1904: the destruction of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in Saint Louis

The Kraken

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don't know what happened?

They where clearly building huge neo Roman palace complexes out of plaster and horse hair at a cost of millions of dollars to demolish it a few months later taking no photos of the construction destroying all plans and not making a return on investments but leaving a few random buildings standing that wasn't plaster and horse hair constructed so it is still around now "100" years later.

Simple
 
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in cahoots

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I know pretty much exclusively what I have been learning from you guys, but the Why seems fairly clear to me. This is about power -- not just political power, mind you. But I mean energy.

The entire system of not only economy, but life itself, probably the Universe, comes down to the cumulative distribution of energy. If there were any purpose for the existence of life on Earth, it would appear to be to transduce latent atmospheric energy -- solar, EM, tidal, gravitational, geothermal -- as efficiently as possible into... whatever we like, apparently. It appears our species has chosen to convert the infinite energy of the planet and stars into such testaments to ingenuity as paved roads, killing machines, stupid movies, and toxic, synthetic food.

The combustion engine was a brilliant discovery for about 50 years. Now, compared to what's available, it is one of the most grossly inefficient ways to produce energy, between extraction and combustion both. It seems to be *just good enough* to expand the population and turn up the heat. If we had the next level up of energy availability, we would be a lot less dependent on Big Daddy Oil and the governments that work for him.

Again, this is all pure speculation, but what we're basically looking at is free energy. If your house produced its own electricity... I mean, why go to work? What is the use in money, when people's houses can light of their lives or keep them warm indefinitely, free of cost?

This comes down to energy. I can't think of anything else huge enough to be worth covering up.
 

KorbenDallas

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Or may be they totally revamped the slavery concept, and we are those slaves thinking that we are free.

I could picture this concept with an Elysium like land, unknown to us, the slaves.

Urbano_Monte_Monti_1857_world_map.jpg Eliseum_planet.jpg
Thinking about it, we work all our lives, the entire world is border line broke. Where did all the produced go?

There just might be a few slave owners on the outer rim of this jail-planet.
 

The Kraken

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I like that one Korben.
I used to have a theory that never went away really. The earth used to be like it is now but better. And after a great war every thing was lost. So the winners wanting a prize but having destroyed it in winning decided to rebuild. Catch being they needed the losers to rebuild for them. So our entire civilization has been controlled to allow redevelopment and now we have reached that point they are directing us towards self annihilation. Then they get the prize untarnished. All it has taken is time.
 

humanoidlord

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Or may be they totally revamped the slavery concept, and we are those slaves thinking that we are free.

I could picture this concept with an Elysium like land, unknown to us, the slaves.

Thinking about it, we work all our lives, the entire world is border line broke. Where did all the produced go?

There just might be a few slave owners on the outer rim of this jail-planet.
slavery never got extinct, it just became politically correct, now its everyone, not just not-whites
 

pushamaku

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There just might be a few slave owners on the outer rim of this jail-planet.
Charles Fort came to this conclusion in 1919 in his book, "The Book of the Damned".

2018-05-11 14_45_21-The Book of the Damned [EPUB] - E-book viewer.png

Here's the link to the book if anyone is interested:

The Book of the Damned by Charles Fort

From his "The Man Who Invented the Supernatural" book:

Witchcraft always has a hard time, until it becomes established and changes its name. We hear much of the conflict between science and religion, but our conflict is with both of these.

Science and religion always have agreed in opposing and suppressing the various witchcrafts.

Now that religion is inglorious, one of the most fantastic of transferences of worships is that of glorifying science, as a beneficent being. It is the attributing of all that is of development, or of possible betterment to science. But no scientist has ever upheld a new idea, without bringing upon himself abuse from other scientists. Science has done its utmost to prevent whatever science has done.
 

KorbenDallas

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Thank you. Considering the time frame of his life (1874 - 1932), he could have had access to something we will never have a privilege to see.

It was the time before internet, and googling was obviously not an option at the time. This type of ideas does not just come up on its own. Something had to trigger it.
 

xtiml

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The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory by the United States from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs for a total of sixty-eight million francs.

The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River (plus New Orleans); and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

View attachment 1925
Why was this land Frances' to sell in the first place?

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904

A century later the proud people of St Louis see fit to hold a spectacular celebration to commemorate 100 years since their inception. In the intervening years St Louis had gone from a small traders stop strategically positioned along a bend in the Mississippi River to a bustling cosmopolitan metropolis.

