1901: Pan Am Buffalo and why these Pan Ams were as insane as they look

perplexed

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What we are lacking is any proof of construction. We can speculate saying that this picture looks more like construction vs. demolition. In all of the possible "construction" pictures we have, everything looks very old.
  • no site preparation photos
  • no pictures of the site at 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 stage of completion
  • no construction tools visible (unless you count those wheelbarrows)
  • no transportation present
There allegedly was only one building built to last. It was the New York State building. The building that houses the Buffalo History Museum was constructed in 1901 as the New York State pavilion for that year's Pan American Exposition, and is the sole surviving permanent structure from the exposition.

Where is any evidence of construction? What equipment was used to bring those granite looking pillars to the site?

What cranes were used to elevate those statues? Where are the scaffolding images?


Then we have this Temple of Music building with a pretty large open space inside. Allegedly constructed of wood.

The Temple's auditorium was capable of seating 2,200 people, and contained one of the largest pipe organs ever built in the United States.


And these musical organs are designed, and built to a specific building they are going to be in. You can not just stick one into a building and expect it to work.

Here is an unrelated pipe organ story: Pipe organ at Village Presbyterian Church is finding its voice.
And this 1901 Buffalo Pan-Am pipe organ could be problematic to explain, for hardly any of us have an idea, what it takes to build a pipe organ: The 101 of organ building. 1901 expo had one of the biggest one ever built in the US.

* * * * *​

Too many things do not add up. And every other expo has similar problems.

Every single Exposition, or Exhibition to ever take place before like 1920 was demolished.
There are standard-issue numerology fingerprints all over this absurd hoax (dates and numbers of supposed workers etc)
And by hoax I'm not saying the event never took place, my opinion falls in line with the "create a real event with a false narrative to rewrite history so we can hide something"

Like the modern day crisis actors moved from one false flag/hoax media event to another, this production (exposition) and many others of the day, appears to have been enacted as a cover for the demolition of historical artifacts and cities that directly contradicts the upoming narrative to be spun thru the total control of education and media. Scrubbing the archives of libaries, state and local municipalities is an onerous task. Somewhere exists docmentation, in whatever form, that these expo grounds existed, built by previous inhabitants. So better to create a (minimally) documented grand event, replete with an absurd narrative that it all was temporary, than to get cornered into defending the premise that the site(s) never existed.

The lie is so big, and humans are so gullible, that this was easy to pull off. This totally falls in line with all the great fires, which appears to have been a cover for the removal of large swaths of real estate that painted a picture that the current ruling class needed to white wash away.
 

LordAverage

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I would like to give a shoutout to the OP for 'playing devils advocate' so to speak, at least I appreciate trying to defend the more mainstream explanation of something, we aren't always gonna be on point with our conjecture, reality checks (not that i'm saying he is even 100% right here) are useful, in our "alt history" bubble we can get carried away most likely. Hopefully he wasn't scared off by the rebuttals. The fantastic is fun but sometimes truth is just the boring truth (but there is plenty of fantastic to discuss aha)
 
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anotherlayer

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I would like to give a shoutout to the OP for 'playing devils advocate' so to speak, at least I appreciate trying to defend the more mainstream explanation of something, we aren't always gonna be on point with our conjecture, reality checks (not that i'm saying he is even 100% right here) are useful, in our "alt history" bubble we can get carried away most likely. Hopefully he wasn't scared off by the rebuttals. The fantastic is fun but sometimes truth is just the boring truth (but there is plenty of fantastic to discuss aha)
thanks for the shout. i am absolutely delighted with how this all turned out. i think we've all come to some unagreed-agreement that ok, this was built and demolished, made of steel, wood, plaster and staff. i definitively provided more than enough proof that there was nothing on the site prior to 1899. i've shown work in progress (or deconstruction, no shame in selling off the steel and wood), i've identified the surrounding buildings and all the dates match up.

i might not be able to have explained all the Expos, but the 1901 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo began construction in 1899 and demolished in 1901. it can be taken off the list if the topic is 'Pan Ams were set out to rid the US of hyperborean architecture'. Chicago feels like an entirely different story. the Pan Am in Buffalo was simply to murder McKinley and put Roosevelt in place.
 

