1876: Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia

KorbenDallas

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Go Figure what that means:
  • The formal name of the Exposition was the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, and products of the Soil and Mine, but the official theme was the celebration of the United States Centennial 1776-1876.
  • Are we being told to adjust our comprehension?
Philadelphia-PA-Worlds-Fair-1876-SM_1_3.jpg

I think this 1876 Philadelphia Expo, could be one of those things worth digging into.
  • First of all, I did not realize the buildings were so big. They were huge. In the images provided pay attention to the insignificance of humans in relation to the size of the most simple of the expo buildings.
  • The second issue to raise my suspicion, as well as my immediate interest, was an apparent difficulty locating area photographs. Don't get me wrong. There are multiple photographs out there. Not of the quality I would prefer, but we do have photographs. At the same time, I have this feeling that we are not being shown everything. Some photographs are represented by drawings with appropriate inscriptions, some of which I do not trust.
Make no mistake, this Expo was a behemoth of an event. Well, enough with this pointless intro of mine.

Almost forgot:
Interesting Fact:
  • Expo Duration - 184 days
  • 1876 US Population - 45,166,214
  • 1876 Expo Visitors - 10,000,000. Some visited more than once.
  • Visited by: 22% of the US Population (approximation, obviously was visited by foreigners as well)
  • Average Daily Visitors - 54,347 visitors
  • Whoever wants to play with 1880 US Census, be my guest. For example, 6.9 mil were under the age of 5.
In perspective:
I do understand that today's Theme Parks get visited from all over the World. Allegedly in 2019 we can travel easier and faster vs 1876. From this point of view our 1876 Expo is at a disadvantage as far as the ease of attending the event goes. In other words, for our 2019 Theme Parks, it is much easier to solicit and welcome visitors. It is also (imo) safe to assume that US theme parks get visited by vast numbers of foreign tourists. It was hardly as easy for the foreigners to visit the 1876 Expo in Philly.
In other words, for every 1 person living in the United States in 1876, in 2018 we have 7.24. For every 1 person living in the World in 1875, in 2018 we had 5.65.

Now let's compare visitor numbers of this 1876 Expo with our contemporary Theme Parks. The provided Theme Parks stats are based on yearly attendance. Our 1876 Expo was only opened for 184 days. This is not a scientific experiment. I will divide their 2018 attendance in 2, and call it "close enough".

6 months attendance: World's most visited theme parks in 2018
  1. Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World, Lake Buena Vista, Florida: 10.45 million visitors
  2. Disneyland Park at Disneyland Resort, Anaheim, California: 9.35 million visitors
  3. Tokyo Disneyland at Tokyo Disney Resort, Japan: 8.95 million visitors
  4. Tokyo DisneySea at Tokyo Disney Resort, Japan: 7.35 million visitors
  5. Universal Studios Japan, Osaka: 7.15 million visitors
  6. Disney's Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World, Florida: 6.9 million visitors
  7. Epcot at Walt Disney World, Lake Buena Vista, Florida: 6.2 million visitors
  8. Shanghai Disneyland, China: 5.9 million visitors
  9. Disney's Hollywood Studios at Walt Disney World, Florida: 5.65 million visitors
  10. Chimelong Ocean Kingdom, Hengqin, China: 5.4 million visitors
1876 vs 2018:
  • 1876 Philly Expo: 10 million visitors
    • Average Daily Visitors - 54,347 visitors
    • Area - 115 ha / 284 acres
  • 2018 WDW Magic Kingdom: 10.45 million visitors
    • Average Daily - 56,793 visitors
    • Area - 42.5 ha / 105 acres
Area Size Comparisson:
  • 1876 Expo was 2.7 times bigger than 1971 WDW Magic Kingdom
Construction:
  • 1876 Philly Expo: 22 months
  • 1971 WDW Magic Kingdom: 18 months
    • By the time the Magic Kingdom opened on October 1, 1971, more than 9,000 construction workers had labored for 18 months to build the park, which cost approximately $400 million to create.
1876 Centennial Expo
The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair in the United States, was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from May 10 to November 10, 1876, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. Officially named the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures and Products of the Soil and Mine, it was held in Fairmount Park along the Schuylkill River on fairgrounds designed by Herman J. Schwarzmann.

