1904: the destruction of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in Saint Louis

Tonep

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The thing is, it is possible to be wrong. We can be wrong, somebody else can be wrong. This is a very tricky topic we are dealing with.

What truly matters is the type of evidence. Some evidence is solid, and some is questionable. We have no clue about the volume of the retroactively produced maps. Those exist in great numbers.

For example Egyptian Pyramids supposed to exist for thousands of years. But upon closer examination of the maps we learn, that the Pyramids somehow escaped mapping up to the point when Napoleon went to Egypt. That, for a second, took place 1798–1801. Does it mean that Great Pyramids were built at the end of the 18th century? I don't know.

There is only one real old map where 3 Pyramids are present, that I know of. Which coincidentally makes me think that that specific map was doctored.
wasn't the existence of the pyramids recorded in history at some point in time? They may not be on the maps but people talked about thim at least. It just sounds too crazy for the pyramids to just spring up like that.
 

AdamIDSW

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That is the 64 million dollar question.
My family on both sides can trace itself back to 1700ish then stops.
It feels like every one in the world sat down and agreed not to ever talk about something ever again. Then filled in the gaps with identical people. Napoleon 1-3 comes to mind.

I need 20 years and several old estates libarys.
Yes it is all unnerving. One thing I don't understand is....why did they even bother with all these world fairs? WHy not just demolish what they wanted to erase, not draw attention to the cities, and pretend what was left, was all being newly built.
Another thing i noticed about Buffalo. It doesn't appear the familiar Star Fort appearance around, exists. I thought all of the tartary places like this, that SF shape would get cut out, and surrounded by water. SO its interesting its not there in Buffalo.
Those 4 quadriga structures are magnificent, and is tragic they got demolished. Like so much else.
 

anotherlayer

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Another thing i noticed about Buffalo. It doesn't appear the familiar Star Fort appearance around, exists. I thought all of the tartary places like this, that SF shape would get cut out, and surrounded by water. SO its interesting its not there in Buffalo.
The Buffalo Expo of 1901 was built by our hands, my ancestors, real people, on farmland. There is no previous Tartary influence to be found. However, the city of Buffalo tore down a handful while we are busy being AT the Expo ;)

Buffalo's tartary stock is still in downtown, we have so much left and if you squint hard enough you can see the past on any given corner (well except North Division and South Division).
 

Effie

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I've visited the St. Louis Art Museum and Bird Cage several times. While interesting they are not awe inspiring.

It's interesting to compare the grandeur of the "temporary" palace:

17305

With the existing building setting behind:

17306

The current art museum is impressive only in comparison to a Best Buy. Was it the real new construction, intended to stay after the possibly preexisting buildings were razed to the ground?

Still, it's worth visiting for their fantastic collection of art, armor, and weapons. They have things like energy weapons and weird armor that doesn't fit our anatomy. On my last visit, it stood out to me how the older paintings and sculptures were more skillful and then around the time of proposed resets they began to look like something an amateur (or even a child) might to do. But that's another topic.
 

KorbenDallas

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Great find. It's little things like that which add to the totality of circumstances allowing for questioning of the official narrative. I think you are the first one to catch something like that.

Pretty sure it will be conveniently explained with the date of the actual Louisiana Purchase.
 

KorbenDallas

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OMG guess what else that firm designed. Tada!
Everything is nicely tied in together, yet we still cannot figure it out.

Those, whoever did all these things were out of their mind in what they were displaying, yet even 20 years later horses were still pulling tram cars.
  • The 1904 World's Fair, St. Louis, Missouri: the US Government building: natural history exhibit featuring a blue whale skeleton and life-sized whale model
 

anotherlayer

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I'm not sure about that. May be we should revisit that that thread.
Oh, you can be sure of it ;) I have asked a few times in that thread, what is left that you are still undecided about? No one built an all-inclusive Atlantis 2 miles outside of a city that had the second largest concentration of millionaires per capita in the country at the time.

I have shown the pictures of construction, I have proven the farmland and I have shown the deconstruction and the newspaper clippings and my own personal connection to my residence and the 1901 expo.

What are we still up in the air about, that 1901 wasn't 118 years ago?
 