KorbenDallas

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Not so fast :).

We do not really know who those people were. From what I see in the pictures from those times, we have too many bizarre breaks where people seem to go for a street walk way less. I noticed an interesting trend with Russia. It has a lot of 1860s photographs where streets are lacking people. For the United States this time frame is pushed closer to 1900s. At some point we will get to Europe, I hope.

One thing to remember in this all is that in the last 100 years we have added approximately 6 billions of population. During the previous 10,000 years we only managed 1.4 blns or so. That is strange. While we can blame epidemics, wars and other things for people not having enough procreative sex, it still would not make sense. Especially when we consider examples similar to Paris catacombs which have 6 millions of people within the first 1.2 miles of the tunnel.

When we take into consideration all the world architecture of various types, Industrial Revolution and other achievements produced vs. official population numbers, and events happening simultaneously (wars, floods, epidemics, etc)... things do not add up.

Our unfortunate most recent annihilation time frame could be pushed way closer to our present time. Way too close for comfort.

Those structures could be built by people who did not live to see the light of day.

Just my hypothesis though.

—- update 8.23.18 —-​

@Apollyon, @anotherlayer, @CyborgNinja

Organ installation timeframe: 1941 - 1967

Sorry, I could not help it. Immediately recalled this Pan Am expo with its organ installed within like a year or so.

Apollyon created this topic here: Demolition of Mercer Arena reveals hidden piece of Seattle history and I immediately thought about the 1901 Buffalo Pan Am.

26 years vs 1year. That’s some interesting fact.

PSTOS - Civic Ice Arena, Seattle Washington
 
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Magnetic

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I was looking for proofs of past civilization in places around where I grew up and stumbled upon the Buffalo Pan-American Exposition and thought of doing a thread on it but I checked here first and found this thread. It seems that the Erie canal was dug out and it had some impressive engineering which includes a bridge that carries the entire canal above the Genesee river, the Lockport locks and other wonders and since it ends in the Buffalo area, it would seem natural that previous civilization structures would be found there.

I did find a picture of the demolition of one of the bridge columns
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It seems to have a very thick deep base that will not let go of the structure itself which tends to indicate a very strong tensile strength throughout the structure which 2 by 4's and lath would be incapable of showing. In the fore ground is a lot of lumber which is to be expected but there seems to be a messy destruction in the middle left.
Part of the rider on the top of the sculpture seems to have come off and is falling. I would like to find more construction and destruction photographs to firm up this photograph's indication.

The lighting effects reminded me of the San Francisco Exposition and here are some photographs
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Tesla's name shows up here as the inspiration for the lighting but there's not one photo of him there or a speech or any proof whatsoever.

The blown up picture of the process of demolition of one of the towers of the bridge is puzzling once I blew it up for this page, it seems there is no base connected to the structure and there doesn't seem to be any device causing it to begin to topple. They may be jacking it from the bottom but if that is so, it is a perilous way for the workers safety to destroy it. If it is made of wood why not splash some kerosene and set it on fire? That seemed to work for the other expositions!
 
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ISeenItFirst

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I was looking for proofs of past civilization in places around where I grew up and stumbled upon the Buffalo Pan-American Exposition and thought of doing a thread on it but I checked here first and found this thread. It seems that the Erie canal was dug out and it had some impressive engineering which includes a bridge that carries the entire canal above the Genesee river, the Lockport locks and other wonders and since it ends in the Buffalo area, it would seem natural that previous civilization structures would be found there.
I did find a picture of the demolition of one of the bridge columns View attachment 13268
It seems to have a very thick deep base that will not let go of the structure itself which tends to indicate a very strong tensile strength throughout the structure which 2 by 4's and lath would be incapable of showing. In the fore ground is a lot of lumber which is to be expected but there seems to be a messy destruction in the middle left.
Part of the rider on the top of the sculpture seems to have come off and is falling. I would like to find more construction and destruction photographs to firm up this photograph's indication.
The lighting effects reminded me of the San Francisco Exposition and here are some photographs



