1916: History is bunk, says Henry Ford

KorbenDallas

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Any opinion on this saying by Henry Ford? There are quite a few narrative compliant interpretations out there, but what did he really mean?

1770E49D-1346-4D71-AC4F-31BAA3345C02.jpeg

In 1916 a clearly agitated Henry Ford famously proclaimed that “history is more or less bunk.” Thirteen years later, however, he opened the outdoor history museum Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. It was written history's focus on politicians and military heroes that was bunk, he explained.

- Henry Ford - Quote: "History Is Bunk"
 

anotherlayer

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Any opinion on this saying by Henry Ford? There are quite a few narrative compliant interpretations out there, but what did he really mean?


In 1916 a clearly agitated Henry Ford famously proclaimed that “history is more or less bunk.” Thirteen years later, however, he opened the outdoor history museum Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. It was written history's focus on politicians and military heroes that was bunk, he explained.
He'd be banned from YouTube with that kinda talk these days. He then goes on to say that there is really no need to care about the past and our history, you have to live for today. He was a goof.
 

milhaus

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Found something interesting in an article:

Nearly a century ago, Henry Ford sued the Chicago Tribune for calling him an “ignorant idealist,” and his eight days on the witness stand would forever dispel the notion that the great man was anything else.

In one memorable exchange, Stevenson asked, “Do you know anything about the Revolution, Mr. Ford?”

“Yes, sir,” Ford answered.


“What revolution did you have in mind, Mr. Ford?”

“In 1812,” Ford replied to murmurs of astonishment in the crowded courtroom.


After the trial, the media pronounced its own unequivocal verdict on Ford’s performance. “Mr. Ford has been submitted to a severe examination of his intellectual qualities,” wrote the New York Times. “He has not received a pass.” “The man is a joke,” blasted the New York Post.

But the 11-man jury and the American public took a rather different view of the proceedings. After 10 hours of deliberation, the jury found in favor of Ford but awarded only six cents in damages (which the Tribune never paid). And despite incurring the scorn of the intelligentsia, Ford’s bumbling testimony seemed to endear him even more to the millions of Americans for whom he was the quintessential man-of-the-people.
Seems like a classic psyop to me. Any common person that knew the real history or didn't agree with the official narrative were now lumped together with Ford.
 

JWW427

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Henry Ford had a lot of faults, antisemitism most prominently. He was a real jerk to his son Edsel.
Ford only wanted to paint his cars black, so he was ahead of the modern trend.

He did proclaim however, that he had had countless lifetimes as a past life human being.
He said he had once been a soldier in the Civil War and then in another life worked on the Union Pacific railroad as an engineer. He was a mystic and believed in Atlantis and other Prediluvian high civilizations. He liked Edward Cayce, and knew the truth of our shadowy, false reality world. He publicly said his may incarnations were the source of his genius, and that religion was BUNK, too. Ford knew that our beloved BS history was written by the PTB fat cat winners: Kings, politicians, and generals.
His tapestry below contains the all seeing eye and pyramids. The tree of life as well. Obelisk and Sphinx.
Oh yeah, this guy was ON it.


Excerpts:

"Earlier this year I introduced readers to a small collection of artifacts unofficially known as Henry Ford Tributes. As I mentioned earlier, a few of these objects have some pretty amazing backstories. The wall hanging, shown above, is one such example. One may not think that Henry Ford and the subject of reincarnation could appear together in the same sentence but the fact is Henry Ford was an advocate of transmigration, stating in many interviews that he became a believer at the age of 26. He had earlier been given a copy of Orlando J. Smith’s book A Short View of Great Questions, originally published in 1899. The theories expressed therein regarding reincarnation and the tenets of a religion the author termed Eternalism seemed to answer some of the life questions that had begun to occupy the automaker’s thoughts. It also curiously coincides with the work ethic of Henry Ford as well as his definition of greatness."

In an interview that appeared in the San Francisco Examiner on 26 August 1928, he explained his belief:


"I adopted the theory of Reincarnation when I was twenty six. Religion offered nothing to the point. Even work could not give me complete satisfaction. Work is futile if we cannot utilise [sic] the experience we collect in one life in the next. When I discovered Reincarnation it was as if I had found a universal plan I realised [sic] that there was a chance to work out my ideas. Time was no longer limited. I was no longer a slave to the hands of the clock. Genius is experience. Some seem to think that it is a gift or talent, but it is the fruit of long experience in many lives. Some are older souls than others, and so they know more. The discovery of Reincarnation put my mind at ease. If you preserve a record of this conversation, write it so that it puts men’s minds at ease. I would like to communicate to others the calmness that the long view of life gives to us."
"Under separate cover I am sending you one of my Egyptian Wall Pieces – which I send to Friends – to give them ‘something’ worthwhile to think about rather than motion pictures, novel reading, and Card playing !"
(This could be smartphone, dumb movies, iPod, and video games today)

In my novel, Little Anton, Ford chats with Dr. Ferdinand Porsche in private about where "genius" comes from. Porsche, another genius, nealry spits out his beer.
I truly believe this conversation took place because my research tells that Ford rarely if ever praised other engineers, but he made an exception for likable Ferdinand. They often went camping in Ford's early RV truck. Ford loved nature, and knew the importance of getting outdoors for one's mental fitness. He said harsh cities were full of sad people with diminished souls.