January 10, 1899 - Louisiana Purchase Convention convention of 90 delegates from states & territories of Louisiana Purchase met for purpose of considering commemoration of purchase. Delegates decided that nothing short of an international exposition would suit and decided that St. Louis, largest and most accessible city in area, would be the proper location. Missouri Historical Society also became involved in the effort.

With a stroke of their ink quills, the Delegates set in motion a course of event that over the next 5 years would see the construction of the greatest Exposition America had ever seen to date. A one George Edward Kessler was chosen as the architect.


Le Architect.

View attachment 1952
George Edward Kessler (July 16, 1862 – March 20, 1923)
was an American pioneer city planner and landscape architect.

Wikipedia says:
"Over the course of his forty-one year career, George E. Kessler completed over 200 projects and prepared plans for 26 communities, 26 park and boulevard systems, 49 parks, 46 estates and residences, and 26 schools. His projects can be found in 23 states, 100 cities, in places as far flung as Shanghai, New York, and Mexico City.

A popular myth says that Frederick Law Olmsted, who had died the year before the Fair, designed the park and fair grounds. There are several reasons for this confusion. First, Kessler in his twenties had worked briefly for Olmsted as a Central Park gardener. Second, Olmsted was involved with Forest Park in Queens, New York. Third, Olmsted had planned the renovations in 1897 to the Missouri Botanical Garden several blocks to the southeast of the park. Finally, Olmsted's sons advised Washington University on integrating the campus with the park across the street."

Some confusion over who was in fact responsible for the initial concept. Nothing suspicious but let us read on...

"...In 1901 the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Corporation selected prominent St. Louis architect Isaac S. Taylor as the Chairman of the Architectural Commission and Director of Works for the fair, supervising the overall design and construction. Taylor quickly appointed Emmanuel Louis Masqueray to be his Chief of Design. In the position for three years, Masqueray designed the following Fair buildings: Palace of Agriculture, the Cascades and Colonnades, Palace of Forestry, Fish, and Game, Palace of Horticulture and Palace of Transportation, all of which were widely emulated in civic projects across the United States as part of the City Beautiful movement. "

View attachment 1953
"Museum of Science and Industry, in Jackson Park, Hyde Park, Chicago IL, USA 2008"
Courtesy of Emmanuel Louis Masqueray -apparently.

Curious to find that an entire generation of grecco-roman buildings popping up around this time period. Sure multiples of the same building could have been built at this time or just as possible they already existed.

The temporary city.

U-S-History.COM has this to say about the construction of the Louisiana purchase Exposition:

"Nearly all the structures built during the fair were intended to be temporary. They were therefore constructed of staff, a mixture of plaster of Paris and hemp fibers. Following the fair, many of the structures were razed. Some of the buildings were spared, and they exist today."

OK hemp sacks and plaster, bear this in mind as this is idea of burlap sacks and plaster crops up again and again when investigating these expos which we'll cover in later articles. Now back to Kessler...
Kessler says, now this is important:

"Planning", wrote Kessler, "should be comprehensive. Even though a grand urban design could only be realized in bits and pieces, and over a long period of years, still we should always know where we are going. Each bit and piece should be understandable by reference to the great plan of which it is a part."

This was a man who built for longevity. He made no move with out firstly considering the future. "Future proofing" as they say nowadays. Are we supposed to believe that he developed an entire city out of hemp sacks and plaster? I'm no expert on building but how would that even be possible. Sure the internal frames could be wood and so on but look at the smooth finish on these walls...

View attachment 1954
Look closely. those are people standing up on that building.
That's either some very strong hemp sack or some very brave people.


Build it and they will come.

October 1901 - Ground plan with original buildings approved. Four principal executive divisions were organized - Director of Exhibits, Exploitation, Works, and Concessions & Admissions. Twelve main exhibit palaces recommended for erection:

  • Education 277,945 sq. ft.
  • Art, Four Sections (Main, E, W, S)198,448
  • Liberal Arts 393,760
  • Varied Industries 447,900
  • Manufactures 588,000
  • Machinery 412,800
  • Electricity 290,200
  • Transportation 684,254
  • Agriculture 800,000
  • Horticulture 240,000
  • Forestry and Fish and Game 180,000
  • Mines and Metallurgy 395,592

View attachment 1927
Wow looks like a whole lotta' fun.

