Even she had a hard time believing it. "I assumed the food in the seed would be no good after all that time. How could it be?" said Solowey. She was soon proven wrong.

Silene does have some medicinal values but I'm not sure they apply to this particular (mis-identified version of Silene).

Well, now that you're all softened up on the gullibility scale......The French found some 200 MILLION year-old hemp seeds deep in the Antarctic permafrost and those little troopers also grew. "The obvious question on most minds: how potent is this strain of Cannabis? One researcher did sample the plant (for research purposes only, ya know) and measurements said one hit is the equivalent of smoking four ounces of a normal strain of cannabis (how would the researcher know what it's like to smoke 4 ounces of cannabis? Hahahaha. Kind of busted himself, didn't he?) . While it’s an important discovery, many are worried the ancient strain could get out of the lab and into the hands of marijuana growers. The lab said while the drug will leave the user catatonic for two to five days, there is absolutely no risk of overdose and the researchers promise they will do everything within their power to keep the plants secure." (They're probably smoking it up now to rid the world of this dangerous jurassic plant. Saved by the heroic French! Yay.) Now we know why Antarctica is a frozen wasteland-bunch of ancient stoners had one bowl too many and forgot to pay attention to the climate control regulator.

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It wouldn't be the first time people have made up an ancient seed brought back to fruitful story. 10,000 year-old Arctic Lupine found in 2005 in the frozen Yukon was found to be just a regular modern plant. "The oldest claim for longevity (> 10,000 years) cited in this book (published in 2005) is for arctic lupine (Lupinus arcticus) seeds frozen and buried in the Canadian Yukon. The author is skeptical of the claim, and, indeed, a recent scientific report confirms that the seeds were from modern times." Also in 1843 some guy claimed to have found and sprouted kamut wheat seeds found in the hand of an excavated mummy. The wheat sold for exorbitant prices and since the trick worked so well, the following year another guy unwrapping mummies found some wheat and pea seeds. Ancient wheat seemed to already be taken but he did manage to get some of the peas to grow. In 1850 some mummy raider found some roots which, when replanted, grew into dahlias. Maybe the Doomsday Vault should throw a few mummies in the freezer with their seeds.

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"Thanks to scores of scientific studies, we now have a pretty good idea of how long most seeds remain viable, that is, able to germinate. Under normal conditions (dry and cool), most seeds will remain viable for only a few years, and anything over 50 to 100 years is quite remarkable. (The reason, of course, is that some, if not most, of the seed is alive and respiring, and, thus, is using up its food supply, albeit very slowly.)"

It's been tried. "In 1933, a series of experiments were made on some wheat from Egyptian tombs. Every possible method of inducing germination was attempted, including an effort to use colored glass. All were in vain. The seeds merely crumbled to dust." (I wonder if they tried leaving it in a drawer for 40 years? That seems to work well).

These are the kinds of sarcastic discoveries I wish were true. I don't doubt the discoveries themselves happened; what I doubt is the age of the discoveries. It would really be great if I could just pop a few seeds from my heartiest plants into the freezer and let my great-grandkids thaw them out for growth in their gardens. I wouldn't have to worry about GMO seeds or re-buying fresh seeds every year. I would only need 1 pot plant instead of the legally allowed 6 plants. That'd really free up some extra space for the heirloom tomatoes.

From 2,000 years to 200 million years, seeds are apparently immortal. What I always ask myself when I hear yarns like this (commercials on tv included) is, "who benefits if I believe this?" TV commercials are easy to answer but in the case of lost-in-the-tundra-with-no-special-preparation-it lives! yarn, I can't figure out who is the beneficiary.
 
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KorbenDallas

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Russian team found some seeds 124 feet below the permafrost, thawed them out, planted them and voilla! Ancient campion plant resurrected!
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: A nice addition to our collection it is.
I can't figure out who is the beneficiary.
I think this is the maintenance stage. We have to know that our world is very old, and little informational injections like this one, in a very nonchalant way, "remind" us of just that - our World is very very old.
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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I think this is the maintenance stage. We have to know that our world is very old, and little informational injections like this one, in a very nonchalant way, "remind" us of just that - our World is very very old.
Probably, but is the fluoride really working that well? Surely even the most gullible who believe everything CNN and NASA says is gospel truth have to pause when they hear things like this. The dinosaur hoaxes seem to be working fairly well; they should stick with that.

I did find the Antarctic cannabis seeds to be interesting only because we have a Piri Reis map from the 1500's that shows an ice-free Antarctica which would mean the seeds would probably not be more than 500 years old at the most which is still incredible (incredulous) for maintaining viable seeds. Still more believable than 200 million years. It's simply not possible for anything to last 200 million years-not dinosaur bones, not bugs stuck in amber, and certainly not living seeds or living anything. All things degrade over time, even frozen things. Anyone who doubts it can have the fruitcake I got as a gift 3 years ago and stuck in my freezer. It's still there. I think it's well and truly dead now. Maybe if I stick it in a drawer for nearly half a century, heat it up with a little butter.......
 

Plissken

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If they really did find seeds that old, one would hope they would think twice about trying to germinate them. They might be unleashing something not so good for humans. Not that I believe it. I know @whitewave is a plant and flower lover like myself, I am sure she will confirm that seeds aren't always effective even after a couple of years much less eons. If you stored them well in an airtight, sterile enivornment, maybe, but in the conditions the seeds were found in -NO WAY!

I kept thinking of sci-fi while reading this awesome sarcastic post. Every time they tried to do this in sci-fi, the plant ended up containing pollens that killed or altered humans. I wish I could remember what cheesy movie I saw this on but I bet I watched it with the crew of MST-3000.


I somehow missed this sarcastic finds board when I was playing catch up. Doing so right now. Thanks for the heads up on the sarcastic posts KB!

Plissken 🐍
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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I kept thinking of sci-fi while reading this awesome sarcastic post. Every time they tried to do this in sci-fi, the plant ended up containing pollens that killed or altered humans. I wish I could remember what cheesy movie I saw this on but I bet I watched it with the crew of MST-3000.
Plissken 🐍
Maybe not the one you're thinking of but Invasion of the Body Snatchers had that theme. Valid consideration, btw. Don't need any pod people resurrecting with any supposed ancient seeds.
 

WarningGuy

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and the researchers promise they will do everything within their power to keep the plants secure."
So that must be the new strain of seed i seen on the net somewhere for sale. Its called Antarctic Avalanche and the seeds are not cheap. I now see why. Thanks researchers for not having any willpower to keep that one secure. I better be off now i have to do some online shopping.
 

milhaus

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Maybe not the one you're thinking of but Invasion of the Body Snatchers had that theme. Valid consideration, btw. Don't need any pod people resurrecting with any supposed ancient seeds.
Don't fall asleep!!!

The first movie that came to mind for me was The Day of the Triffids. @Plissken
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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Ice Maiden found buried with cannabis seeds. Supposedly 2,500 year old tattooed Siberian mummy with breast cancer buried like royalty. How they know she wasn't royalty is beyond me. I'm guessing she used the canna for her pain.

Again, we have seeds that survive 2,500 years. No mention of whether the seeds were planted so at least they're not trying to tell us the seeds were viable.
 

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