Expo Buildings
More than 200 buildings were constructed within the Exposition's grounds, which were surrounded by a fence nearly three miles long. There were five main buildings in the exhibition. They were the Main Exhibition Building, Memorial Hall, Machinery Hall, Agricultural Hall, and Horticultural Hall. Apart from these buildings, there were separate buildings for state, federal, foreign, corporate, and public comfort buildings. This strategy of numerous buildings in one exposition, set it apart from the previous fairs around the world that relied exclusively on having one or a few large buildings.
  • The Centennial Commission sponsored a design competition for the principal buildings, conducted in two rounds; winners of the first round had to have details such as construction cost and time prepared for the runoff on September 20, 1873. After the ten design winners were chosen, it was determined that none of them allowed enough time for construction and limited finances.
  • The Architecture of the Exhibition mainly consisted of two ways of building, the traditional masonry monuments and building of structural framework of Iron and Steel.
Buildings Size Stats:
  • Was gonna list building dimensions here, but instead will ask you to pay attention to the building descriptions. The sizes are in there.
Main Building
A temporary structure, the Main Building was the largest building in the world by area, enclosing 21.5 acres (8.7 ha). It measured 464 ft in width and 1,880 ft in length.
  • It was constructed using prefabricated parts, with a wood and iron frame resting on a substructure of 672 stone piers, the wrought iron roof trusses were supported by the columns of the superstructure.
  • The building took eighteen months to complete and cost $1,580,000. The building was surrounded by portals on all four sides, the east entrance of the building was used as an access way for carriages and the south entrance of the building served as a primary entrance to the building for street cars. The north side related the building to the Art Gallery and the west side served as a passageway to the Machinery and Agricultural Halls.
  • In the Main Exhibition Building, columns were placed at a uniform distance of 24 feet. The entire structure consisted of 672 columns, the shortest column 23 ft in length and the longest 125 ft in length. The construction included red and black brick-laid design with stained glass or painted glass decorations. The Interior walls were whitewashed and woodwork was decorated with shades of green, crimson, blue and gold. The flooring of the building was made of wooden planks that rested directly on the ground without any space underneath it.
  • The orientation of the building was East-West in direction making it well lit and Glass was used between the frames to let in light. Skylights were introduced within the structure, over the central aisles. The corridors of the building were separated by fountains, that were aesthetic and also served the purpose of cooling.
  • The structure of the building, the central avenue was a series of parallel sheds that were 120 ft (37 m) wide, 1,832 ft (558 m) long, and 75 ft (23 m) high. It was the longest nave ever introduced into an exhibition building. On either sides of the nave, were avenues of 100 feet in width and 1832 feet in length. Aisles of 48 ft wide were between the nave and the side avenues, and smaller aisles of 24 ft in width were on the outer sides of the building.
  • The exterior of the building consisted of 4 towers of 75 feet in height that stood at each of the building's corners. These towers served as small balconies or galleries of observation at different heights.
  • Within the building, Exhibits were arranged in a grid, in a dual arrangement of type and national origin. Exhibits from the United States were placed in the center of the building, and foreign exhibits were arranged around the center, based on the nation's distance from the United States. Exhibits inside the Main Exhibition Building dealt with mining, metallurgy, manufacturing, education and science. Offices for foreign commissioners were placed along the sides of the building, in the side aisles, in proximity to the products exhibited. The walkways leading to the exit doors were 10 feet in width.
  • After the Exposition, the building was turned into a permanent building for the International Exhibition. During the auction held on December 1, 1876 the building was bought for $250,000. It quickly ran into financial difficulty but continued to remain open through 1879, before being finally demolished in 1881.
CentennialExhibition_MainBuilding-e1354991704100.jpg


