19th century: Underground City in Turkmenistan and the fake Caspian Sea History

KorbenDallas

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Some interesting things we can find in the older books. Has anyone ever heard of this huge underground city located in Turkestan (I assume it's today's Turkmenistan) sometime at the end of the 19th century? This could be a made up story, just like with anything else out there, but... who knows?

And at this link you can find some of our contemporary accounts suggesting that there could be some related things in the area:
  • During the construction of a bridge across the Amu Darya between the cities of Atamurat and Kerkichi in Turkmenistan, Ukrainian builders stumbled upon underground tunnels built about five centuries ago.
  • At the end of the 50s a local aksakal, pointing to an almost destroyed earthen structure, told us that the underground tunnel under the river, built by Tamerlan's soldiers, begins here. So he was right and the people of Kerki knew about it.
kd_separator.jpg

As far as I understand this town of Karki should have have been spelled Kerki. This is the only resembling name I could find next to the Amu Darya river. More on this Karki can be seen here.

I could be wrong about this Karki being Kerki, but I simply can't find no Karki on the maps.

kerki_11.jpg

1881 - 2019
The book excerpts clearly state that this underground city was supposed to be on the right side of the Amu Darya river. At the same time it says it was next to Kerki, and Kerki is located on the left side of the river. looking at the 1881 map we can see quite a few municipalities on the right side of Amu Darya. Somehow none of those were chosen to indicate the underground city.
  • A pure speculation on my part, but I think the underground city could have been located on the left side of the Amu Darya river. I mean the spot named Seid situated just below Kerki on the 1881 map. On our 2019 map you can see Zeid Reservoir in the same location. It was built in 1987, just before the collapse of the Soviet Union.
  • Wouldn't we flood, or destroy our famous Area 51 if the United States was to lose the control over Nevada?
  • We do have a precedent: Lost ancient palace appears in reservoir
  • I am not sure we can pinpoint the location of the underground city with the available info. At the same time, we can cause some collateral damage to the PTB Narrative.
The Caspian Sea
Caspian_Sea_from_orbit.jpg

Formation of the Caspian Sea (per the Narrative):
  • The Caspian Sea, like the Black Sea, is a remnant of the ancient Paratethys Sea. Its seafloor is, therefore, a standard oceanic basalt and not a continental granite body. It became landlocked about 5.5 million years ago due to tectonic uplift and a fall in sea level. During warm and dry climatic periods, the landlocked sea almost dried up, depositing evaporitic sediments like halite that were covered by wind-blown deposits and were sealed off as an evaporite sink when cool, wet climates refilled the basin. (Comparable evaporite beds underlie the Mediterranean.) Due to the current inflow of fresh water in the north, the Caspian Sea water is almost fresh in its northern portions, getting more brackish toward the south. It is most saline on the Iranian shore, where the catchment basin contributes little flow
BS above, and Truth Below
I do not know what millions of years our pseudo-scientists are talking about. It appears that Caspian Sea (in its current shape) was formed 370 years ago tops.


You can verify the transformation progression here, and here. The information we get from the older map suggests a very similar to everything else picture. Sometime in the 17th century the humongous Caspian Sea, aka Mare de Bachu, lost approximately 75% of its waters. The outline of the "ancient" shape can still be seen on the modern maps.
  • In the process an additional small Aral Sea was formed. It is losing its waters ever since the day it was formed in the 17th century. Scientists are screaming bloody murder over the ecological catastrophe in the area. Meanwhile, the process could be purely natural. On the bright side, they can build their own Salt Lake City now.
Aral_sea.jpg


Amu Darya River
In classical antiquity, the river was known as the Ōxus in Latin and Ôxos in Greek - a clear derivative of Vakhsh, the name of the largest tributary of the river.
  • Classical antiquity is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 6th century AD.
  • KD: The narrative needs to update this Classical Antiquity with the Renaissance, unless this Classical Antiquity took place 370 years ago.
May be I was too generous with the Renaissance time frame. Here is an excerpt from a book published in 1884.

oxus-river.jpg

kd_separator.jpg

Well, anyways... if you come across any info on this Kerki/Karki lost underground city, please share. It would be nice to find out how a mile and a half long city found in the 1890s gets lost with no trace.