View attachment 13269


View attachment 13270View attachment 13271
Post automatically merged:


Tesla's name shows up here as the inspiration for the lighting but there's not one photo of him there or a speech or any proof whatsoever.
Post automatically merged:



The blown up picture of the process of demolition of one of the towers of the bridge is puzzling once I blew it up for this page, it seems there is no base connected to the structure and there doesn't seem to be any device causing it to begin to topple. They may be jacking it from the bottom but if that is so, it is a perilous way for the workers safety to destroy it. If it is made of wood why not splash some kerosene and set it on fire? That seemed to work for the other expositions!
Yep, think you hit it on the head with the toppling. As well as your concerns with it. A bit of a catch 22. Seems to me, wood and staff would show flexing and breakage at that angle, but it doesn't make much sense to try to topple it this way if it is really solid and heavy.

Think the piece of the rider falling is actually just damage to the photo, but not sure.
 

Magnetic

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My tentative hypothesis is that there were mud covered reset buildings that were already there but had to be excavated. Plaster is a perfect cover for brick that has been weathered and gives a "fresh new look" to the structures. All of the smaller structures were constructed with wood, hemp fiber/chicken wire(they say different things in different articles) and plaster. The Electric building at 375 feet they admit had steel girders but its look is 100% reset but the rest of the buildings that exhibit bilateral symmetry of the Exposition and ornate round buildings are reset.

buff expo map.jpeg
 
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anotherlayer

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Oh, this old grimy thread :) We built the Pan Am with our hands and our horses. I will still get the same question "oh, are you sure those construction photos are not deconstruction photos?". The answer is, yes, I am sure. I did the simple work of hitting up the Buffalo Historical Society and I poured through a few boxes of meticulously labeled photos from construction day 1 to deconstruction day 365.

The Pan Am Buffalo was built by us. There are plenty of old world examples that still survive all throughout the city. If there was an effort to cover anything up, they would have taken down the old Post Office and the old City Hall.

There were no buried buildings. It was the last remaining chunk of farmland in the midst of a very burgeoning city. It was not located in a hidden area, it was surrounded by beautifully new built houses as the city extended itself. By 1901, Buffalo had the most millionaires per capita. I own a building where I have actual newspaper classified ads from the original owner (building was his old blacksmith/stable built behind his house, 1889). He was renting bedrooms and promised a pleasant 15 minute ride to the Expo in his personal carriages. I have a presentation (actually up on youtube, but it's horrible) that lays out his emigrating to the US in 1850. As a local house history researcher, I went very deep with it. All the years, all the stories, all the newspaper clippings, all the military records, all the business listings, all the cemetary plots, the meeting with the great grandson of this man who was in fact named after him... 1901 is 1901. Buffalo was the exact city it is today. We didn't have the money to tear down all the Tartarian buildings, so you can squint on a good day downtown and see a bit of the past. Shorpy Buffalo isn't too far off the mark.

Anyway, there was no magical Atlantis under the ground. There were no hidden canals that went no where but around and around and around. It's a fantasy world where we absolutely had the wherewithal to pull it off.

The only thought I can hang on to is that the dating is flat out skewed. Somehow this 1901 maybe was 1801 and we've smashed years in again. And something very unbelievable happened to shift our reality within the last 150 years.
 

trismegistus

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The only thought I can hang on to is that the dating is flat out skewed. Somehow this 1901 maybe was 1801 and we've smashed years in again. And something very unbelievable happened to shift our reality within the last 150 years.
My family emigrated from England/Ireland in the late 1800s to the Buffalo area.

IMG_2132.jpg


The lady in white towards the back is ostensibly my great great Aunt Cecila (everyone called her Aunt Sis, apparently). She attended the expo, according to family history. This person was known and met by members of my family that are still alive, so using that logic the Expo definitely happened in the 1900s.

