1906/1914 World’s Largest Resort Hotel “Fireproof” Traymore Atlantic City, NJ

HiStoryBoost

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The Traymore Hotel was a massive beachfront Hotel built in 1906 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Wiki says it was not completed until 1930, but Wiki also has postcards from 1914 showing the completed structure. Grain of salt please.)

FA261D00-A74C-47A7-8B10-FBD410314534.jpeg

Known as “The Skyscraper By The Sea”.

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Built by Will Price (See his other works) The Traymore Hotel was the largest in Atlantic City by far, and was considered the “Largest Resort Hotel” in the entire world. It was also considered to be “fireproof” as shown in this ad from the early 1900’s.

B2ED021D-370A-4E16-9AA1-CD7461BC14E1.jpeg

Oddly, the Hotel Traymore was added the the NRHP on December 13, 1971 only to removed less than 3 weeks later on January 1, 1972 and subsequently demolished later that year. The Traymore was demolished 4 years before gambling would be legalized in Atlantic City.

At the time the Traymore Hotel held the world record for largest controlled demolition at nearly 6.5 million cubic ft (180,000 m3)

31D7CFE3-6A3D-44DD-8842-B94F28ED7859.jpeg

Besides the overall magnitude of the building for the time, and location, I also found another interesting fact: “The Traymore featured four faucets in every bathtub: hot and cold city water, hot and cold ocean water. There was a fifth faucet in the sink for ice water.” Pretty classy for the early 1900’s, no?

D198F38A-4B13-49C0-BBC9-320CFD16F039.jpeg

The Traymore was taken over by the U.S. Military in World War II. The Government apparently leased a whopping 47 buildings in Atlantic City during World War II to create a massive Military “Boardwalk” base. The Traymore was transformed into the “England General Hospital” up until June 1946, when it was released back to it’s original owners.


6984AE13-6FEC-46DC-889F-299A0242D4CA.jpeg

So... Even the world’s biggest resort hotel, fireproof and all (with five different faucets!), pivotal, at least in a small part, during WW2, can not survive the sands of time! Interesting to me to say the least.

The demolishing video is online as well as shown in the 1980 film “Atlantic City”.

Does anything seem off about this? Either way thought it was interesting enough to share with you all. Second post, go easy on me.
 

KorbenDallas

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OK, this is confusing.How many years did it take them to build this structure? From Wiki:
  • Built during the autumn and winter of 1914–15, White contracted with Price and McLanahan to replace the existing wooden-frame Traymore with a massive concrete structure that would rival the Marlborough-Blenheim.
  • Price's Traymore was built directly behind the 1906 tower, and was designed to take advantage of its ocean views: hotel wings jutted out further from the central tower toward Pacific Avenue, thus affording more guests ocean views. The new Traymore opened in time for the 1915 season, and was a success. Built with tan brick and capped by yellow-tiled domes, the Traymore instantly became the city's architectural showpiece when it opened in June 1915.
Am I reading it right? The concrete one was completed in two years only, 1914-1915?

P.S. Funny how those postcards almost always have US flags on them, but the actual photographs.... not so much.
 

KorbenDallas

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Well, they are either able to fool us even with 1915 time frame, or they had some infrastructure we do not know about.

Can we build this hotel in under one year today?
 

KorbenDallas

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Some related images and a demolition video at the bottom.

ac_hotels_traymore3_560.jpg

traymore_interior.jpg

traymore_interior_2.jpg

The video says that it was the largest controlled demolition. At least up to 2010 it was, based on the date of the video upload.


Trying to find some construction photographs. Where are they?
 

lostwithtime

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The Traymore Hotel was a massive beachfront Hotel built in 1906 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Wiki says it was not completed until 1930, but Wiki also has postcards from 1914 showing the completed structure. Grain of salt please.)


Known as “The Skyscraper By The Sea”.


Built by Will Price (See his other works) The Traymore Hotel was the largest in Atlantic City by far, and was considered the “Largest Resort Hotel” in the entire world. It was also considered to be “fireproof” as shown in this ad from the early 1900’s.