KorbenDallas

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I placed a link to 1901 expo for a reason. Let’s discuss 1901 in 1902 thread please.
 

dreamtime

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Oh, you can be sure of it ;) I have asked a few times in that thread, what is left that you are still undecided about? No one built an all-inclusive Atlantis 2 miles outside of a city that had the second largest concentration of millionaires per capita in the country at the time.

I have shown the pictures of construction, I have proven the farmland and I have shown the deconstruction and the newspaper clippings and my own personal connection to my residence and the 1901 expo.

What are we still up in the air about, that 1901 wasn't 118 years ago?
I appreciate your scepticism but since you know the topics of this forum I wonder why you stress it so much that not only you but everyone on this forum can be sure of something that is so complex and unknown. As long as doubt remains, it is valuable to continue questioning things.

If there was a cover up, someone would have put up superficial evidence for you to find. A 2 year long renovation can easily be molded into a new construction by our friendly newspapers. More complex things get hidden right under the public eyes, without any dissenting voice being heard.

One question I ask is not why there should have been an Atlantis surrounded by mud, but why there should have been a mud wasteland around an Atlantis.
 

Bald Eagle

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This girl claims to have traced every American President's ancestors back to Plantagenet in 1215.


Just wondering if this ties in to the whole "sudden cut-off" of maps, records, etc. and what could be behind the coverup of history.
(wasn't quite sure where to post this)

These buildings are Mammoth - and intricate. They had to withstand construction, use, weather, ... There's no way they could have been made out of fiber reinforced plaster. Heck, even today's crappy concrete buildings are crumbling apart.
I've seen interior walls of lath, horse hair and plaster bow out and peel off the lath just from a bit of water damage.
I work in a warehouse made of concrete and steel - and it's beat to hell, with a leaking roof that needs a $2 million replacement.

Plaster buildings wouldn't have survived a WEEK of intensive use during a crowded expo!

This whole expo pattern is VERY bizarre.
Seems very similar to the New Zealand Lord of the Rings / Hobbiton movie set....
 
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Tyrion

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But when you go to school they teach you that America was just a wasteland with bunch of different native tribes.

Was America the capital of Ancient Atlantis?
 

freezetime26

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The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory by the United States from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs for a total of sixty-eight million francs.

The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River (plus New Orleans); and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

View attachment 1925
Why was this land Frances' to sell in the first place?

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904

A century later the proud people of St Louis see fit to hold a spectacular celebration to commemorate 100 years since their inception. In the intervening years St Louis had gone from a small traders stop strategically positioned along a bend in the Mississippi River to a bustling cosmopolitan metropolis.

January 10, 1899 - Louisiana Purchase Convention convention of 90 delegates from states & territories of Louisiana Purchase met for purpose of considering commemoration of purchase. Delegates decided that nothing short of an international exposition would suit and decided that St. Louis, largest and most accessible city in area, would be the proper location. Missouri Historical Society also became involved in the effort.

With a stroke of their ink quills, the Delegates set in motion a course of event that over the next 5 years would see the construction of the greatest Exposition America had ever seen to date. A one George Edward Kessler was chosen as the architect.


Le Architect.

View attachment 1952
George Edward Kessler (July 16, 1862 – March 20, 1923)
was an American pioneer city planner and landscape architect.

Wikipedia says:
"Over the course of his forty-one year career, George E. Kessler completed over 200 projects and prepared plans for 26 communities, 26 park and boulevard systems, 49 parks, 46 estates and residences, and 26 schools. His projects can be found in 23 states, 100 cities, in places as far flung as Shanghai, New York, and Mexico City.

A popular myth says that Frederick Law Olmsted, who had died the year before the Fair, designed the park and fair grounds. There are several reasons for this confusion. First, Kessler in his twenties had worked briefly for Olmsted as a Central Park gardener. Second, Olmsted was involved with Forest Park in Queens, New York. Third, Olmsted had planned the renovations in 1897 to the Missouri Botanical Garden several blocks to the southeast of the park. Finally, Olmsted's sons advised Washington University on integrating the campus with the park across the street."

Some confusion over who was in fact responsible for the initial concept. Nothing suspicious but let us read on...