  • Construction started: December 20, 1901
  • Construction finished: No Information.
  • Total construction time: No Information.
  • Opening: Initially July 1, 1902. Postponed until April 30, 1904
  • Closure: December 1, 1904
  • Total Expo operation time: 185 days (closed Sundays)
  • Visitors: 19,694,855
  • Ticket Cost 1904\(2018): US$0.50\(US$13.45)
  • Cost of the project in 1904\(2018): US$15,000,000\(US$403,503,095.26)
  • Profits 1904\(2018): US$6,402,308\($172,223,406.32)
  • No. Buildings constructed: over 1,500 buildings
  • Site of venue: Forest park, St Louis, 200-acre (4.9 km2)
  • Demolished: No information
  • Remaining buildings: (Palace of Fine arts - Currently St Louis Art Museum, Brookings Hall Administration building - Currently administrative offices for Washington University, “Flight Cage”(Exotic bird aviary).
View attachment 1940
Palace of Fine arts

View attachment 1947
Front entrance to Palace of fine arts.
Twice as large as the Columbian expo of Chicago held 10 years earlier and 10 times larger than the one held in Buffalo the Louisiana purchase expo covers an enormous 1,270 acres (510 hectares).

View attachment 1936
Louisiana purchase exposition, Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 1904.

View attachment 1949
Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 2018.
"As many people were curious about this up and coming city, many reporters and photographers attended the World Fair to document and understand the city. What they found was nothing like anyone else could have imagined. Still as a relatively new city, the streets were buzzing with activity, with many of its citizens constantly on the "go" and the streets "crowded with activity". One observer remarked that, at this time, St. Louis had more energy in its streets than any other Northern Street did." https://en.wikipedia.org

View attachment 1951
"Electric light, then a recent innovation, was used extensively for illumination and decoration." www.u-s-history.com
Remember this was all temporary. Hemp and plaster folks.


View attachment 1929

The exhibition is grand in scale and had a lengthy preparation, with an initial $5 million committed by the city of St. Louis through the sale of city bonds was authorized by the Missouri state legislature in April 1899.

An additional $5 million was generated through private donations by interested citizens and businesses from around Missouri, a fundraising target reached in January 1901.


The final installment of $5 million of the exposition's $15 million capitalization came in the form of earmarked funds that were part of a congressional appropriations bill passed at the end of May 1900.

The fundraising mission was aided by the active support of President of the United States William McKinley, which was won by organizers in a February 1899 White House visit.

There were 253 exhibit buildings and structures built by the Exposition, 13 constructed by Washington University, 34 national buildings, 45 State, Territorial and Municipal buildings, 92 Philippine buildings and other structures, 74 other buildings, and 448 Concession buildings.

The fair's 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) site, designed by George Kessler, was located at the present-day grounds of Forest Park and on the campus of Washington University, and was the largest fair (in area) to date. There were over 1,500 buildings, connected by some 75 miles (121 km) of roads and walkways. It was said to be impossible to give even a hurried glance at everything in less than a week. The Palace of Agriculture alone covered some 20 acres (81,000 m2).

This is the end, beautiful friend.

The Louisiana purchase exposition may truly have been the most breath taking exposition ever held. Between the Baroque grecco-roman super structures and the share number of activities available on any given day its hard to imagine something like this even being possible in today's world. There is no way all these buildings would have been cost effective with such a short season of a measly 185 days, with a total cost of US$15,000,000 and a net profit of only US$6,402,308. The Expo made a loss of US$8,597,692. That's the modern day equivalent of US$231,279,688.94 as of 2018 . I cant help but feel there are important things we aren't being told about the Exposition phenomenon of the late 1800's/early 1900's.

View attachment 1955
Gutted Missouri state pavilion. Which was destroyed by fire 19 Nov.
Two weeks before the fair closed.

There is little information to go one but soon after its closure the fair fell into disrepair and over the next few years all the structures were demolished allegedly due to their temporary nature. However there are a few remaining examples and we know from the Palace of fine arts that not all the structures were false. This building is clearly stone and we can see this today. But I could have told you that from looking at the period photos. Are we supposed to believe that these other clearly stone buildings were all made from paper mache and potato bags?



Yup. It's stone.
Then.
View attachment 1935View attachment 1941
You can only read so much from a photograph
but does this look temporary to you?

Now.
View attachment 1957View attachment 1956
Even If it was all just temporary surely that was better than this,
why not just build it all again but this time
not out of bean bags and bubble gum?