Oddly, the Hotel Traymore was added the the NRHP on December 13, 1971 only to removed less than 3 weeks later on January 1, 1972 and subsequently demolished later that year. The Traymore was demolished 4 years before gambling would be legalized in Atlantic City.

At the time the Traymore Hotel held the world record for largest controlled demolition at nearly 6.5 million cubic ft (180,000 m3)


Besides the overall magnitude of the building for the time, and location, I also found another interesting fact: “The Traymore featured four faucets in every bathtub: hot and cold city water, hot and cold ocean water. There was a fifth faucet in the sink for ice water.” Pretty classy for the early 1900’s, no?


The Traymore was taken over by the U.S. Military in World War II. The Government apparently leased a whopping 47 buildings in Atlantic City during World War II to create a massive Military “Boardwalk” base. The Traymore was transformed into the “England General Hospital” up until June 1946, when it was released back to it’s original owners.



So... Even the world’s biggest resort hotel, fireproof and all (with five different faucets!), pivotal, at least in a small part, during WW2, can not survive the sands of time! Interesting to me to say the least.

The demolishing video is online as well as shown in the 1980 film “Atlantic City”.

Does anything seem off about this? Either way thought it was interesting enough to share with you all. Second post, go easy on me.
Thank you for this post - now I will spend hours reading the history of Will Price (started at the magical age of 17 and it appears without formal training), and researching his buildings. This grandiose architecture gets my blood pumping and this is awesome.

I read that this hotel was demolished due to failed concrete? Politics??

Extremely versatile clients.

PA Armory was his.
1570410077680.jpeg
 

Banta

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Fireproof. Like they're daring people to try and burn it down.

Buildings like this, supposedly built in the early 20th century, throw me for a loop.
 

KorbenDallas

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Ok, how is it possible not to have any construction photographs for this monster of a building built in 1915.

May be @jd755 could give it a try?
 

Aply1985

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Traymore Hotel - Wikipedia
Hotel Traymore - Atlantic City
The Hotel Traymore of Atlantic City, New Jersey began as a boarding house in 1879. It was rebuilt more than once and expanded. At its peak it could accommodate as many as 1500 guests. The Traymore featured four faucets in every bathtub: hot and cold city water, hot and cold ocean water. There was a fifth faucet in the sink for ice water.

Hotel Traymore, Atlantic City, c. 1920 | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia
Here it is said that The Hotel Traymore was a large resort complex in Atlantic City, New Jersey, renovated and expanded in 1914–15 by the Philadelphia architect William L. Price and his partner M. Hawley McLanahan.

Search results for Traymore
Photos from 1900-....
Screenshot_20191009_163836_com.android.chrome.jpg
Screenshot_20191009_164035_com.android.chrome.jpg

Please remember scooters i marked near Traymore hotel. A litle bit out from main topic but still important
Screenshot_20191009_164313_com.android.chrome.jpg
Screenshot_20191009_164257.jpg

What power moves this scooters
I like how they nemed it "wheeled chairs on boardwalk"
Screenshot_20191009_164654.jpgScreenshot_20191009_164641_com.android.chrome.jpg

And Yes there is NO photo how it was built



It was 2 huge structures before
Screenshot_20191009_170716_com.android.chrome.jpg

Now
2470019872_864f01115f.jpg
 
Last edited:

maco144

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It's not just the Traymore that was exceedinglyEarly AC hotels impressive, AC was host to many such buildings. I am more particular to the unique look of the Blenheim.

blenheim_hotel.jpg

See more here Early Hotels - From Atlanic City's Nostalgic Past

Also I believe Jon Levi once did an Atlantic City video. What was peculiar to me was it looked almost like all the islands those NJ towns are of NJ is built upon look artificial. They sure were busy in that area in the past!
 

CurvedBullet

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The Traymore Hotel was a massive beachfront Hotel built in 1906 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Wiki says it was not completed until 1930, but Wiki also has postcards from 1914 showing the completed structure. Grain of salt please.)


Known as “The Skyscraper By The Sea”.


Built by Will Price (See his other works) The Traymore Hotel was the largest in Atlantic City by far, and was considered the “Largest Resort Hotel” in the entire world. It was also considered to be “fireproof” as shown in this ad from the early 1900’s.