Machinery Hall
Machinery Hall, the second largest building in the exposition, located west of the Main Exhibition Building was designed by Joseph M. Wilson and Henry Pettit. This structure consisted of a main hall, 1,402 ft long and 360 ft wide, with a wing of 208 ft by 210 ft attached on the south side of the building. The building occupied 558,440 square feet, had 1,900 exhibitors in the Hall and took six months to construct. Much like its name, the exhibits displayed at Machinery Hall focused on machines and evolving industries.
  • The building was composed of a superstructure made of wood and glass, and rested on a foundation of massive masonry. The building was painted light blue and had 8 different entrances. The length of the building was 18 times its height. Machinery Hall was the show case for the state of the art industrial technology that was being produced at the time. The United States of America alone took up two-thirds of the exhibit space in the building.
  • One of the major attractions on display in the building was the Corliss Centennial Steam Engine that ran power to all the machinery in the building as well as other parts of the world's fair. The engine was 45 feet tall, produced 1,400 horsepower and weighed 650 tons. It had 1 mile of overhead line belts that connected to the machinery in the building. It symbolized the power of technology that was transforming the United States into an industrial nation.
  • Amenities available to the visitors within the hall were rolling chairs, telegraph offices and dinner for fifty cents. Machinery Hall had 8,000 operating machines and was filled with a wide assortment of hand tools, machine tools, material handling equipment and the latest fastener technology.
Machinery-Hall_outside.jpg


Art Gallery
Designed by Herman J. Schwarzmann, the Art Gallery building (now known as Memorial Hall) is made of brick, glass, iron and granite. Memorial Hall, the only large exhibit building to survive on the Centennial site, was designed in the beaux-arts style and housed the art exhibits.
  • It was the largest art hall in the country when it opened, with a massive 1.5-acre footprint and a 150-foot dome sitting atop a 59-foot-high structure with a 150-foot dome sitting on top. It provided 75,000 square feet of wall surface for paintings and 20,000 square feet of floor space for sculptures.The Centennial received so many art contributions that a separate annex was built to house them all. Another building was built for the display of photography.[22]
  • Schwarzmann based his design for Memorial Hall on Nicholas Felix Escaliers project for the Prix de Rome published in 1867–69. Constructed of granite, brick, glass and iron, Memorial Hall consisted of a central domed area surrounded by four pavilions on the corners with open arcades east and west of the main entrance. During the exhibition, the building along with the Art Gallery Extension directly to its rear displayed the art of many nations.
  • Memorial Hall became the prototype, both from a stylistic and organizational standpoint, for other museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago (1892–1893), Milwaukee Public Museum (1893–1897), Brooklyn Museum (1893–1924), and Detroit Institute of Art (1920–1927). Libraries like the Library of Congress, New York Public Library and Free Library of Philadelphia also emulated its form.
After the Exposition, Memorial Hall reopened in 1877 as the Pennsylvania Museum of Art and included the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. In 1928 the museum moved to Fairmount at the head of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and in 1938 was renamed the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Memorial Hall continued to house the school, and afterward was taken over by the Fairmount Park Commission in 1958. The museum school is now the University of the Arts. The building was later used as a police station and has now been renovated to house the Please Touch Museum. The Please Touch Museum exhibits a beautiful 20 by 30 foot model of the Centennial Grounds and 200 buildings.

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Agricultural Hall
The third largest structure at the Centennial was Agricultural Hall. Designed by James Windrim, Agricultural Hall was 820 ft (250 m) long and 540 ft (160 m) wide. Made of wood and glass, the building was designed to look like various barn structures pieced together. The building's exhibits included products and machines in agriculture and other related businesses.

Agricultural_Hall_at_Centennial_Exposition,_1876.jpg


Horticultural Hall
Situated high atop a hill presiding over Fountain Avenue, Horticultural Hall epitomized floral achievement, which attracted professional and amateur gardeners. Unlike the other main buildings, it was meant to be permanent. Horticultural Hall had an iron and glass frame on a brick and marble foundation and was 383 ft (117 m) long, 193 ft (59 m) wide and 68 ft (21 m) tall. The building was styled after Moorish architecture and designed as a tribute to The Crystal Palace from London's Great Exhibition. Inside, nurserymen, florists and novice landscape exhibited a variety of tropical plants, garden equipments, and garden plans. In dramatic fashion, the Centennial introduced the general public to the notion of landscape design, as exemplified the building itself and the grounds surrounding it. In terms landscape around it, a long, sunken parterre leading from Horticultural Hall became the Centennial's Iconic floral feature, reproduced on countless postcards and other memorabilia, This low garden enabled visitors to best see the patterns and shapes of the beds from the raised walkways. The building's exhibits specialized in horticulture and after the Exposition it continued to exhibit plants until it was badly damaged by Hurricane Hazel in 1954 and was demolished. As a replacement, the Fairmount Park Horticulture Center was built on the site in 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial exposition.

