1888 Ponce de Leon Hotel in Florida

ISeenItFirst

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Don't forget, urine was an incredibly important resource in those days. Used for everything from making fabric to making gunpowder.

The Romans collected it and even taxed it.
 

Verity

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Don't forget, urine was an incredibly important resource in those days. Used for everything from making fabric to making gunpowder.

The Romans collected it and even taxed it.
Yes- China's age-old farming habits are being 'wee-shamed'. It's been an excellent source of fertiliser for millennia, but the agro-chemical giants are changing that. They used to call the collected business 'night soil'.

I bought an interesting book when I first started in on permaculture, called 'The Humanure Handbook.' Seems like it was definitely a valuable thing.
The subject is broached in that film 'Martian' where the guy gets stuck on Mars and has to find a way to feed himself till rescue too...
 

ISeenItFirst

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Yes- China's age-old farming habits are being 'wee-shamed'. It's been an excellent source of fertiliser for millennia, but the agro-chemical giants are changing that. They used to call the collected business 'night soil'.
Yep night soil, I've actually heard that term. I'd think the urine a more strategic resource, but I dunno. Both would obviously be important resources for society. Everything really. Bone and bone ash were very important resources as well. Always wanted to bring that up in regards to the Parisian and other catacombs, but thought it would grenade the topic.

Ponce de Leon always fascinated me, traipsing around the 'new world' looking for the fountain of youth.
 

Verity

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Bone and bone ash.
"Fee fi fo fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive or be he dead, I'll grind his bones to make my bread..."
The Boy (son) asked me if it was possible to make bread from bones the other day. (Hardcore traditionalist in the kitchen.)
I figured it was quite possible with some strategic thinking, and further to that, collagen-rich bone-meal is used today to literally rebuild sinews, collagen etc. It is a powdered substance- like flour.
 

ISeenItFirst

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Bone and bone ash.
"Fee fi fo fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive or be he dead, I'll grind his bones to make my bread..."
The Boy (son) asked me if it was possible to make bread from bones the other day. (Hardcore traditionalist in the kitchen.)
I figured it was quite possible with some strategic thinking, and further to that, collagen-rich bone-meal is used today to literally rebuild sinews, collagen etc. It is a powdered substance- like flour.
I dunno. I've tried to make a few alternate breads. Is tough, nothing levens like gluten.
Having just now checked, I feel the mainstream sources really downplay the utility of all of these resources.

Anyways to get back to this crazy hotel, if you download the picture, and look real close, almost every single chimney stack has a rod sticking off the top with what looks like a loop at the top. You can see it best on the right half of the photo.
 

Ice Nine

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I dunno. I've tried to make a few alternate breads. Is tough, nothing levens like gluten.
Having just now checked, I feel the mainstream sources really downplay the utility of all of these resources.

Anyways to get back to this crazy hotel, if you download the picture, and look real close, almost every single chimney stack has a rod sticking off the top with what looks like a loop at the top. You can see it best on the right half of the photo.
That helps get the mysterious energy fireplace theory up on it's feet.
 

whitewave

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Watched the video and was really hoping someone had figured out how these things worked. He gave a good guess but I'm wanting one for my living room and could use some schematics. :) There were a lot of comments but they're all in Russian. I like being able to read comments on videos because you get more than one perspective and many times the commenters point out things you might have missed.
 

Ice Nine

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Sorry I'm quoting myself, I know how gauche .

The fireplaces weren't to burn wood or anything in. It all has to do with the andirons in front, the metal plate on the back of the "fireplaces" and some pipes you can't see in this photo. The fireplaces drew energy from antenna I suppose, the pipes are attached to the andirons and the metal plate in the back would heat up and radiate heat out to keep you nice and warm. And they, all the "fireplaces' have a round dial over them, could be clocks, could be something else. I'll look for more old interior photos..
Er nobody was burning anything in here, this is from 1890 and not converted to gas or anything.

Found a website with lots of historic pictures - loads of pictures of the hotel

1890 mantel.jpg

hotel 1.jpg
 

dreamtime

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Thinking about those "fireplaces" I am convinced now that they were originally used to convert some kind of energy into heat. The only thing I haven't figured out is when people collectively forgot to use this technology. Because people tend to use the style of the technology of the past and copy it without knowing the essence, or change it into decoration for example (that's why modern fireplaces "evolved" from this old heating system), so who knows how long they just kept all of this as nice deco.

One mystery is the complete lack of information in the literature, which makes everything hard to date.
 

Ice Nine

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Maybe they were peeing in the pool. This pool is either in the Ponce De Leon or the Casino pool at the Alcazar Hotel. Same time period and the photo say one place it's the Alcazar and others the Ponce. Please notice the American flag, a bit unusual.

16480

I did some more diggin it's the pool in the Alcazar Hotel, here it is now. Sorry for the error. More about the Hotel in the appropriate thread.
19th century St. Augustine, Florida architecture


16481



 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Fantastic photo.
Does this explain the flag? The Original 13 States of the United States of America

WOW! All because of a misspelled search!
Hotel Ponce de Leon, St Augustine Florida
It says the following in there:
  • When construction of the hotel began in 1885, St. Augustine was still an isolated town with sand and shell-covered roads. Hotel builder and Florida east coast developer Henry M. Flagler and his architects, Carrere and Hastings, carefully considered the architectural style of their new hotel in the "ancient city." During a 1909 interview with a newspaper reporter, Flagler was asked what he considered to be the hardest thing he had done in Florida. He replied: "Building the Ponce de Leon. Here was St. Augustine, the oldest city in the United States. How to build a hotel to meet the requirements of nineteenth century America and have it in keeping with the character of the place - that was my hardest problem."
Re-read it like 5 times already. What character of the place is he talking about?

Additionally it was interesting to learn that St. Augustine is considered to be the oldest city in the US.
  • Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia – 1638.
  • Boston, Massachusetts – 1630.
  • Quincy, Massachusetts – 1625.
  • New York City, New York – 1624.
  • Plymouth, Massachusetts – 1620.
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico – 1610.
  • Jamestown, Virginia – 1607.
  • St. Augustine, Florida – 1565.
Yeah, nowadays we only get ugly "brutalist" architecture, of all the ones i have seen there are only 3 that are somewhat decent.
St. Augustine is an interesting place with this "poured concrete" technique, as we as their 35+ hotels of this magnitude within a community of 5,000 people.

This St. Augustine gives out a weird vibe.
 

whitewave

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Additionally it was interesting to learn that St. Augustine is considered to be the oldest city in the US.
St. Augustine, Florida – 1565.
St. Augustine is an interesting place with this "poured concrete" technique, as we as their 35+ hotels of this magnitude within a community of 5,000 people.
This St. Augustine gives out a weird vibe.
Kind of slipped up with that "ancient city" remark, didn't he? Did you get St. Augustine's date of origin from wiki? When I lived there in the mid-late 70's there were plaques all over that said the city was founded in 1495 which always seemed odd to me since I don't think Columbus got as far as Florida and the rest of the conquerors didn't arrive til much later supposedly. Lots of beautiful architecture when I was there. Their college building was absolutely stunning. Three story building with painted ceiling, marbled floors, carved staircases. Haven't been back so I'm wondering if any of the plaques are still there.
 

whitewave

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Maybe if someone lives there or plans on visiting soon. As I recall, there were at least 3 plaques where I remember reading that but, like I said, I haven't been back-not sure if they're still there. Didn't think much about it back in the 70's. Sorry.
 
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