1893 Waldorf and Astoria Hotels in New York

KorbenDallas

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Sharing because these building were insane, especially the top portions:

The_Waldorf_and_The_Astoria_Hotels,_New_York_City_c1915.jpg
  • That original site was situated on Astor family properties along Fifth Avenue, opened in 1893, and designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh. It was demolished in 1929 to make way for the construction of the Empire State Building.
  • The original hotel started as two hotels on Fifth Avenue built by feuding relatives. The first hotel, the 13-story, 450-room Waldorf Hotel, designed by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh in the German Renaissance style, was opened on March 13, 1893, at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street, on the site where millionaire developer William Waldorf Astor had his mansion. The original hotel stood 225 feet (69 m) high, with a frontage of about 100 feet (30 m) on Fifth Avenue, with an area of 69,475 square feet (6,454.4 m2). The original hotel was described as having a "lofty stone and brick exterior", which was "animated by an effusion of balconies, alcoves, arcades, and loggias beneath a tile roof bedecked with gables and turrets". William Astor, motivated in part by a dispute with his aunt Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor, had built the Waldorf Hotel next door to her house, on the site of his father's mansion. The hotel was built to the specifications of founding proprietor George Boldt, who owned and operated the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, a fashionable hotel on Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with his wife Louise. Boldt was described as "Mild mannered, undignified, unassuming", resembling "a typical German professor with his close-cropped beard which he kept fastidiously trimmed... and his pince-nez glasses on a black silk cord". Boldt continued to own the Bellevue even after his relationship with the Astors blossomed.
  • Waldorf Astoria New York - Wikipedia
Astoria Hotel
Waldorf-Astoria-1903.jpg


Waldorf Hotel
Waldorf_Hotel_1893.jpg


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KD: I still cannot get used to them demolishing masterpieces like these.
 

Timeshifter

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Sharing because these building were insane, especially the top portions:


  • That original site was situated on Astor family properties along Fifth Avenue, opened in 1893, and designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh. It was demolished in 1929 to make way for the construction of the Empire State Building.
  • The original hotel started as two hotels on Fifth Avenue built by feuding relatives. The first hotel, the 13-story, 450-room Waldorf Hotel, designed by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh in the German Renaissance style, was opened on March 13, 1893, at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street, on the site where millionaire developer William Waldorf Astor had his mansion. The original hotel stood 225 feet (69 m) high, with a frontage of about 100 feet (30 m) on Fifth Avenue, with an area of 69,475 square feet (6,454.4 m2). The original hotel was described as having a "lofty stone and brick exterior", which was "animated by an effusion of balconies, alcoves, arcades, and loggias beneath a tile roof bedecked with gables and turrets". William Astor, motivated in part by a dispute with his aunt Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor, had built the Waldorf Hotel next door to her house, on the site of his father's mansion. The hotel was built to the specifications of founding proprietor George Boldt, who owned and operated the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, a fashionable hotel on Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with his wife Louise. Boldt was described as "Mild mannered, undignified, unassuming", resembling "a typical German professor with his close-cropped beard which he kept fastidiously trimmed... and his pince-nez glasses on a black silk cord". Boldt continued to own the Bellevue even after his relationship with the Astors blossomed.
  • Waldorf Astoria New York - Wikipedia
KD: I still cannot get used to them demolishing masterpieces like these.
You have got to ask why? Why would you really demolish such intricate beauty?

Progress? Aesthetically speaking that didn't work.
Functionality? We've regressed not progressed.
Money? Certainly

Hide past master buildings?

100% this is the only thing that make ultimate sence to me.

Perhaps also, they couldn't figure out how to repair and maintain them? Could not replicate them, so demolish them in the name of progress?

Look what we are left with....
 

VonKitty

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To demolish something so grand makes no sense at all. Were these buildings so easily and quickly put together that they thought nothing of it, or was there a more sinister reason for their destruction? And it’s not just the exterior but the interior was so elaborate as well - with painted frescos, marble, decorative woodwork...
Makes me wonder, was everything just completely razed, or were rooms dismantled and materials used elsewhere?
This site has good photos, just too large to upload here The ORIGINAL Waldorf Astoria Was Insanely Lavish

If you look at the Myrtle Room on the site above, look at the the oval shapes in the upper right - it looks like vents covered in lattice work ? Does anyone know what those would be for? (photo below isn’t as clear)

25070

And this site shows side-by-side comparison pics of then and now, most “then” pics being of the original hotel. So why tear down a magnificent hotel to rebuild it essentially the same but not quite as nice ?? Then & Now: NYC's Iconic Waldorf Astoria Hotel in Photos
(once again, photos are too large to upload)
 

Recognition

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To demolish something so grand makes no sense at all. Were these buildings so easily and quickly put together that they thought nothing of it, or was there a more sinister reason for their destruction? And it’s not just the exterior but the interior was so elaborate as well - with painted frescos, marble, decorative woodwork...
Makes me wonder, was everything just completely razed, or were rooms dismantled and materials used elsewhere?
This site has good photos, just too large to upload here The ORIGINAL Waldorf Astoria Was Insanely Lavish

If you look at the Myrtle Room on the site above, look at the the oval shapes in the upper right - it looks like vents covered in lattice work ? Does anyone know what those would be for? (photo below isn’t as clear)

View attachment 25070

And this site shows side-by-side comparison pics of then and now, most “then” pics being of the original hotel. So why tear down a magnificent hotel to rebuild it essentially the same but not quite as nice ?? Then & Now: NYC's Iconic Waldorf Astoria Hotel in Photos
(once again, photos are too large to upload)
Could be steam heating! Someone posted a video (might even be KD) about the use of steam heating in some of these gorgeous huge structures THAT IS STILL FUNCTIONING and heating these places. I'll try and find and link. The guy speaking said that when people start opening windows it messes with the pressure, interfering with functioning. Maybe that's what happened and they just covered up the vents:)
 

Timeshifter

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I dont beleive for a second that it was shovels, picks and horse and cart. What are we missing?

Where is the massive infrastructure?

:unsure:
 

VonKitty

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This blog site gives a good description and photos of the interior (and good posts on other historic NYC buildings) The Lost Waldorf-Astoria Hotel -- 5th Avenue at 33rd Street It says the original was destroyed because it went out of style, and some remnants were actually thrown into the ocean.

In 1928 the Waldorf-Astoria celebrated its 35th anniversary by decorating the lobby with baskets of flowers and flying flags from every flagpole. But flowers and flags could not stave off the inevitable. By now the Victorian trappings were severely out of date as modern hotels rose throughout the city.

By the end of the year the Bethlehem Engineering Corporation had purchased the “site” in a deal estimated at between $14 and $16 million. On May 3, 1929 the last guest walked out of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, ending an era in belle époque history. Within a few weeks demolition crews were ripping down the grand hotel. The Palm Garden, Peacock Alley, and the mural-walled Dining Room fell under the wrecker’s ball.

The final indignation came when architectural residue--marble statuary and columns, bronze fittings and other elements—were illegally dumped into the Atlantic fifteen miles off the coast of New York.

In the picture below, I had noticed what looks to be a drop off of sorts in the bottom right. According to the blog’s author, that’s the demolition of the Alexander T. Stewart mansion/excavation for new building.

25087
 

Timeshifter

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The final indignation came when architectural residue--marble statuary and columns, bronze fittings and other elements—were illegally dumped into the Atlantic fifteen miles off the coast of New York.
I wonder what they were really hiding and why?
 

Red Bird

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ending an era in belle époque history

They tell us here, I think.
 

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