"...In 1901 the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Corporation selected prominent St. Louis architect Isaac S. Taylor as the Chairman of the Architectural Commission and Director of Works for the fair, supervising the overall design and construction. Taylor quickly appointed Emmanuel Louis Masqueray to be his Chief of Design. In the position for three years, Masqueray designed the following Fair buildings: Palace of Agriculture, the Cascades and Colonnades, Palace of Forestry, Fish, and Game, Palace of Horticulture and Palace of Transportation, all of which were widely emulated in civic projects across the United States as part of the City Beautiful movement. "

View attachment 1953
"Museum of Science and Industry, in Jackson Park, Hyde Park, Chicago IL, USA 2008"
Courtesy of Emmanuel Louis Masqueray -apparently.

Curious to find that an entire generation of grecco-roman buildings popping up around this time period. Sure multiples of the same building could have been built at this time or just as possible they already existed.

The temporary city.

U-S-History.COM has this to say about the construction of the Louisiana purchase Exposition:

"Nearly all the structures built during the fair were intended to be temporary. They were therefore constructed of staff, a mixture of plaster of Paris and hemp fibers. Following the fair, many of the structures were razed. Some of the buildings were spared, and they exist today."

OK hemp sacks and plaster, bear this in mind as this is idea of burlap sacks and plaster crops up again and again when investigating these expos which we'll cover in later articles. Now back to Kessler...
Kessler says, now this is important:

"Planning", wrote Kessler, "should be comprehensive. Even though a grand urban design could only be realized in bits and pieces, and over a long period of years, still we should always know where we are going. Each bit and piece should be understandable by reference to the great plan of which it is a part."

This was a man who built for longevity. He made no move with out firstly considering the future. "Future proofing" as they say nowadays. Are we supposed to believe that he developed an entire city out of hemp sacks and plaster? I'm no expert on building but how would that even be possible. Sure the internal frames could be wood and so on but look at the smooth finish on these walls...

View attachment 1954
Look closely. those are people standing up on that building.
That's either some very strong hemp sack or some very brave people.


Build it and they will come.

October 1901 - Ground plan with original buildings approved. Four principal executive divisions were organized - Director of Exhibits, Exploitation, Works, and Concessions & Admissions. Twelve main exhibit palaces recommended for erection:

  • Education 277,945 sq. ft.
  • Art, Four Sections (Main, E, W, S)198,448
  • Liberal Arts 393,760
  • Varied Industries 447,900
  • Manufactures 588,000
  • Machinery 412,800
  • Electricity 290,200
  • Transportation 684,254
  • Agriculture 800,000
  • Horticulture 240,000
  • Forestry and Fish and Game 180,000
  • Mines and Metallurgy 395,592
View attachment 1927
Wow looks like a whole lotta' fun.

  • Construction started: December 20, 1901
  • Construction finished: No Information.
  • Total construction time: No Information.
  • Opening: Initially July 1, 1902. Postponed until April 30, 1904
  • Closure: December 1, 1904
  • Total Expo operation time: 185 days (closed Sundays)
  • Visitors: 19,694,855
  • Ticket Cost 1904\(2018): US$0.50\(US$13.45)
  • Cost of the project in 1904\(2018): US$15,000,000\(US$403,503,095.26)
  • Profits 1904\(2018): US$6,402,308\($172,223,406.32)
  • No. Buildings constructed: over 1,500 buildings
  • Site of venue: Forest park, St Louis, 200-acre (4.9 km2)
  • Demolished: No information
  • Remaining buildings: (Palace of Fine arts - Currently St Louis Art Museum, Brookings Hall Administration building - Currently administrative offices for Washington University, “Flight Cage”(Exotic bird aviary).
View attachment 1940
Palace of Fine arts

View attachment 1947
Front entrance to Palace of fine arts.
Twice as large as the Columbian expo of Chicago held 10 years earlier and 10 times larger than the one held in Buffalo the Louisiana purchase expo covers an enormous 1,270 acres (510 hectares).

View attachment 1936
Louisiana purchase exposition, Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 1904.

