1916: History is bunk, says Henry Ford

KorbenDallas

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Any opinion on this saying by Henry Ford? There are quite a few narrative compliant interpretations out there, but what did he really mean?

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In 1916 a clearly agitated Henry Ford famously proclaimed that “history is more or less bunk.” Thirteen years later, however, he opened the outdoor history museum Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. It was written history's focus on politicians and military heroes that was bunk, he explained.

- Henry Ford - Quote: "History Is Bunk"
 

anotherlayer

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Any opinion on this saying by Henry Ford? There are quite a few narrative compliant interpretations out there, but what did he really mean?


In 1916 a clearly agitated Henry Ford famously proclaimed that “history is more or less bunk.” Thirteen years later, however, he opened the outdoor history museum Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. It was written history's focus on politicians and military heroes that was bunk, he explained.
He'd be banned from YouTube with that kinda talk these days. He then goes on to say that there is really no need to care about the past and our history, you have to live for today. He was a goof.
 

milhaus

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Found something interesting in an article:

Nearly a century ago, Henry Ford sued the Chicago Tribune for calling him an “ignorant idealist,” and his eight days on the witness stand would forever dispel the notion that the great man was anything else.

In one memorable exchange, Stevenson asked, “Do you know anything about the Revolution, Mr. Ford?”

“Yes, sir,” Ford answered.


“What revolution did you have in mind, Mr. Ford?”

“In 1812,” Ford replied to murmurs of astonishment in the crowded courtroom.


After the trial, the media pronounced its own unequivocal verdict on Ford’s performance. “Mr. Ford has been submitted to a severe examination of his intellectual qualities,” wrote the New York Times. “He has not received a pass.” “The man is a joke,” blasted the New York Post.

But the 11-man jury and the American public took a rather different view of the proceedings. After 10 hours of deliberation, the jury found in favor of Ford but awarded only six cents in damages (which the Tribune never paid). And despite incurring the scorn of the intelligentsia, Ford’s bumbling testimony seemed to endear him even more to the millions of Americans for whom he was the quintessential man-of-the-people.
Seems like a classic psyop to me. Any common person that knew the real history or didn't agree with the official narrative were now lumped together with Ford.
 

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