19th century Engineering Magazines, Heavy Machinery and Equipment

KorbenDallas

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Just like with any information, its comprehension depends on which angle you approach it from. If you are ready to accept that semi-naked Ancient Egyptians built the Pyramids using chisels and sleds, it will prevent you from considering other possibilities. Any attempts at visualization of the process, and the fact that we would not be able to repeat the feat today (using the same technique) are irrelevant when all the facts contradicting the official narrative are being ignored. Blind faith, it probably is.

Well, that said I wanted to present this thread on the 19th century Engineering magazines which are somewhat hard to find, though there are tons of them digitized by Google. There might be a lot of these magazines out there, but hundreds of them are still missing. Below we have an image of the 1868 Engineering Magazine. It is volume 19. As you can see, with the "old series" that makes it volume 88. Two volumes were being published every year. This in turn means that we have 35 years and 70 volumes preceding this one. God knows what we had prior to approximately 1833, but there had to be something. That "something" we might never get a chance to see.

Keep in mind that Sir Henry Bessemer, developed the first process for manufacturing steel inexpensively (1856), leading to the development of the Bessemer converter. This Bessemer process invention should be a thread of its own, but prior to it steel was available in very small quantities. That leaves us with pig and cast iron.

The above magazine is only one brand name of the engineering magazines published in the mid-nineteenth century. The other one, of the top of my head, would be "Engineering". I have seen multiple magazines pertaining to railroads, trains, construction etc.

1850-1860's, what do we know about that time from the traditional narrative point of view? It was the time when multiple wars were co-existing with the so-called Industrial Revolution. Here are some of the World Population details:
  • 1750 - 700 million
  • 1800 - 1 billion
  • 1850 - 1.2 billion
  • 1900 - 1.6 billion
  • 2018 - 7.7 billion
We are interested in 1850's in this case. (For our population numbers shenanigans please visit this thread here.) According to our traditional narrative, only Europe, North America were, for the most part, capable of inventing things. That leaves us with the below for 1850:
  • 206 million people - Europe
  • 28 million - North America
With a high degree of certainty, it sounds like "screw the rest of the World". Only Europe, and the East coast of the North American continent were inventing things. Simultaneously, Europe was fighting everywhere they had a pleasure of visiting. Naturally, the question of what education would allow for such a high concentration of "innovative vision" comes to mind. At least to mine it does.

235 millions of people, half of which had to be women who did not even have a Right to vote, some had to be children, and some had to be too old to invent anything. The remainder had to be fighting wars, supplying wars while simultaneously inventing things.Those same very things depicted in the engineering magazines I'm talking about. Here are just some of the links to those magazines:
Some of the related SH threads are:
The equipment published in the above magazines could put a serious dent into the plantation slavery narrative. I have hard time imagining that an army of people involved in manual labor could be cheaper, and more effective when compared to the machinery presented in the magazines.

Those people did not mess around, and to build this 1870 cannon

1870 cannon.jpg

they had this "simple" machine ready since at least 1868. Obviously since much earlier, but this is the date of the pub.

boring_machine_barrel.jpg

And they really needed the Dovetails in 1868. To simplify the process they simply invented the below machine.

dovetaling_machine.jpg


Manganese Battery with Alkaline Salts
Alkaline_battery.jpg

telegraph.jpg

1868 - The Mechanic's Magazine - page 203
There is much more here and here.

KD: I accept that by now my judgment of what normal is (for 1850s) could be skewed. Please look through some of the above linked magazines, and if you see a piece of machinery which surprises you, please share it. It's just the things presented there, are outside of my former understanding of that time frame. Additionally, if you find any other related engineering magazines from the same time frame (and 1830s would be super great), please post a link.
 

Prana

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I find this swastika imagery most intriguing(from gun drilling barrel), as if these ancient symbols are the components of blueprints needed to make anything one desires:

Swastika Machine Part.PNGSwastika Machine Part Flower Superimposed.png

As well as this Vaubans Fortification from volume 6 compared with the castle of Good Hope in South Africa:

Volume 6 - Star.jpgGood Hope.jpg
 
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Searching

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I find this swastika imagery most intriguing(from gun drilling barrel), as if these ancient symbols are the components of blueprints needed to make anything one desires:


As well as this Vaubans Fortification from volume 6 compared with the castle of Good Hope in South Africa:

1544719122552.png

We take what is in the sky and repurpose it down here. Stars, constellations. As above, so below.

Welcome, Prana.
 

Searching

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I did engineering graphics and design for 3 years in high school and we used to draw a lot of machine components. I cant even fathom how these parts were drawn without the aid of computers if they supposedly had none back then.
Yeah, if the parts can't be drawn 2-dimensionally without the aid of computers, how could they be produced 3-dimensionally without being machined?

Maybe we were different then. Maybe we used much more of our brains and didn't need to externally delegate these tasks to machines. Maybe it wasn't us who came up with these designs.

The more I unlearn, the less I know. I am to the point now of knowing nothing.
 

whitewave

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The print is small and hard (for old eyes) to read but I found it curious that in the 1867 Engineering, vol. 4 link there was an article complaining about the judges lack of judgment in awarding inferior designs on display at the Paris Exhibition with gold medals, even ones that broke during their demonstration but ignoring or awarding lesser medals to superior designs that were great improvements over the current technology. Of course, any time prizes are awarded there will be complainers but the article's author gives specific examples that make his point. The gold medals were awarded to American, British, and French designs even though some German and African designs showed superiority.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Pretty sure the entire "previous" world was involved in inventing things, and it probably have taken longer then the official duration of the Industrial Revolution.

At the same time the official history does not really give any credit to Africa, or Asia etc, for the industrial jump. Figured by displaying the inconsistency of the official narrative, as well as ridiculing it to a certain degree, we could get a few people to start looking into things.
 

whitewave

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I wonder how the Industrial Revolution ever got off the ground in the first place. If you read articles of the time there is a great wailing and bemoaning over the lack of quality education. If everyone was such uneducated and overworked farm hands, working from dawn to dusk, how did they have the wherewithal and time to invent anything?
 

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