Horticultural Hall.jpg


Woman's Pavillion
(built by women only)
The Women's Pavilion, a project of the Women's Centennial Executive Committee, was appointed in 1873 by the United States Centennial Board of Finance. They hoped the Women's Pavilion would generate greater enthusiasm in the celebration of the fair by increasing subscriptions to Centennial stock. Much of the pavilion was devoted to what would be classified as woman's domestic production.
  • The president of the Women's Centennial Committee was Elizabeth Duane Gillespie, great grand daughter of Benjamin Franklin. Gillespie led the Women's centennial executive committee in raising money to create the first Women's pavilion in exposition history. With the help of Gillespie, the women's centennial committee reached their goal of 82,000 signatures in 2 days to raise money for the pavilion, she also helped convince Congress to give the committee more money. Female organizers of the event drew upon deeply rooted traditions of separatism and sorority, as they planned, funded and managed their own pavilion and devoted it entirely to the artistic and industrial pursuits of their gender. Their overall goal was to increase female confidence and choices, win woman's social, economic, and legal advancement, abolish unfair restrictions discriminating against their gender, encourage sexual harmony, and gain influence, leverage, and freedom for all women in and outside of the home. They had to build their own building because they lost their spot in one of the larger pavilions (Main Building) due to a large increase in foreign interest. It only took them 4 months to raise the needed funds to build the pavilion. Their goal was to only use women to build their pavilion, even to power their own building. To which they did except for one aspect which was the design of the building. The building was designed by Hermann J. Schwarzmann. The Centennial Women not only showed domestic production but they also employed a popular means for justifying female autonomy outside of the home as well. They did this by demonstrating to visitors what ways women were making a profitable living. When entering the building visitors found exhibits that demonstrated positive achievements and influence such as; industrial and fine arts: wood-carvings, furniture-making, and ceramics; fancy articles: clothing, and woven goods, philanthropy: philosophy, science, and medicine; education; literature; and inventions. The pavilion also exhibited over eighty patented inventions for example: a reliance stove, a hand attachment for a sewing machine, a dish-washer, a fountain griddle- greaser, a heating iron with removable handle, a frame for stretching and drying lace curtains, and a stocking and glove darner.
Woman's_Pavilion_at_Centennial_Exposition,_1876.jpg


Shoe & Leather Building
The structure is 314 feet long and 160 feet in width, and although not ornate in architecture is in pleasing style. The interior contains leather of all kinds – sole leather tanned with oak bark and with hemlock, union crop leather tanned with both substances, and also for upper leathers kip, calf, fine morocco, curaçoa, kid, lamb and sheep skins. The process of leather manufacture after tanning, including skiving, splitting, stripping, edge-setting and burnishing, is shown. The art of making shoes and boots is displayed, including all varieties, from the coarse brogan and plough-shoe up to the most dainty lady’s gaiter or slipper. The manufacture of leather articles, from a pocketbook to a Saratoga trunk, is illustrated, as is saddlemaking from horse and pig skin. A large steam-engine in the centre furnishes the power to run the machinery. The manufacture of shoes and boots by these means is so strongly contrasted with the methods of the old-fashioned cordwainer, who hammered on his lapstone and drew his wax-ends tight, that every one visiting this building is exceedingly pleased. The hall is well lighted. The main aisle is 15 feet wide, two parallel aisles, each 10 feet, running from east to west; they are crossed by other aisles, making 8 main exhibition spaces. Stairways lead to the second floor, which is divided into rooms at each end, and galleries on the north and south, 8 feet wide by 112 feet in length. The roof construction is divided on the cross-sections into an 80 feet span circular truss, and 16 and 24 feet sections, which are triangular in shape. The architect was Alexander B. Bary of Philadelphia; builders, J. H. Coffrode & Co. Cost, $31,000.