Also, how about that electric trolley?
 

BrokenAgate

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What baffles me is the fact that they went to so much effort and time to construct all of this stuff that was supposed to be temporary. Why? It had to have cost millions, required years of planning and financing. Were these Pan Ams paid for by rich guys with nothing better to do, or by taxpayers? I'm pretty sure no taxpayer would be cool with paying for all this crap, only so it could be demolished and thrown in a junk yard a year later. But would bored rich guys be cool with it, either? I mean, sure, spending money profligately is what they do, but this is really extreme.

I was looking at this picture of workmen eating their lunch at the Chicago World Expo, 1891, and thinking about how much planning even this simple activity would have required. 40,000 men were employed in making everything. Imagine the amount of food they ate every day for a year, and how much coordination it took to get all of that food delivered, cooked, and served. These expos were no small affairs, they were major, and it just makes no damn sense to do it all just to be temporary. At least some of the buildings had to have been there already, with just enough temporary constructions to give legitimacy to the entire place being one giant facade on the playground of the rich.

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anotherlayer

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My family emigrated from England/Ireland in the late 1800s to the Buffalo area.

View attachment 13332

The lady in white towards the back is ostensibly my great great Aunt Cecila (everyone called her Aunt Sis, apparently). She attended the expo, according to family history. This person was known and met by members of my family that are still alive, so using that logic the Expo definitely happened in the 1900s.

Also, how about that electric trolley?
Woohoo, sunny Buffalo! I "own" a building here in the city that rented out rooms for the Pan Am (I have the advertisements for it). The room included a 15 minute carriage ride to the Expo. And we too are from Ireland (county Cork) and just like everyone else, we all just magically appeared "in the late 1800s".
 

dreamtime

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Here's my thoughts about this thing, mostly based on intuition and looking at the photos, and circumvential evidence:

In the 1800s following up with the civil war the PTB that managed to sneak into American Congress, etc., connected with the Church, subsequently did those things:

  • secretly bring about "industrial revolution", which in reality meant instructing people in the know to leak certain "forgotten" knowledge into society, but this time all based on capitalist oil instead of free energy
  • initiate the industrialists into a certain level of truth in exchange for money, land, native properties, and power
  • give the industrialists free access to the Native architecture and structures, but make it their duty to demolish some of it after use

The idea was not to destroy all ancient architecture, but it was important to make the most impressive of it disappear, because everything was just way too obvious and the new official narrative for the USA made it extraordinary important to clear North America, because in contrast to Europe there was nothing there before (No Romans, No Greeks, etc.), except a couple of wild tribes.

They get the land and structures for a couple of pennies and put in some time to renovate everything for the purpose of the exposition, which indeed happened at the time. I can't see those guys doing anything more than building on pre-existing stuff. The expos were a great way for the new industrialist elite to bring the restricted tech into society.

Industrialists get the land for basically free, so only on paper all the American expositions made horrendous losses. You can't convince me those old school 19th century capitalists willfully burned all their money with creating insane buildings. Economics alone make the official story baseless!

In the example of the Pan Am, they need around 1 year to renovate the old buildings, add a couple of necessary plaster-based things, scoop out a couple of lakes and canals, and make a decent Return of Investment with the Expo. Then tear it all down like promised to the PTB.

The very idea of creating a city out of nowhere for a temporary happening is simply absurd. The only real temporary Expo structures were built with simple steel-structures, and they tried to keep most of it afterwards (Paris, for example). The real economics show themselves with how we do Expos nowadays: In areas that are designed to stand for decades, and house regular expos of various kinds. This is the only way anyone who puts money into this would do it.

Looking at this painting with an open mind all I can really see them doing during the year of construction is adding a couple of electric wires to light it all at night, and tidy things up. How long does it really take to equip that area with wiring? I think even that "simple" thing can take a whole summer.

