1915 Autopeds - first electric and gasoline motor scooters

KorbenDallas

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#1
Just wanted to throw this out there. I keep on getting this notion, that some things do not belong to their time. On one hand the information is available if you know what to look for. On the other hand we do not run into stuff like this every day. I find it particularly weird, when a technological achievement gets itself a five line Wikipedia page, like it is really insignificant. And when we talk about an electric scooter made in 1915, I would definitely want to get more info on the 1915 electrical battery, for example.

"The Autoped was an early motor scooter manufactured by the Autoped Company of Long Island City, New York from 1915 to 1921.

The driver stood on a platform with 10-inch tires and operated the machine using only the handlebars and steering column, pushing them forward to engage the clutch, using a lever on the handlebar to control the throttle, and pulling the handlebars and column back to disengage the clutch and apply the brake. After riding, the steering column would be folded onto the platform to store the scooter more easily. The engine was an air-cooled, 4-stroke, 155 cc engine over the front wheel. The bike came with a headlamp and tail lamp, a Klaxon horn, and a toolbox. Developed during wartime and gasoline rationing, it was quite efficient, but was not widely distributed. An electric version was also available with a motor on the front wheel.

This is normal, right? 1917 Autoped Ad
autopeding_1917_ad.jpg

Feeling bamboozled yet? They were classy back then...

A patent for the Autoped as a "self-propelled vehicle" was applied for in July 1913 and granted in July 1916. An early description of the Autoped described it as having a hollow steering column that acted as the fuel tank. However, the production version had a fuel tank above the front mudguard." - Nothing else in Wiki

1915-1919 Autoped

autoped_3.jpg autoped_4.jpg autoped_1.jpg autoped ad 1915.jpg autoped ad.jpg Autoped-Girl.jpg
history-of-electric-scooters.jpg Autoped-ad.jpg autoped smithsonian.jpg autoped smithsonian 2.jpg Autoped-ad_1.jpg Autoped-ad_2.jpg Autoped-ad_3.jpg

Mail delivery in 1915 - 1920

autoped 1917.jpg autoped_5.jpg autoped_7.jpg

Meet 100 miles per gallon prior to 1920

100_mile_per_galon_scooter.png

source
Wiki says about these scooters > "Developed during wartime and gasoline rationing, it was quite efficient, but was not widely distributed." Yet this 1919 article excerpt from The Badminton Magazine of Sports and Pastimes, Volume 52 states this.

scooter_lives.png

Fun fact: Records show that the first patent for an electric personal transport device, an electric motorcycle by chance, was filed in late 1895 by inventor Ogden Bolten Jr. of Ohio, United States. Ogden’s design is crude by today’s standards, but it was revolutionary at the time of its conception.

electrical_bycycle_Patent_1.png
electrical_bycycle_Patent_3.png electrical_bycycle_Patent_2.png

And 1897

electrical_bycycle_Patent_4.png

* * * * *
I did not look tremendously hard for the images of the electric scooter. I tried real quick but failed. So if you find one or two, please share. I really would like to see the battery, and may be some documentation for it.

Anyways, it was just a little piece of info pertaining to something developed 100 years ago. Coincidentally this something (electric scooter) had to wait for almost 100 years to be adopted.

Some 100 years later....

autoped_x.jpg
Quite a few things we re-discover a century after they initially introduced... or we think they were.

Non-popular 1916 Motor Scooter

autoped_advertisement_1.jpg autoped_advertisement_2.jpg autoped_advertisement_3.jpg autoped_advertisement_4.jpg autoped_advertisement_5.jpg autoped_advertisement_6.jpg
autoped_advertisement_7.jpg autoped_advertisement_8.jpg autoped_advertisement_9.jpg autoped_advertisement_10.jpg
Where is a picture of the electric one?
 

whitewave

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#2
The original Segways! Apparently the EverReady battery company got involved to make an electric option.

A utility box, mounted toward the front of the machine, now contains the batteries that were added to the electrical system; an ignition coil is mounted just in front of the utility box.

autoped_1.jpg

I don't see anything about them being solely electric.
 

