1893: 100 MPH High Speed Electric Train

KorbenDallas

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electric_car-13.jpg

This is definitely not something I have ever heard about before. How about a 100 MPH electric train in 1893. And what's interesting, it sounds like they actually started implementing this project by grading 24 miles of the proposed real estate. Logically, this fact is supposed to mean that they did have the solution to design the above locomotive.
1893
1893_speed_train-7.jpg

1893_speed_train-12-TGV.jpg


Found this image after the above ones...
1893_train.jpg


1892
Chicago & St. Louis Electric Railroad brochure
Brochure with maps advertising the work "commenced on October 6th 1892, being rapidly pushed in both directions" for an all electric railroad line running from Chicago to St. Louis. The aerodynamics of this train showed up in our contemporary railroad industry eactly when?
  • If you ever run into a readable copy of the below brochure (Source +1), please share a link.
  • And I guess it makes the date 1892.
speed_train-55-1.jpg


The Locomotive
I doubt we will ever find out what locomotive was supposed to be used with this 1892 bullet train, but below is a picture of some 1879 one.

1879_electric_locomotive.jpg


Yup, it's pretty tiny...
germany-berlin-electric-locomotive-1879.jpg

kd_separator.jpg

KD: Well, my position on stuff like this has not changed. I think there was some inherited technology we were either incapable of harnessing, or outright not allowed to use.
  • Chicago historians appear to be thinking that the abovementioned train pertains to 1910.
    • I liked the following comparison they presented:
    • The highpoint to date of the $1.5 billion Chicago-to-St. Louis corridor high-speed rail project occurred on Thanksgiving Day 2012, when Amtrak Lincoln Service trains began operating up to 110 mph over a 15-mile stretch between Dwight and Pontiac, Ill.
P.S. I downloaded this book for my personal collection. Who knows how much longer it's gonna be up there....
 

Banta

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1893 going to Chicago? Small world again. And of course, there was a small electric train at the Exposition too.

All those people had to get there somehow!
 

jd755

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Hmm 1893.
The Chicago worlds fair had a reputed 100 mph locomotive on display, a steam one. New York Central No. 999
Although the only 'evidence' for its ability was provided by newspaper reporters at mileposts during the test run. Not exactly reliable evidence then!

However the whole story in that book, not just the images, reveals it was a proposal (and my searches on Gibiru couldn't find any evidence it became anything solid.)
First page
Second
Third

The picture on the first linked page of the man and his daughter is a mashup as evidenced by the white edge around him. A poor effort at photo manipulation to suggest the railroad was becoming reality when actually it had yet to leave the minds and paper of the people behind it.
In other words propaganda.

Of interest to me was where the motor, NOTE the singular motor, was being built. Not in the United States, the home of Edison, Tesla, Westinghouse etc. no it was being built in Germany.
As there was only one obviously the street car, for that is what it was in reality or would have been were it ever built, would have been test vehicle.

Why Germany?
Well according to the text of the article this corporation and its people were very secretive presumably to maintain a commercial advantage of being 'first' with something new, not to mention a place in history would have had the motor made overseas. Quite where the car itself was to have been built is not mentioned.

The Germans it seems were way ahead of the Americans and everyone else, and my guess would be that if the motor was ever built it would have been by Siemens.
Institute - History - The invention of the electric motor 1856-1893

But what truly staggered me is the sheer number of railroad companies there were in the United States. This is a list of all the ones that merged eventually into the Pennsylvania Railroad Company http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/Hagley/CORP NAMES.pdf
 

JWW427

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Nikola Tesla's electrified inventions, and those of other inventors at the time, were seen as threats. The JP Morgan-led PTB wanted oil, gas, and coal to survive as THE profit-making paradigm in America. It's still with us. Most trains are diesel-electric.
I believe thats why electric cars, trains, and trams were tightly controlled industries circa 1900, in my opinion. Controlled via much skullduggery, gerrymandering, and full-on corruption.
The PTB knew that if Tesla's free atmospheric energy took off and couldn't be metered, they were screwed.
Electrified EVERYTHING would have been the result.
We still inherited an electrified new age, its just that some things were left out. Things that would change profit paradigms. Sound familiar today?