There is no evidence the buildings were temporary. They stood for years. No one would tear it down, from an economic standpoint. You would rent the area to others as long as you have a couple of decent buildings standing there. The entire area looks like it was originally built for governance and leisure, certainly not for showing technological advances. The rational, cold, capitalist mindset of industrialization does not fit with what we see here. Does anyone really think industrialists build this way? They would have simply built a temporary 10 penny steel-tent if it were up to them. There is simply no modern economics involved here, just look at the area! This was based on beauty, built in a time where money and scarcity didn't exist, created by an entirely different civilization than what occupies America today. It is exactly the kind of architecture that can stand 1000 years without crumbling to pieces, due to the unknown texture of plaster and cement which paradoxically gets harder over time.

Do you know why the quality of these Roman style buildings is so great, like they were only just built, compared to some of the "ruins" of Central European Greko-Roman buildings of ancient times, for example in Rome? Because the church only arrived in the U.S. in around 1800 with people still living that good life, living in buildings that do not age. That is why the Know-Knothing Native American Party fought against the Catholics, and why everyone was Protestant prior to the invasion. There was a global war between ca 1700 and 1900, and the church groups won for some reason, and the Protesting parties lost. The question is how did the secret group manage to subert everything everywhere? Where did their strength come from? The two World Wars were needed to seal the deal, and make us forget that conflict.

So let's look at some of the photographs of the Expo:


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Oh wait, the last one is the St. Peters Basilica in the Vatican, more than 400 years old.

If you want to see how the PTB builds when they have the opportunity, look at this Vatican monstrosity. This is their spirit. They despise the Greko-Roman buildings they live in, because it reminds them they are occupants. But they can't live without, because the old buildings emanate a life-giving radiate energy. What they like is the exact opposite: chaos, darkness, no windows, no dignity. Their spirit is in all the post-WW architecture.

Back to the Pan Am Expo: Ultimately they tore it down because this kind of architecture and buildings were not fit for the new way of life that was introduced by the capitalists: Work like a slave, nothing great exists in the world beyond yourself. The expositions just came in conveniently, they were not created to tear buildings down specifically, it just came in handy in certain locations. Most areas that were destroyed just vanished in history without any trace. The only reason we have photographs of the Pan Am is that it was decided to create a new narrative around the area which give people a rational explanation.

"Hey, there's this enourmous Native American building area in Buffalo, what we gonna do about it?"
"Well let's demolish it all"
"But whait, what about all those expos we are financing right now. Why not let some if it stay around at least until the expos are finished"
"Ok that sounds good, so we'll also have a good explanations for all those buildings for the future generations. Lets just demolish it and shoot a couple of photos afterwards, then switch photos in the time line"
 
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trismegistus

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There is actually one building that remained from the Expo, it is currently the Erie County Historical Museum.

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The building that houses the Buffalo History Museum was constructed in 1901 as the New York State pavilion for that year's Pan American Exposition, and is the sole surviving permanent structure from the exposition. As planned, the Buffalo Historical Society moved into the building after the exposition.

Designed by Buffalo architect George Cary (1859–1945), its south portico is meant to evoke the Parthenon in Athens. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987.
So...this would either imply that they specifically chose to make this building out of materials that would last 100+ years as opposed to the rest, or that the rest was made out of materials that would last the same amount of time but were torn down anyway.

The wiki for George Cary seems to implicate the former.
The pavilion was the only permanent building created for the Exposition and later became the Buffalo Historical Society, then the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, and today is the Buffalo History Museum
Let's dig deeper into George Carey, shall we? I find that research into these "architects" often reveal clues.

Cary attended and graduated from Harvard and the Columbia School of Architecture. After graduating from Columbia, Cary spent a brief apprenticeship with McKim, Mead and White in New York City. Directly after that, he went to Paris and studied at the L'Ecole des Beaux-Arts from 1886 until 1889, the first Buffalonian to do so.
Columbia school of architecture, eh? Same place that James Renwick Jr graduated from, whom I exposed in this thread on the Smithsonian Building to be at minimum a Freemason, but perhaps a completely fabricated person. No graduation date is available, either although I was able to track it down to confirm he did.