leather_bldg.jpg


Judges Hall
The Judges’ Hall stands on the east side of Belmont Avenue, north of the west end of the Main Exhibition Building. It is handsome in exterior appearance and finely decorated in the interior. It is 152 feet long by 115 feet wide. The towers at the four corners of the building are each 50 feet high, and have been made very ornate. The woodwork on the inside is handsome. The interior is fitted up for the use of the judges and for meetings of committees and larger number of persons. In the centre is a hall for meetings, 60 x 80 feet. In the rear is a smaller apartment, 60 x 26 feet, intended to be used for large committee meetings. These rooms can be thrown into one by taking down the partitions. There are 14 small committee-rooms, and in the second story a comfortable sitting-room. There is much taste in the construction of this Hall, which is painted upon the exterior with neutral colors, judiciously contrasted. Architect, H. J. Schwarzmann. Cost, $30,000.

Judges_Hall.jpg


Smaller Buildings
To be honest, there is nothing special in these buildings, other than human to structure ratio, as far as size goes. I did not find any photographs of the below buildings to get a better perspective. Below you will see some lithographs of the smaller Expo structures.

US Government.jpg

Source - click for more buildings

Colorado and Kansas.jpgConnecticut.jpgIndiana.jpgDelaware.jpg
Proportionwise, appears that everything gigantic. I am not sure whether it is simply my perception due to some skewed lithographs, at the same time everything does appear to be able to accommodate much taller individuals.

Exhibits Plus
I will most definitely need your help to comb through 30,000 of the exhibits presented at this 1876 Expo in Philadelphia. I have no idea where the entire 30k list is at. Here is a twelve-exhibit list to start with:
Below you can see a few I liked:

Centennial Monorail
General LeRoy Stone's steam monorail first appeared at the Centennial Exposition marking the USA's 100th anniversary in 1876. An elevated track extending about 170 yards was built in Fairmont Park in Pennsylvania. It connected the Horticultural Hall with the Agricultural Hall, and appears to have been called "The Saddleback Railroad".
The elaborately decorated double-decker vehicle had two main wheels; the rear wheel was driven by a rotary steam engine of the La France type.

  • By this date it must have been clear that rotary steam engines were inefficient, but this monorail was more of a fairground attraction than a demonstration of exemplary thermodynamics. The LaFrance Manufacturing Company of Elmira, NY had been in business for just three years, and the LaFrance brothers had met Stone's needs by adapting the rotary force-pump used for their steam fire engines.
  • This design clearly solves The Monorail Problem (ie how to avoid falling off the rail) by means of the guide rails visible at the level of the front steps. The square structure at the rear is the driver's cab, with a short funnel protruding, and smoke and steam visible.
  • Some drawings of this monorail locomotive have now been discovered, in Edward Knight's Mechanical Dictionary. (Supplementary Volume 1884). For some unknown reason Knight makes no reference to General Stone or the Centennial Exposition, but simply describes it as a "single rail railway", without naming the inventor. However, there can't have been that many rococo-style monorails running around America at the time.
  • I find the previous bullet rather interesting.
Centennial_monorail.jpg


Soils of IOWA
To be honest, I have no idea what this is, but I would love to find out. The narrative suggests that it had something to do with agriculture. I do not really care what Californian Silk Worms were doing in the State of Iowa, but these pillars with balls on top look terribly reminiscent of the suspected atmospheric/wireless electricity poles.

Soils of Iowa.jpg

Iowa in 1876 Expo

Iron Lifeboat
In its centennial look back at the Centennial Exposition, Popular Mechanics recalled the popularity of a lateen-rigged, non-capsizable iron lifeboat on display. It boasted luxuries no one had ever seen before in a lifeboat: covered accommodations for females and children, arrangements for water-saving, mail box, and required no lowering device.
  • Please share its image, in case you are lucky to find it.
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Corliss Engine
The unveiling of the Corliss engine in 1876 was the equivalent to the release of the iPad in 2010. The Corliss engine was not just a demonstration piece: through a system of shafts and underground tunnels, it directly powered 800 machines throughout the Centennial Exposition. The Centennial engine towered 45 feet in the air and boasted a flywheel 30 feet in diameter. Its two cylinders, each nearly four feet in diameter, contained two rotating steam and two rotating exhaust valves. The pistons turned a crankshaft at 36 revolutions per minute, and the engine itself was rated at 1,400 horsepower.
THE_GREAT_CORLISS_ENGINE.jpg