Was there a large scale conspiracy conducted by unknown persons to masquerade previously established cities and townships of an earlier culture as merely temporary show ground attractions? Was this facade then used to justify the demolition of these cities and the gradual erasing of its population and their achievements from our history books?

an interesting you tube channel surmises these buildings were free energy much evidence for this,the degenerate parasites didnt like free as they bundle wires and energy not free, they destroyed all free energy technology.film of cable cars no cables overhead running free on tracks
 

KorbenDallas

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an interesting you tube channel surmises these buildings were free energy much evidence for this,the degenerate parasites didnt like free as they bundle wires and energy not free, they destroyed all free energy technology.film of cable cars no cables overhead running free on tracks
It does appear that quite a few of those buildings had the intricate design they had to accommodate for the atmospheric electricity, yep. Very little evidence we have left to put things together.

As far as street cars go, those are more complicated t figure out from the outside: 19th century compressed air cars and street cars: gone and forgotten
 

KorbenDallas

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Yes it appears that the spires and peaks of these buildings acted as receivers. They were practical firstly and ornamental secondly.
The only question is what they were really used for. The only thing we can come up with is electricity, but there are probably a whole bunch of things they could have been used for.
 

whitewave

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I find is absurd in the extreme to expect us to believe that 1500 buildings were constructed in a 7 month period when the amount of daylight hours was about 9-10 hours a day and the electricity hadn't even been put up yet. And construction started 5 days before Christmas? In the winter? Sounds legit.

There's a (as in one-singular) house being built down the street from me that has taken 7 months already and they still aren't finished. The expos army of construction workers, delivery drivers, worker support teams (eateries, bathrooms, first aid stations, and so on) to accommodate this horde of people all working in the same area at break-neck speed (1500 buildings in 7 months!) would surely have seen more tramplings than are reported.

The Kraken: I traced my geneology back to the 1200's but got bored with it. It's not like I ever get invited to the castle anyway, LOL. It occasionally gets a little sketchy from the 1300's to the 1500's (confusing may be a better word) but that time frame has precious little information other than names. Past the 1500's I started getting more info like occupations, etc.
 

wizz33

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Everything is evolving to a certain degree. A slave thinking that he is a free person, is probably the best slave to possess. This slave will never fight for the freedom he does not know exists.
this is Q territory !!!!!
some is feeding autisits on 4 and 8 chan questions to unravel this question
see Qproofs and http://qanon.news
i have been following it since November and it let me to this site via giants and Antarctica.
I think that it is the president with the NSA and the chiefs of staff and MI unit 370
he has hinted at Tesla.
Uncle Trump was working for tesla and his farther worked with the Sedona air ship (UFO) guys.

Btw i think Tartary had 3d print tech on this line for both metal and stone.
and Tartary was a grand master with comperssed air.
so they could us something lithe the pic to get unlimited movement.
but i think they were just discovering electricity and radio at time they vanished.

Fig17.gif
 

humanoidlord

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this is Q territory !!!!!
some is feeding autisits on 4 and 8 chan questions to unravel this question
see Qproofs and http://qanon.news
i have been following it since November and it let me to this site via giants and Antarctica.
I think that it is the president with the NSA and the chiefs of staff and MI unit 370
he has hinted at Tesla.
Uncle Trump was working for tesla and his farther worked with the Sedona air ship (UFO) guys.
Q is a LARPer trying to make the not awakened guys think they know the ultimate truth and worship donald trump as their god, of course no one of them answers the cornerpiece question: if he is one of the good guys, then why did his uncle steal the documents of one of the most important people to have ever lived?
 

asatiger1966

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The expo overview shows water completely around this block of land. I could generate electric energy just from the water movement. Now if there is an underground river , we could generate a lot of power. electricity and wave frequencies. The uses are endless. If some of the buildings are made of quartz or similar material, we could transmit the energy quite a distance depending on how many storage buildings were on line. The tower at the far end of the complex should be made of resonating stone and the dome made of gold to remove resistance. Only a fool would tear this machine down.

My first day to discover your site. It has helped to stimulate an old engineer. Thank You.
 

KorbenDallas

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Welcome to the forum. Those exhibitions definitrly raise a few questions, don’t they?

We have not even gone over some of the exhibited technological achievements yet.
 

sharonr

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I find this one of the more intriguing post here. I just showed the photos of the expo to my bf and asked why would they tear them down. And he said "the arch?' And then proceeded to explain the arch is more architecturally advanced than these buildings construction wise....(but not aesthetically, obviously, because gargoyles are not advanced architecture)

Anyway, look at the photo below you posted. Look at he people in the front boat. I'm sure people from all over the world came, but I find the people interesting:

 

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