P.S. They have some ridiculous ruins in the area. Check this Merv place out. Nice artificial stone it has down at the bottom, me thinks...

Merv.jpg
 

Banta

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Turkestan appears to describe an area larger than Turkmenistan. The wiki description sounds like how they try to describe Tartary/Tartaria:

Of Persian origin, the term "Turkestan" (ترکستان) has never referred to a single national state. Iranian geographers first used the word to describe the place of Turkic peoples.

"Turkestan" was used[by whom?] to describe any place where Turkic peoples lived
Love the "by whom" there. Just look up at the books in Korben's post, wiki!

578px-Turkestan.png

Map of Turkestan with modern state borders. The area covers a large number of countries including: Russia (parts of Siberia), Mongolia, parts of the Chinese autonomous province of Xinjiang, south Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and parts of Afghanistan.
 

HulkSmash

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What if in the 1892 and 1895 texts at the beginning, when they state "in the chain of rocky hills near the Bokharan city of Karki", they are referring to Karschi in the 1881 map and Qarshi in the 2019 map and not Kerki at all? It would make it on the 'right' side of the Amu Darya and put it much closer to hills. Another great bit of research KD, I am so intrigued by map comparisons. I think they say a lot. There is no way the really old maps that show most of Asia mapped with cities everywhere, is because a cartographer was making it all up and was just a bit of fun fiction on the future people. These are clearly showing great discrepancies with our Earth and history, that need more investigation. Thank you again for this forum!
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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You guys are right. It cannot be the Afghanistan one, for it is way to the left of the river. The phone map got me confused. May be that Seid place could be the one after all. Then again, there is plenty of room on the right side of the river.
  • Could this map help us out (or this one) in locating the possible candidate for the Underground City? Based on the Kerki/Karki location, it had to be one of the cities on the south east coast of the bigger old sea.
When you play with the former and current Caspian Sea elevations in the Google Earth, it appears that the area which lost all the water was pushed approximately 400-1000 feet up.

Additionally the 1574 map shows how many different cities and towns were in the vicinity, especially to the south of the Caspian Sea.

1574-map.jpg

What a terrible thing happened to all of them poor souls, in approximately 1650, if I were to guess. Today the area looks like this. All these cities got buried, or so it seems...

2019_map.jpg
 

VinniePazman

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What a terrible thing happened to all of them poor souls, in approximately 1650, if I were to guess. Today the area looks like this. All these cities got buried, or so it seems...
Comparing two maps - the one you showed -1574 map - and current one.

kaspisjskie.jpg

There's one theory I think it is time to bring it closer to you.

17th century deluge in Europe - should be okey to understand with automatic English translation

The guy is proving that big changes in Caspian and Black sea region was caused by flood coming from north.

So maybe missing towns were destroyed in consequences of this event
 

Aply1985

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Download from internet document name "Ist_geografija_sogda.pdf" and you will find real place where Kirki or Zamm or Karkuh is located.
it is not a secret Russian scientists now about this anciant region.

Photo below How it looked in 19 century

1519991_original.jpg

Location of Kerki former/anciant Zamm or Karkuh

"На участке Амударьи между средневековыми городами Замм (Керки) и Амул (Чарджоу)" - "On the stretch of the Amu Darya between the medieval cities of Zamm (Kerky) and Amul (Chardzhou)"