Not necessarily a strange coincidence, until you get to the family history.
In 1908, he married Allithea Birge, daughter of George K. Birge and Carrie Birge (Birge wallpaper and Pierce-Arrow cars). Cary designed features on their home at 460 Franklin Street in the Italianate style.[2] Together they had:[1]
  • George Cary, Jr. (1911-1971), who married in Marguerite Warren, a descendant of the Brevoort family, in 1934.
Wait, seriously?
Renwick was born into a wealthy and well-educated family. His mother, Margaret Brevoort, was from a wealthy and socially prominent New York family. His father, James Renwick, was an engineer, architect, and professor of natural philosophy at Columbia College, now Columbia University. His two brothers were also engineers. Renwick is buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife and father.
Two architects, both responsible for questionable historical architecture, both went to Columbia university and have family ties to the Brevoorts? Yikes.

It seems like there is relatively little information available about ol' George - - every source I can find is pretty much the same copy/paste job that Wiki has, and there are only 1-2 photos of him available (likely for the best considering that the reason I got suspicious of James Renwick Jr was that all his pictures looked like different people).

More Bits and Bobs
NY Tribune article on the Pan-Am.

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Here's a nice "construction" illustration.

The article itself is worth a read, it explains how the $10,000,000 budget (!) for the expo was gathered, allegedly.

Some more miscellaneous photos of the Pan Am

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KorbenDallas

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I think at some point we will have to deal with missing, or rather substituted time. It’s like with 5.5k of buildings built in Seattle within 18 months. We have to be real with the tech, work force and logistics. I think there is a period pertaining to the 19th century, which is entitely hidden from the public view.

What’s abundantly clear is that building technology coverup could be more real than some think. It coild also be one of the clues to the puzzle.

As far as known architects go, my 2 cents here are... some of them were tasked to restore.

Expos will take a lot of effort to crack. Here is a fun fact. Guess where the first 3 or 4 Olympics took place?
 

Seven823One

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I noticed an interesting trend with Russia. It has a lot of 1860s photographs where streets are lacking people.
Could it be due to the long exposure times during photographing back then? Sorry, if that question was already asked and answered earlier...
 

KorbenDallas

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Could it be due to the long exposure times during photographing back then? Sorry, if that question was already asked and answered earlier...
No issues here. Nope, not exposure related. There are 3 or 4 threads here where the exposure thing was covered. Additionally, I think the first video is coming from the 1880s.
 

pushamaku

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Expos will take a lot of effort to crack. Here is a fun fact. Guess where the first 3 or 4 Olympics took place?
SUMMER OLYMPICS
  1. Athens, Greece
    April 6-15, 1896
  2. Paris, France
    May 20-October 28, 1900
  3. St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    July 1-November 23, 1904
  4. London, England
    April 27-October 31, 1908
  5. Stockholm, Sweden
    May 5-July 22, 1912
  6. Berlin, Germany
    CANCELLED
  7. Antwerp, Belgium
    April 20-September 12, 1920
Source

Very cool, I did not know that St. Louis, Missouri, of all places, hosted the Olympics.

The destruction of the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in Saint Louis

Some more pics I found.

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Glumlit

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I think at some point we will have to deal with missing, or rather substituted time. It’s like with 5.5k of buildings built in Seattle within 18 months. We have to be real with the tech, work force and logistics. I think there is a period pertaining to the 19th century, which is entitely hidden from the public view.

What’s abundantly clear is that building technology coverup could be more real than some think. It coild also be one of the clues to the puzzle.

As far as known architects go, my 2 cents here are... some of them were tasked to restore.

Expos will take a lot of effort to crack. Here is a fun fact. Guess where the first 3 or 4 Olympics took place?
Have you considered that North America might be the NEXT ancient Rome? They'll have the pictures to prove it...


Oh and you mentioned the tailored suites. I remember once reading that the price of a good quality fitted suit has historically and fairly consistently been comparable to the price of an ounce of gold.
 
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