THE_GREAT_CORLISS_ENGINE_1.jpg

Peculiar Fact
This might be London News, but the image description states:
  • Opening of the American Centennial Festival Exhibition: a street in Philadelphia.
Street+in+Philadelphia+on+the+Opening+of+the+American+Centennial+Exhibition+1876.jpg

I am not an expert but if those are electric wires (could be telegraph wires, I guess) on May 13, 1876 in Philadelphia... well, it could be somewhat interesting:
  • In 1881 the first electric arc lamps, predecessor to Edison’s incandescent light bulb, were installed on Chestnut Street, by Brush Electric Light Company. Brush Electric Light Company manufactured the most advanced form of electric light prior to Edison’s bulb. By 1881 numerous individuals sensed that considerable profits could be made from electric lighting, as well as from other applications of electricity. In 1882 two Philadelphia high school teachers, Edwin J. Houston and Elihu Thomson, established The Philadelphia Electric Lighting Company, a predecessor of General Electric Company, although it did not begin to do business until 1886.
Related links:
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KD: Well, the architecture is definitely not as impressive in its intricacy when compared to the 1893 Chicago Expo. Yet, building sizes are beyond impressive for 1876. Makes one wonder, why these elaborate warehouses were demolished. Would like to get some opinions on what you think about the next "Six Months Wonder" titled "Exposition was the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, and products of the Soil and Mine". The one they want us to think was named "United States Centennial 1776-1876."

Please share your own findings pertaining to this specific Expo, in case you choose to explore any further.
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1912 Fire Brigade
36 Year Later

I gotta be missing something in between 1876 monorails and 1912 horses.​
 

VonKitty

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These expos/fairs are one of my favorite topics. The buildings were so huge and elaborate, and then to just demolish them is beyond comprehension.
Wishing I had more time to research this today, but I have found this site so far that has a great collection of advertisements, photos, etc. from the expo:

Digital Collections: United States Centennial Exhibition Collection

There are 81 pages (over 1600 images) and I’ve only had the time to look at about 16 pages. Something I did note were views from the observatory.


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There are several of these images (starting on p 9) and none of them seem to have any people in them - very strange.

And then (starting on p 10) there are construction photos, either without workers present

Memorial Hall/Art Gallery
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or with men posing for the camera

Machinery Hall
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There’s also what could be some insightful reading on this site, “Something for the Children: Uncle John’s Centennial Story”. There’s pages of it beginning on p 16, but they are not in order and I’m not sure every page is here. I’ve also included a sample page below.

Digital Collections: United States Centennial Exhibition Collection

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Fascinating subject. Can’t wait to see what everyone else discovers!
 

VonKitty

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Supposedly these are glass vials containing soil samples from Iowa, with the county names displayed on the balls. I haven’t been able to find an actual photograph of it, and I can’t read what it says at the bottom.
 

whitewave

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Interesting Fact:
  • Expo Duration - 184 days
  • 1876 US Population - 45,166,214
  • 1876 Expo Visitors - 10,000,000. Some visited more than once.
  • Visited by: 22% of the US Population (approximation, obviously was visited by foreigners as well)
  • Average Daily Visitors - 54,347 visitors
  • Whoever wants to play with 1880 US Census, be my guest. For example, 6.9 mil were under the age of 5.
In perspective:
I do understand that today's Theme Parks get visited from all over the World. Allegedly in 2019 we can travel easier and faster vs 1876. From this point of view our 1876 Expo is at a disadvantage as far as the ease of attending the event goes. In other words, for our 2019 Theme Parks, it is much easier to solicit and welcome visitors. It is also (imo) safe to assume that US theme parks get visited by vast numbers of foreign tourists. It was hardly as easy for the foreigners to visit the 1876 Expo in Philly.
What occurs to me when I read statistics like these is that we're being lied to about the population of the time. Maybe the statistics and demographic information is being/has been skewed to reflect a lesser population that thrived and burgeoned to today's numbers when the reality may be that the population was as numerous as today's but there was some huge die off that we're supposed to forget. Probably most people of the time had no idea of the number of our global population and so would accept any number they were told from an official source. (Much like we do today.)