Look at those wild eyes: Ford definitely knew some of the truth about our genuine history and reality, and was a Freemason I believe.
And by the way, General Patton also publicly said the same thing about genius and reincarnation. Pretty brave thing in those days. These two misfit mystics knew one another and got along well. They both knew Theosophist Rudolph Steiner to boot.

Yes, flawed, but both Ford and Patton were not crystal-gripping, quinoa-gulping Silicon Valley hippies aligning their chakras while emailing more tech jackdolts on their Google Glasses!
Both ultra-conservatives, both geniuses, both hard-asses, both mystics, these two men nonetheless changed history.
Porsche changed history too with the VW, but thats another story in my funny, saucy book.

As an aside, I could find only one or two women geniuses listed publicly in history. I wonder why? Were their names erased? I say yes.
JWW


Ford wall hanging.jpeg


Ford.jpeg
 
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Red Bird

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Henry Ford had a lot of faults, antisemitism most prominently. He was a real jerk to his son Edsel.
Ford only wanted to paint his cars black, so he was ahead of the modern trend.

He did proclaim however, that he had had countless lifetimes as a past life human being.
He said he had once been a soldier in the Civil War and then in another life worked on the Union Pacific railroad as an engineer. He was a mystic and believed in Atlantis and other Prediluvian high civilizations. He liked Edward Cayce, and knew the truth of our shadowy, false reality world. He publicly said his may incarnations were the source of his genius, and that religion was BUNK, too. Ford knew that our beloved BS history was written by the PTB fat cat winners: Kings, politicians, and generals.
His tapestry below contains the all seeing eye and pyramids. The tree of life as well. Obelisk and Sphinx.
Oh yeah, this guy was ON it.


Excerpts:

"Earlier this year I introduced readers to a small collection of artifacts unofficially known as Henry Ford Tributes. As I mentioned earlier, a few of these objects have some pretty amazing backstories. The wall hanging, shown above, is one such example. One may not think that Henry Ford and the subject of reincarnation could appear together in the same sentence but the fact is Henry Ford was an advocate of transmigration, stating in many interviews that he became a believer at the age of 26. He had earlier been given a copy of Orlando J. Smith’s book A Short View of Great Questions, originally published in 1899. The theories expressed therein regarding reincarnation and the tenets of a religion the author termed Eternalism seemed to answer some of the life questions that had begun to occupy the automaker’s thoughts. It also curiously coincides with the work ethic of Henry Ford as well as his definition of greatness."

In an interview that appeared in the San Francisco Examiner on 26 August 1928, he explained his belief:






(This could be smartphone, dumb movies, iPod, and video games today)

In my novel, Little Anton, Ford chats with Dr. Ferdinand Porsche in private about where "genius" comes from. Porsche, another genius, nealry spits out his beer.
I truly believe this conversation took place because my research tells that Ford rarely if ever praised other engineers, but he made an exception for likable Ferdinand. They often went camping in Ford's early RV truck. Ford loved nature, and knew the importance of getting outdoors for one's mental fitness. He said harsh cities were full of sad people with diminished souls.

Look at those wild eyes: Ford definitely knew some of the truth about our genuine history and reality, and was a Freemason I believe.
And by the way, General Patton also publicly said the same thing about genius and reincarnation. Pretty brave thing in those days. These two misfit mystics knew one another and got along well. They both knew Theosophist Rudolph Steiner to boot.

Yes, flawed, but both Ford and Patton were not crystal-gripping, quinoa-gulping Silicon Valley hippies aligning their chakras while emailing more tech jackdolts on their Google Glasses!
Both ultra-conservatives, both geniuses, both hard-asses, both mystics, these two men nonetheless changed history.
Porsche changed history too with the VW, but thats another story in my funny, saucy book.

As an aside, I could find only one or two women geniuses listed publicly in history. I wonder why? Were their names erased? I say yes.
JWW


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View attachment 28772
Sounds like your dreams of builder heros haven't died yet.
To me he seemed to regret agreeing to his slavery. Could he have done it on his own? He'll never know.
http://mileswmathis.com/ford.pdf
Which story do you believe?
 
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JWW427

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Both stories. But those guys were history-changers, not builder heroes.
Interesting stuff, the bloodline thing.
Like all big shot geniuses, he had handcuff financial backing.
Porsche had Hitler and Himmler on his ass 24-7.
I agree, the Model T was brilliant, but lasted far too long. Ford was arrogant.
Edsel did the multicolor paint option Model A and the rest is history...I think.
I wonder how Mr. Mathis figures all that lineage info out?
JWW
 

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