1887-88: Gran Hotel Internacional in Barcelona

Skydog

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Gran Hotel Internacional
Barnabus Nagy alerted me to this absolute gem. The construction began in the middle of the month of December 1887 and the 14 of February 1888 finished the works of the building.
  • It had floor and four floors of height of 150 m by 35 m, occupying a lot of 5,000 m2.
  • Its capacity was for 2,000 guests in 600 rooms and 30 apartments for large families.
  • Gran Hotel Internacional in Barcelona was completed in a record 53 days?
  • In the middle of January, it was decided to work at night, using eighteen large electric lights, and the personnel brigades were structured which in total were made up of 650 masons and laborers, 100 carpenters and 40 plasterers
  • Hotel Internacional (Barcelona) - Wikipedia
It took another month to complete the interior finishes and decorations though..

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Timeshifter

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Ahh, the old 'mezanine' floor...

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Look at the size of those doors behind the gents.

Looks like 3 months is the new accepted construction time all around the 19th century world.

Constructed December - February, 3 darkest months of the year, about 6 hours daylight on a good day. How well does new plaster etc fair in cold & rain?

Great time the start this build.

Built on a steel platform on land to get washed away or reclaimed by the sea.

Is this another of those floating church type builds? Boat church
 

BStankman

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This is a great lead. The hotel was part of the Universal Exhibition of 1888.
1888barcelona.jpg

The hotel was built in 69 days.


exposicion-universal-de-barcelona-de-1888-6.jpg


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Unlike our other expos, the hotel is the only important building that did not survive. Breaking the narrative that these were shoddy temporary constructions.

arc_de_triomf_1888__autor_desconegut_0.jpg


Arc_de_Triomf_Barcelona.jpg


One of the highlights of the exhibition was the architecture, which are some of the chief witnesses.

Stand the triumphal arch entrance to the exhibition, designed by Josep Vilaseca, brickwork. Second, the cafe restaurant, now the Museum of Zoology, designed by Lluis Domenech i Montaner; the same architect, was the International Hotel .

A hotel of great proportions for the time and was demolished in 1889. It was located outside the enclosure, in the current Paseo Colon, where he was placed the statue in honor of the navigator, and, oddly enough, was built in only 69 days thanks to great efforts and progress of the construction technique. Iron and glass, then in vogue, was the hothouse, Josep Amargós.

Among the pavilions highlighted the Transatlantic Company of Antoni Gaudi designed by. Except for the International Hotel, all the most important buildings have survived to this day.

 
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Skydog

Skydog

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The hotel supposedly didn’t have a foundation - which is crucial to the ~2-month timeline story given the length of time a foundation typically needs to set properly. Instead of a foundation, the hotel was said to be built upon a massive metal plate to give it support. How one was able to produce such a massive customized metal plate in 1887 is a challenge to say the least.

What I’m struggling with is why the ~2-month timeline is so important to maintain in this story in the first place? What was happening in Barcelona at the time where this hotel only makes sense to appear on the scene in 1887/1888?
 

KorbenDallas

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Here is the wiki page for this Barcelona Expo:
The main legacy of the 1888 World Fair is the Ciutadella Park: the World Fair served as the opportunity for Barcelona to rid itself of the hated citadel and transform it into a central park for the city's denizens.

I would like to see that specific citadel.

A citadel is what?


In 1714, after a thirteen month long siege, Barcelona fell to the army of king Philips V during the war of the Spanish Succession. In order to keep firm control over Barcelona, the Bourbon king built the largest fortress in Europe, a star-shaped citadel or 'Ciutadella'. A large part of the Ribera district was demolished to make way for this fortress.
The neighborhood was rebuilt thirty years later at another location as 'Barceloneta'.
 

Recognition

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This is a great lead. The hotel was part of the Universal Exhibition of 1888.

The hotel was built in 69 days.



Unlike our other expos, the hotel is the only important building that did not survive. Breaking the narrative that these were shoddy temporary constructions.
One of the highlights of the exhibition was the architecture, which are some of the chief witnesses.