We're pretty much a global civilization (with a lot of infighting), and information (of questionable reliability) is instantaneous and fairly comprehensive so we're certain we have the truth of any matter because "so many sources tell us so". Frankly, that's about all you can really do but if false histories are persistently and consistently pervasive, which information should we trust?

Reasonable people can't be expected to believe that a majority of the population had the skills to build those structures 11 years after the Civil War in which so many people died. Men who died in the war would not even have had time to train their sons in any craft. Traveling by buggy took roughly 1 day to travel 25 miles. America is a big country. How many of those remaining able-bodied men would travel weeks to go build those structures when they're still trying to put their lives back together after the Civil War?

Many times on this site (and others) it has been demonstrated that the official story is patently ludicrous so if the statistics quoted above are the official truth of the matter then I have to say that the information is incorrect. It's neither possible or probable that 1876 (post war) population numbers could or would spend those sums of money to build those structures, nor would the manpower be available.

Did something catastrophic happen between 1812 and 1865 (one generation) that caused multitudes of people to die off and a new generation be raised with a different story of what happened?

I tend to believe that the 1876 numbers are falsified rather than today's numbers because there are still many of us in living memory who have personally witnessed the increase in population numbers.

Since the official statistics quoted above are patently ludicrous we have to figure out which, if any, part of the official story is fabricated: the population numbers of 1876?, the time it took to build the structures?, were the structures already there? Personally, I think most of these exhibit structures were already there and the time it supposedly took to build them is actually how long it took to restore them to some semblance of their previous glory (and wire the places for electricity). Even a restoration of that magnitude would take an improbable number of skilled laborers for the resources we're told were available in 1876.
 

Red Bird

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1559522051406.jpeg
This building looks like my home town post office, now Carnegie library. I have been meaning to do a little post on my Findings which are not big news, just fit in with the general weirdness of that age plus feeling like it should really incorporate Carnegie himself and holdings, then I go down even MORE rabbit holes.
This is it, currently.
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What I get from all these exhibitions is the impression of definite ‘herding’ done differently now, except for this ongoing stuff (when they get a chance) which is similar:

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St. Petersburg new dept of agriculture. Is it temporary?
 
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studytruth

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Almost finished with a book on these Expositions. At first I thought it would be a simple process, it has turned out to be anything but simple. They are really really strange.

As for Philadelphia if you go to the link mentioned above for the Philadelphia library, they have a lot of very good construction photos, in fact probably the best I have seen from any fair for depicting wooden temporary structures. of course they show a few like Memorial Hall in the standard base all complete and them just building or redoing a dome.

Wanted to pass this on, found in my research a panorama of Philadelphia in 1876. The fair is to the left of the image, but look at Philadelphia. I think it looks very much like Florence, with the bridges, the domes and towers. The scale of some buildings in the city is amazing. Also note that on the hill above the fair is what looks like a Tesla Tower. Powering the fair?
Not sure how to imbed an image to the text, but the panorama can be found at the below web address: Link.
 

HulkSmash

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KD, yet another stunning thread! My mind is still unsure whether the creators of these expos actually threw up these buildings real fast with all the fake style, facades, or if these buildings were there beforehand. I suppose it possible now to create the facade style of buildings, but why? Every answer to the why to me, seems disingenuous, like its also a facade of a story. The creators are definitely hiding something. Maybe its just hiding the ability to actually create the buildings so no one would look any deeper into the story. I think that's most likely it, they were trying to fake people out by actually creating fake buildings. However, they had to have plans and its my opinion they stole those plans from buildings that were already there at some point. Think about it. USA has always utilized perception to fake people out. We still do it today. Our money itself is based on this false perception. To do something this extravagant, and this one is crazy extravagant, right on the heels of the Civil War seems so god-awful wasteful, that there must be another hidden purpose. And that purpose is VERY important to the creators. And I suspect its in regards to our stolen history, our true past. Plus, I also think these creators are trying to take credit for the knowledge of how to do all this beautiful architecture themselves, so we think them as cool and elite. What if these elite families in America were really just lucky opportunists, who survived the cataclysm, laid claim to large tracts of real estate because no one else was really there to dispute? What if these supposed crazy hard working, industrialist peckerheads were really just opportunistic frauds themselves and the only real thing they did was create a new historical narrative for the rest to buy?
 

