1891 Cable Road Construction in NYC

What do you think this is?

  • Excavation of something old.

    Votes: 11 91.7%
  • Construction of something new.

    Votes: 1 8.3%

  • Total voters
    12

KorbenDallas

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Ran into the below small image from the Electrical Engineer Magazine dated with January 25 1893. Its's small, but it's pretty clear what the description below the image says.
  • Excavation exposing Electric, Gas, Water and Sewer...
1893-electrical-engineer-1.jpg

Would be nice to find a PDF of this magazine...
So I did some searching around and found this album here titled:
1893-electrical-engineer-2.jpg


BROADWAY CABLE RAILROAD
Built in 1891, the short-lived Broadway Cable Railroad ran north along Broadway, from Bowling Green at the southern end of Manhattan, uptown to 36th Street. This early form of mass transit operated by means of two giant cables (powered by centrally positioned steam engines), which ran just below street level, pulling the cable cars along the track at a steady 30 miles per hour. Unfortunately, the underground cables-and hence the trains themselves-could not be slowed down at all, even when turning corners; the sharp turn at Union Square (at 14th Street) became known as Dead Man's Curve for hurling passengers around as it navigated the bend. Constant accidents and numerous breakdowns ensured the rapid demise of the Broadway Cable Railroad.

Don't you think these people are looking at all these old pipes during the allegedly brand new construction process, which is also an excavation and say:

WTF is that?
nyc_cable_1.jpg

nyc_cable_2.jpg

nyc_cable_3.jpg

nyc_cable_4.jpg

nyc_cable_5.jpg

kd_separator.jpg

KD: Don't you just love our history?
 

Timeshifter

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Great find @KorbenDallas

Well, you are not going to run any cables through that lot are you? Also, it all appears very close to be surface.

Those pipes definitely appear weathered. I wonder how old that road they have dug up actually is, when was it first laid?

A quick search finds this 1860s image which shows the road to be cobbled

NewYorkCity1860.jpg

If this is actually broadway 1860, it could be any when tbh.

And at 33 miles long this could be any section of Broadway...

Edit. Amazing detail on those link images KD

No way these havent been underground for years...

20190826_073230.jpg


And always interesting to find things like this, given the year... the Cadi was Bill Nye show, but TV?

20190826_073624.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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All they had to do was to name this process some sort of repairs activities. But no, it had to be a new construction.

I like the part where the cables could not be slowed down. Sounds like they did not even know how to operate the contraption.

For this things not to have been questioned just demonstrated that people do not really care much about the truth. Unfortunately the years of brainwashing did the trick.
 

jd755

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Isn't that a cable powered streetcar in the background of the second picture?

The cable cars had a mechanism that gripped the moving cable and a brakeman who manually operated a brake to slow the car down. That deadmans corner stuff reads like makeitup journalism.

The gas pipes are cast iron and to me at least some labelled G will be water.
The group of pipes with their ends open are conduits for electric cables just laid. None of the pipework or valves has been underground for that long going off my experience of working on buried pipes in the shipyard. Yes its only my experience but there it is.

When did NY get piped gas, piped water, sewers, telephones?
 

JWW427

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Broadway and 23rd is where the famous Flatiron building resides today.
When I lived in NYC, I met people who explored the underworld. They said it was another universe entirely.
Hidden spaces. Dead end subway lines. Deserted stations. And big tunnels and pipes that went everywhere.
There is no doubt NYC and some of its infrastructure is as old as the Catskills. No exaggeration.
Civilizations build atop the older ones. It's a constant in our reality. Whatever is found that can't be reused, it is discarded, ignored, or removed.

What do we expect from a great city that has the mother of all pagan goddesses atop an old star fort as her gateway party piece?
Lady Liberty is Columbia, aka, Isis.

JWW
 

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