View attachment 1949
Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 2018.
"As many people were curious about this up and coming city, many reporters and photographers attended the World Fair to document and understand the city. What they found was nothing like anyone else could have imagined. Still as a relatively new city, the streets were buzzing with activity, with many of its citizens constantly on the "go" and the streets "crowded with activity". One observer remarked that, at this time, St. Louis had more energy in its streets than any other Northern Street did." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

View attachment 1951
"Electric light, then a recent innovation, was used extensively for illumination and decoration." www.u-s-history.com
Remember this was all temporary. Hemp and plaster folks.


View attachment 1929

The exhibition is grand in scale and had a lengthy preparation, with an initial $5 million committed by the city of St. Louis through the sale of city bonds was authorized by the Missouri state legislature in April 1899.

An additional $5 million was generated through private donations by interested citizens and businesses from around Missouri, a fundraising target reached in January 1901.


The final installment of $5 million of the exposition's $15 million capitalization came in the form of earmarked funds that were part of a congressional appropriations bill passed at the end of May 1900.

The fundraising mission was aided by the active support of President of the United States William McKinley, which was won by organizers in a February 1899 White House visit.

There were 253 exhibit buildings and structures built by the Exposition, 13 constructed by Washington University, 34 national buildings, 45 State, Territorial and Municipal buildings, 92 Philippine buildings and other structures, 74 other buildings, and 448 Concession buildings.

The fair's 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) site, designed by George Kessler, was located at the present-day grounds of Forest Park and on the campus of Washington University, and was the largest fair (in area) to date. There were over 1,500 buildings, connected by some 75 miles (121 km) of roads and walkways. It was said to be impossible to give even a hurried glance at everything in less than a week. The Palace of Agriculture alone covered some 20 acres (81,000 m2).

This is the end, beautiful friend.

The Louisiana purchase exposition may truly have been the most breath taking exposition ever held. Between the Baroque grecco-roman super structures and the share number of activities available on any given day its hard to imagine something like this even being possible in today's world. There is no way all these buildings would have been cost effective with such a short season of a measly 185 days, with a total cost of US$15,000,000 and a net profit of only US$6,402,308. The Expo made a loss of US$8,597,692. That's the modern day equivalent of US$231,279,688.94 as of 2018 . I cant help but feel there are important things we aren't being told about the Exposition phenomenon of the late 1800's/early 1900's.

View attachment 1955
Gutted Missouri state pavilion. Which was destroyed by fire 19 Nov.
Two weeks before the fair closed.

There is little information to go one but soon after its closure the fair fell into disrepair and over the next few years all the structures were demolished allegedly due to their temporary nature. However there are a few remaining examples and we know from the Palace of fine arts that not all the structures were false. This building is clearly stone and we can see this today. But I could have told you that from looking at the period photos. Are we supposed to believe that these other clearly stone buildings were all made from paper mache and potato bags?



Yup. It's stone.
Then.
View attachment 1935View attachment 1941
You can only read so much from a photograph
but does this look temporary to you?

Now.
View attachment 1957View attachment 1956
Even If it was all just temporary surely that was better than this,
why not just build it all again but this time
not out of bean bags and bubble gum?

Was there a large scale conspiracy conducted by unknown persons to masquerade previously established cities and townships of an earlier culture as merely temporary show ground attractions? Was this facade then used to justify the demolition of these cities and the gradual erasing of its population and their achievements from our history books?

Seriously, who the hell builds an entire city, gets in debt and even destroys it!. Ironically that they say that those buildings where made out of plaster/weren't designed to prevail, but nowadays most houses are made out of wood and other cheap materials for profit, others build using steel so that they last a little longer, but there is a general tendency of making not only cheap buildings but cheap products aswell.
 

anotherlayer

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I appreciate your scepticism but since you know the topics of this forum I wonder why you stress it so much that not only you but everyone on this forum can be sure of something that is so complex and unknown. As long as doubt remains, it is valuable to continue questioning things.

If there was a cover up, someone would have put up superficial evidence for you to find. A 2 year long renovation can easily be molded into a new construction by our friendly newspapers. More complex things get hidden right under the public eyes, without any dissenting voice being heard.

One question I ask is not why there should have been an Atlantis surrounded by mud, but why there should have been a mud wasteland around an Atlantis.
Word up. I was just curious what KD was still unsure about (about the Buffalo Expo).
 

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