Oddly, the Hotel Traymore was added the the NRHP on December 13, 1971 only to removed less than 3 weeks later on January 1, 1972 and subsequently demolished later that year. The Traymore was demolished 4 years before gambling would be legalized in Atlantic City.

At the time the Traymore Hotel held the world record for largest controlled demolition at nearly 6.5 million cubic ft (180,000 m3)


Besides the overall magnitude of the building for the time, and location, I also found another interesting fact: “The Traymore featured four faucets in every bathtub: hot and cold city water, hot and cold ocean water. There was a fifth faucet in the sink for ice water.” Pretty classy for the early 1900’s, no?


The Traymore was taken over by the U.S. Military in World War II. The Government apparently leased a whopping 47 buildings in Atlantic City during World War II to create a massive Military “Boardwalk” base. The Traymore was transformed into the “England General Hospital” up until June 1946, when it was released back to it’s original owners.



So... Even the world’s biggest resort hotel, fireproof and all (with five different faucets!), pivotal, at least in a small part, during WW2, can not survive the sands of time! Interesting to me to say the least.

The demolishing video is online as well as shown in the 1980 film “Atlantic City”.

Does anything seem off about this? Either way thought it was interesting enough to share with you all. Second post, go easy on me.
There's a clue to the building's use/construction provenance in the fact that the hotel room sinks allowed for hot and cold SEA water but I haven't sorted it out yet. 'Cuz who/what would need sea water on tap? Visiting mermaids & mermen? Was it a thing at that time to soak in sea water for health reasons? Hmmm.
Post automatically merged:

Those 'scooters' are pushed by people.
From pinterest so no link.
There is something off about this pic as if pieced together.
 

Samson4prez

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The Traymore Hotel was a massive beachfront Hotel built in 1906 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. (Wiki says it was not completed until 1930, but Wiki also has postcards from 1914 showing the completed structure. Grain of salt please.)


Known as “The Skyscraper By The Sea”.


Built by Will Price (See his other works) The Traymore Hotel was the largest in Atlantic City by far, and was considered the “Largest Resort Hotel” in the entire world. It was also considered to be “fireproof” as shown in this ad from the early 1900’s.


Oddly, the Hotel Traymore was added the the NRHP on December 13, 1971 only to removed less than 3 weeks later on January 1, 1972 and subsequently demolished later that year. The Traymore was demolished 4 years before gambling would be legalized in Atlantic City.

At the time the Traymore Hotel held the world record for largest controlled demolition at nearly 6.5 million cubic ft (180,000 m3)


Besides the overall magnitude of the building for the time, and location, I also found another interesting fact: “The Traymore featured four faucets in every bathtub: hot and cold city water, hot and cold ocean water. There was a fifth faucet in the sink for ice water.” Pretty classy for the early 1900’s, no?


The Traymore was taken over by the U.S. Military in World War II. The Government apparently leased a whopping 47 buildings in Atlantic City during World War II to create a massive Military “Boardwalk” base. The Traymore was transformed into the “England General Hospital” up until June 1946, when it was released back to it’s original owners.



So... Even the world’s biggest resort hotel, fireproof and all (with five different faucets!), pivotal, at least in a small part, during WW2, can not survive the sands of time! Interesting to me to say the least.

The demolishing video is online as well as shown in the 1980 film “Atlantic City”.

Does anything seem off about this? Either way thought it was interesting enough to share with you all. Second post, go easy on me.
Holy Shit all this time I spent in Atlantic City and didn't know there was a Boardwalk Base!
 

Starmonkey

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It's not just the Traymore that was exceedinglyEarly AC hotels impressive, AC was host to many such buildings. I am more particular to the unique look of the Blenheim.


See more here Early Hotels - From Atlanic City's Nostalgic Past

Also I believe Jon Levi once did an Atlantic City video. What was peculiar to me was it looked almost like all the islands those NJ towns are of NJ is built upon look artificial. They sure were busy in that area in the past!
That Marlborough-Blenheim building is INCREDIBLE. Reminds me of the Saltair in SLC a bit. But BIGGER. And more STONE.
 
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