Dr. Ferdinand Porsche created the world's first hybrid electric car for Austro-Daimler in 1903. They made all-electric versions too. Range was a problem just like today. Infrastructure for charging was needed. What's changed in 2019? Oil companies are dragging their feet.
Now all we have is that idiot back-pocket boy Elon Musk and his crappy "high-tech" Tesla cars that catch fire and run out of juice fast.
Musk is a new JP Morgan. His military contracts are legion, and very classified. The word is he makes (spent fuel) nuclear material batteries for aerospace use in "black" aircraft. Lithium is old tech.

Electric passenger trains of high speed capability were probably seen as a threat to the 1890's coal industry in that they were an arbiter of true change and great efficiency. Dare I say utopian? When gasoline and Diesel engines took hold, it was all over for pure electric in America as far as the big stuff.
Bye-Bye innovation.

I believe European high speed electric rail is government subsidized. Anyone know for sure?

It's a travesty there are no high speed electric trains in the USA like in Europe. Freight hauling is king.
We are stuck with inhuman airlines, airports, and suffocating crowds, as was intended from the get-go. People are seen as mere cattle.
Our slow and chronically unreliable Amtrak passenger trains stink. Good luck getting a ticket too.

JWW
 
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jd755

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Siemens.
From here On track – Siemens presents the world’s first electric railway

0615-germany-berlin-electric-locomotive-1879-eb-iv-3807-300.jpg


A new kind of railway without steam or horses – design drawing, 1879

0737-germany-zaukerode-mine-locomotive-1882-a-332-1-300.jpg


The world’s first electric mine locomotive, delivered in 1882 by Siemens & Halske for the Zaukerode mine in Saxony
From here A detour to success – The world's first electric streetcar
The world’s first electrically operated streetcar, one of Werner von Siemens' major innovations, was inaugurated on May 12, 1881 in the Berlin suburb of Gross-Lichterfelde. The 2.5-kilometer-long line connected the Lichterfelde station with the military academy. From the first day of regular service the streetcar was a great success: it transported 12,000 passengers in its first three months alone.

0255-tramway-lichterfelde-1881-a-327-1-300.jpg

Siemens & Halske also showcased an electric streetcar at the first International Electricity Exhibition held in Paris during August of the same year. Paris residents were electrified by the trip in the 50-passenger car from Place de la Concorde to the Palais de l’Industrie on the fairgrounds.

As a result, the streetcar played a key role in “increasing Siemens’ name recognition among Parisians” – as Werner von Siemens wrote to his brother Carl in Russia
.

Point being all this was prior to 1893 so could Siemens have built a 100 mph capable electric motor, on balance I would say so.
Could the secretive people in the United States have built a 100mph streetcar, hard to say really. Nothing appears to have been revealed about which company was going to build it.
Could Siemens have built the 100 mph streetcar. On balance after reading through the Siemens history pages I feel they couldn't. They did install an underground electric railway in Budapest in 1894-6. A couple of grand construction photographs here
Going underground – The first subway on the European continent

However just 10 years later Siemens did produce a 100 mph electric railcar. Speed world record in the year 1903

0788-marienfelde-zossen-high-speed-locomotive-1903-a-99114300.jpg


The contractors and their product – Representative of the Research Association for High-Speed Electric Railways in front of Siemens’ railcar, 1903

Here's the AEG competitor
87ccaf447edb8f5179eefd395aca67b2.jpg

Were the secretive Americans just speculating in some sort of financial scam?
Makes me wonder, at least. Siemens had brothers in England and Russia during these developments but not the United States.
 

Onijunbei

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The problem is did they actually have the electricity to power it.
So it's obvious that cities had electric trolley cars, but that electricity is centralized. The question I have is can it run on rail for hundreds of miles. In other words back then did they have the capability to erect all the transmission lines and transformers to apply power. A ton of electricity is lost through heat in those lines.
I wonder if coal just took over because it was easier and already in place. Plus the rail could transport that coal as well.
It takes coal to make electricity so why add in another step such as conversion when the source of electricity was already there to begin with... The coal itself...
 