"Этот памятник можно сопоставить с рабатом Хуваран -
, поскольку он находился в непосредственной близости от переправы Шир, выше по течению Амударьи. И, наконец, последняя переправа перед Займом (Керки), находившаяся около рабата ал-Муджавирун, по-видимому, была расположена напротив Бурдалыка, где она функционировала еще в начале XX в. [477, с. 728]. В местности чуть выше Бурдалыка на левом берегу Амударьи у кишлака Пальварт Халачского района был найден клад медных монет кушанского и сасанидского времени [246, с. 259], что может косвенно свидетельствовать о древности переправы Бурдалыка.
Расстояние от средневекового Амула до Займа" - This monument can be compared with the discount Huvaran -
since it was in the immediate vicinity of the Shir crossing, upstream of the Amu Darya. And, finally, the last crossing before Zaym (Kerki), located near Rabat al-Mujavirun, was apparently located opposite Burdalyk, where it functioned at the beginning of the 20th century. [477, p. 728]. In the area just above Burdalyk on the left bank of the Amu Darya, near the kishlak Palvart, Khalachsky district, a treasure of copper coins of Kushan and Sasanian times was found [246, p. 259], which may indirectly testify to the antiquity of the Burdalyk crossing.
Distance from the medieval Amul to the Loan

while i was looking for Kerki i found some new info for me, Before Russians there were kingdom of Greco-Bactrian was, along with the Indo-Greek Kingdom, the easternmost part of the Hellenistic world, covering Bactria and Sogdiana in Central Asia from 250 to 125 BC. It was centered on the north of present-day Afghanistan. The expansion of the Greco-Bactrians into present-day eastern Afghanistan and Pakistan from 180 BC established the Indo-Greek Kingdom, which was to last until around AD 10.
Greco-Bactrian Kingdom - Wikipedia
KD look on the dates when it was 250 to 125 BC!
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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The guy is proving that big changes in Caspian and Black sea region was caused by flood coming from north.
Interesting theory, but I have my doubts that this is indeed what happened. May be it did, but such a flood would have destroyed everything in its path, and I’m not sure we can see that on the maps.

On the other hand, Google Earth demonstrates a drastic elevation increase to the East of the current Caspian Sea. To me it signifies that the water was pushed out. And that’s a lot of water we are talking about.
KD look on the dates when it was 250 to 125 BC
Yup, that’s what they do with dates. There are two images in the link you provided.
Those “possible” greek warriors, and greek soldiers wearing Scythian helmets. It’s just comical. One of those images is below.
  • Probable statuette of a Greek soldier, wearing a version of the Greek Phrygian helmet, from a 3rd-century BC burial site.
Bronze_Warrior_Statue_without_shade.jpg
 

Aply1985

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Those “possible” greek warriors, and greek soldiers wearing Scythian helmets. It’s just comical.
i saw it.
for me more interesting that picture
Cybele
AiKhanoumPlateSharp.jpg

Cybele - Wikipedia


Statue of Liberty?
Screenshot_20190802_144132.jpg

Look on the lion size
Screenshot_20190802_145419.jpg
Photo below How it looked in 19 century
That wall looks like poligonal
Screenshot_20190802_150431.jpginca-wall-saqsaywaman-peru-south-america-example-polygonal-masonry-famous-angles-stone-ancient...jpg
Those “possible” greek warriors, and greek soldiers wearing Scythian helmets. It’s just comical.
One more evidance that world we know, some time ago was UNITED. It was one GLOBAL civilisation.
 
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BStankman

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Looks like eroded mud brick.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e6/Cyark_merv_3.jpg

1566119995443.png


Very reminiscent of the Ziggurat of Dur-Kurigalzu in Iraq.
Oxford Mesopotamian Photographic Archive

ziggurat-dur-kurigalzu-16.jpg

Also similar to the Casa Grande Pueblo ruins. Although Phoenix seems to be a smaller scale.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Ruins_near_the_Great_Casa_Grande,_Arizona,_by_Continent_Stereoscopic_Company_2.png


bde5ccd3a452cf13a3a58eb4d69d8b6a.jpg 79381ec44f31fc7a21b1eec7fbca863e--monument-valley-ancient-ruins.jpg

If this map is accurate.

.jpg

Then this Star fort is newish, or was underwater for a spell.

1566121806129.png

1566121998464.png



This kind of relates to the Magnificent white cities of the Tartars.
Here we have the emblem of Turkmenistan and coat of Arms of the Mangystau Region of Kazakhstan.

800px-Emblem_of_Turkmenistan.svg.png Маңғыстау_логотибі.jpg


It is pretty clear to me now why the American Indians were classified as Tartars.​
 

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