Stand the triumphal arch entrance to the exhibition, designed by Josep Vilaseca, brickwork. Second, the cafe restaurant, now the Museum of Zoology, designed by Lluis Domenech i Montaner; the same architect, was the International Hotel .

A hotel of great proportions for the time and was demolished in 1889. It was located outside the enclosure, in the current Paseo Colon, where he was placed the statue in honor of the navigator, and, oddly enough, was built in only 69 days thanks to great efforts and progress of the construction technique. Iron and glass, then in vogue, was the hothouse, Josep Amargós.

Among the pavilions highlighted the Transatlantic Company of Antoni Gaudi designed by. Except for the International Hotel, all the most important buildings have survived to this day.
Has anyone done a thread on the Barcelona Expo? Like you said 'Unlike our other expos, the hotel is the only important building that did not survive. Breaking the narrative that these were shoddy temporary constructions.'

Pretty amazing proof/implications
Here is the wiki page for this Barcelona Expo:
The main legacy of the 1888 World Fair is the Ciutadella Park: the World Fair served as the opportunity for Barcelona to rid itself of the hated citadel and transform it into a central park for the city's denizens.

I would like to see that specific citadel.

A citadel is what?


In 1714, after a thirteen month long siege, Barcelona fell to the army of king Philips V during the war of the Spanish Succession. In order to keep firm control over Barcelona, the Bourbon king built the largest fortress in Europe, a star-shaped citadel or 'Ciutadella'. A large part of the Ribera district was demolished to make way for this fortress.
The neighborhood was rebuilt thirty years later at another location as 'Barceloneta'.
Wonder whom it was that really 'hated' this star fort
 
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KorbenDallas

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This fortress thing does not make any sense:
  • In 1841 the city's authorities decided to destroy the fortress, which was hated by Barcelona's citizens. Yet two years later, in 1843, under the regime of Maria Cristina, the citadel was restored. In 1848, after Maria Cristina's abdication and as the citadel lost its use, General Espartero razed most of the buildings within the fortress as well as its walls by bombarding it from the nearby mountain fortress Montjuic, which helped him gain political popularity.
  • Parc de la Ciutadella - Wikipedia
 

BStankman

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Wonder whom it was that really 'hated' this star fort
Some super zoom images here of the fort.
Barcelona’s remarkable history of rebirth and transformation

BNE.Barcelona.planos.1806.jpg

The old walls are said to be 15th century medieval, and the star fort is said to be 18th century.
This site does not mention any bombardment.

By 1854, when the Spanish government finally gave permission to take the wall down, it was one of the most hated structures in Europe. Townspeople immediately went at it with crowbars and pickaxes; it took 12 years to completely remove it.

Just a guess, but I tend to think it was hated because it was a reminder of the Moor occupation. This site says it was imprisoning.

In 1714, the War of the Spanish Succession ended and Barcelona (having backed the the Habsburg rather than the Bourbon claimant to the throne of Spain) was on the losing side. Upon its surrender, in order to suppress any future challenge, Philip V abolished many of the city’s institutions and charters, built a fortress citadel to keep an eye on it, and forbid Barcelona to grow beyond its medieval walls.

Remarkably, the wall around the city stayed in place — hemming in a growing population and almost completely separating the city from the sea next to it — for two more centuries. By the middle of the 19th century, population density was the highest in Spain, working conditions were miserable, sewage was out of control, water was dirty, and the city was struck by a series of cholera epidemics and riots.


Zoological museum 1888 and today. Not temporary.

Exposición_Universal_de_Barcelona_—_Entrada_al_parque_por_el_Salón_de_San_Juan_y_vista_del_C...jpg


spain-barcelona-zoology-museum.jpg
 

KorbenDallas

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As far as the above Zoological Museum goes... Here is a side-by-side, two buildings from the same expo:

spain-barcelona.jpg

Just a guess, but I tend to think it was hated because it was a reminder of the Moor occupation.
These star forts were getting demolished all over the world. Anything is possible, but lm leaning towards this star fort having some technical properties.

I’m not buying this “revenge demolition” at all.

As far as building that hotel with no foundation... sounds like they had plenty of the older ones to use.
 

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