jd755

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The problem is did they actually have the electricity to power it.
So it's obvious that cities had electric trolley cars, but that electricity is centralized. The question I have is can it run on rail for hundreds of miles. In other words back then did they have the capability to erect all the transmission lines and transformers to apply power. A ton of electricity is lost through heat in those lines.
I wonder if coal just took over because it was easier and already in place. Plus the rail could transport that coal as well.
It takes coal to make electricity so why add in another step such as conversion when the source of electricity was already there to begin with... The coal itself...
One one of those three pages the article said they had a dedicated power station for the railway at the Chicago end and others were intended to be built.
Reading other stuff about the street car lines it seems more often than not they too had dedicated power stations.
 

jd755

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This is the 'ego angle' or 'people angle' I was referring to on another thread.
Up above it says Siemens ran the first electric street car in 1881
On this page it says The first electric streetcar was invented by Frank Sprague, an electrical engineer who worked for Thomas Edison. Sprague installed the first large-scale electric streetcar system in Richmond, Virginia in 1888.
Someone is lying. Skill seems to be figuring out who, based on the balance of probability.

The only power station for the 100 mph street car project was at Edinburg. It was extant as there is a photograph of it on those pages. The other three or four along the route were 'mentioned'. The speculators seem to have had nothing tangible in hand just promises, hopes and assurances oh and .a motor being built in Germany'. I wonder who owned the Edinburg power station.
 

jd755

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And that book led to this one.

Whose text further suggests scam.

interurbanera00midd_0041.jpg

Which in turn led to this patent for 'improvements to an electric motor' granted in June 1884.

Then to this page
To be sure, Ledwinka didn’t come up with the idea of in-wheel propulsion himself, either. From 1884 to 1896, at least four designs for in-wheel electric motors were patented (Wellington Adams, 300827; Albert Parcelle, 433180; Edward Parkhurst, 422149; and Charles Theryc, 572036), at least a couple of them intended for use in horseless carriages, but to date we’ve found no evidence that any were fitted in such a way.
 

Starmonkey

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Nikola Tesla's electrified inventions, and those of other inventors at the time, were seen as threats. The JP Morgan-led PTB wanted oil, gas, and coal to survive as THE profit-making paradigm in America. It's still with us. Most trains are diesel-electric.
I believe thats why electric cars, trains, and trams were tightly controlled industries circa 1900, in my opinion. Controlled via much skullduggery, gerrymandering, and full-on corruption.
The PTB knew that if Tesla's free atmospheric energy took off and couldn't be metered, they were screwed.
Electrified EVERYTHING would have been the result.
We still inherited an electrified new age, its just that some things were left out. Things that would change profit paradigms. Sound familiar today?

Dr. Ferdinand Porsche created the world's first hybrid electric car for Austro-Daimler in 1903. They made all-electric versions too. Range was a problem just like today. Infrastructure for charging was needed. What's changed in 2019? Oil companies are dragging their feet.
Now all we have is that idiot back-pocket boy Elon Musk and his crappy "high-tech" Tesla cars that catch fire and run out of juice fast.
Musk is a new JP Morgan. His military contracts are legion, and very classified. The word is he makes (spent fuel) nuclear material batteries for aerospace use in "black" aircraft. Lithium is old tech.

Electric passenger trains of high speed capability were probably seen as a threat to the 1890's coal industry in that they were an arbiter of true change and great efficiency. Dare I say utopian? When gasoline and Diesel engines took hold, it was all over for pure electric in America as far as the big stuff.
Bye-Bye innovation.

I believe European high speed electric rail is government subsidized. Anyone know for sure?

It's a travesty there are no high speed electric trains in the USA like in Europe. Freight hauling is king.
We are stuck with inhuman airlines, airports, and suffocating crowds, as was intended from the get-go. People are seen as mere cattle.
Our slow and chronically unreliable Amtrak passenger trains stink. Good luck getting a ticket too.

JWW
Maybe the feedback created through the atmosphere and destroying cities caused a shift in techniques. Tesla used the ground more. I remember him screwing a lightbulb into the soil and having it light up.
The inherent danger of having that sort of catastrophe again, orchestrated or not, would have led to all that tech being dismantled as well. All the fires...
And perhaps the energy has shifted as well. Especially with all the other waves clogging our skies, I'm guessing it's no longer possible.
Boxing and blanketing us in. Cutting us off. MORE to follow...
 
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