CyborgNinja

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#4
There is also that point made by new earth youtube video about the streets. What were the streets in those photos paved with. It's like some supremely flat concrete. Why are we using asphalt nowadays? Why aren't we using what they have in those photos.

Oh and the idea that these inventions took 100 years to get to us is very frustrating.
 

ISeenItFirst

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#5
There is also that point made by new earth youtube video about the streets. What were the streets in those photos paved with. It's like some supremely flat concrete. Why are we using asphalt nowadays? Why aren't we using what they have in those photos.

Oh and the idea that these inventions took 100 years to get to us is very frustrating.
It may be a resolution issue with the pictures, but we do still use concrete for roads, very often. Concrete doesn't hold up to the abuse, which is why It gets layered with asphalt. Most of the time when you see a concrete road, it is not finished yet, sometimes they stay that way for years or longer.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#6
Roads and city streets is a big issue in itself when looking at those early photos. A good example is in the Buffalo topic. They are monumental. How did they move those amounts of concrete?

As far as the topic at hand. We have too many things “invented” 100 years ago, but being introduced as novelty today. That’s bizarre.
 

ISeenItFirst

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#7
Roads and city streets is a big issue in itself when looking at those early photos. A good example is in the Buffalo topic. They are monumental. How did they move those amounts of concrete?

As far as the topic at hand. We have too many things “invented” 100 years ago, but being introduced as novelty today. That’s bizarre.
Depends, if the was enough local aggregate, (probably sand and gravel) and in New England there is plenty, they may have been able to source it local. I believe cement can be mined local in NE as well, but I may be wrong on that.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#8
The amounts we are talking about, even if the source was just around the corner, are ridiculously huge. What did they use for transport?

53F14B0B-5248-4F6E-BF2E-F92693D52178.jpeg
And that manhole cover in the middle of the street suggests exactly what?
 

ISeenItFirst

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#9
Could be a lot of things. But it does suggest that is the final planned road surface. If you look at those other construction pics one was building the road in a city. Unlike our 1850s new york pneumatic system, the way it is done is to dig a trench and put the road on top. Whether it be utilities or subway or sewer or whatever. I haven't looked too close at that pic yet, but there were some anomalies there as well, was going to ask where the pic came from, to find out what city and see what they were supposedly constructing under the road, because it was not apparent from that shot.
 

humanoidlord

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#10
this is just plain ridiculous, where the hell do you put a battery in that thing, even worse, did you see those motorized heels and the mini dog sized scooters at the illustration in the top of this article?
just WTF
 

ISeenItFirst

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#11
this is just plain ridiculous, where the hell do you put a battery in that thing, even worse, did you see those motorized heels and the mini dog sized scooters at the illustration in the top of this article?
just WTF
If your talking about the scooters, it wouldn't need a battery. It would have a small dynamo to provide the spark and you would likely push start it. Some later models showed lights and a battery with a battery box it seems.

Didn't notice the heels or the dog scooter.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#12
I think he is talking about an electric version of this scooter with a motor on the front wheel.

Still find it interesting that I cannot find a single image of the electric version.
 

whitewave

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#13
autoped_1.jpg

I'm guessing the battery is that box in front of the motor. Looks like a metal ice cooler or ammo box. A utility box, mounted toward the front of the machine, now contains the batteries that were added to the electrical system; an ignition coil is mounted just in front of the utility box.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#14
That's an air-cooled, 4-stroke, 155 cc engine over the front wheel on the image above.

The only electric appearing version I could find is a drawing. Go figure.

Autoped-Girl.jpg
 

The Kraken

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#18
NINEBOT-NO9.jpg

This is the Segway ninebot scooter

with the in handle battery it will propel a man at 25kph for 25 km.
with the added battery pack it will propel a man at 32kph for 40 km.

we sell like 2 of these a week.
 

humanoidlord

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#19
If your talking about the scooters, it wouldn't need a battery. It would have a small dynamo to provide the spark and you would likely push start it. Some later models showed lights and a battery with a battery box it seems.

Didn't notice the heels or the dog scooter.
look at the big illustration at the top of the article
also thanks for explaining to me
 

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