VonKitty

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Just looked up the background of the main architect, Hermann Schwarzmann, and could find very little info on him. He graduated from the Royal Military Academy in Munich and was a lieutenant in the Bavarian Army. He emigrated to the US in 1868, and began working for Fairmount Park Commission in 1869 at 22 years of age. He had no prior architectural experience, yet he was capable of all this:

Schwarzmann immigrated to America from Germany at the age of 22 and found work as a designing engineer at Fairmount Park, becoming responsible for planning, ornamentation, drainage, and planting in the park. To prepare for his work on the Centennial Exhibition, Schwarzmann visited the Vienna International Exhibition in 1873 to study the buildings and the layout of the grounds.

Hermann Schwarzmann, 1876, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Historical Register of the Centennial Exposition 1876.
Hermann Schwarzmann, 1876, from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Historical Register of the Centennial Exposition 1876.

Upon his return to Philadelphia, he supervised workers as they moved 500,000 cubic yards of earth, graded and surfaced three miles of avenues and 17 miles of walks, built a railroad with 5.5 miles of double track, erected 16 bridges, and put up three miles of fence with 179 stiles and gates. Seven miles of drains, nine miles of water pipes, and 16 fountains and water works with daily pumping capacity of six million gallons were constructed, along with eight miles of gas pipes and three separate telegraph systems with underground cables. The landscaped grounds featured 153 acres of new lawns and flower beds and over 20,000 trees and shrubs.


Although trained as an engineer, not an architect, Schwarzmann designed 34 of the 249 large and small structures for the exhibition grounds, including the only two permanent structures: Memorial Hall and Horticultural Hall (destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954).”

After the exposition Schwarzmann attempted a private architectural practice in Philadelphia without any success - strange considering his fantastical feats - and he then moved to NYC where he worked as an architect and his firm designed the New York Mercantile Exchange in 1882.

And here’s something else I found of interest:


As "Chief Engineer of the Exhibition Grounds and Architect Permanent Buildings and Other Structures of the Centennial of Finance," Hermann Schwarzmann played a significant role designing the fair and its buildings, building thirty-four structures including Horticultural Hall, the Women's, Judge's, German, and Portuguese Pavilions, and the $1.5 million Memorial Hall. Schwarzmann's means of obtaining his commissions resembled his shrewd earlier tactics at Fairmount Park. For example, in 1873 the U.S. Centennial Commission had sponsored a competition for Memorial Hall, a permanent building designed to permanently house the city's art collection. The winners, Collins and Autenrieth, were chosen from forty-three architects. While the Committee debated the plans, Schwarzmann, not a competition participant, prepared his own designs and somehow managed to win the commission.

Schwarzmann based his design for Memorial Hall on Nicholas Felix Escalier's project for the Prix de Rome published in Croquis d'Architecture in 1867-69. Constructed of granite, brick, glass and iron, Memorial Hall consisted of a central domed area surrounded by four pavilions on the corners with open arcades east and west of the main entrance.


So despite his not even being a competitor, his design is chosen. Is that because the buildings were already there and they didn’t want the trouble of building one of the competitors’s designs?

Also, part of the purpose of the expo was to showcase all of America’s success and show it off to the world. So why would you want all of your buildings representative of architecture found in Europe? Why not come up with something new and original?
 

Mifletz

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Either:

1. The buildings were already there & were much older than we're being told.

2. There were very many thousands of highly skilled, very strong and big men working on it non-stop, without power tools. Modern architects have claimed that even with today's bulldozers, JCBs and trucks, it would take 20 years just to prepare the landscape for the 1876 and 1893 exhibitions, let alone the buildings!

3. Assistance from Angelic/Demonic/Magical/Supernatural/Some unknown technique-power was involved. Jewish tradition has it that although the first time the complicated Tabernacle in the Wilderness was erected it was nominally done by a 15' tall Moses by himself alone, its perfectly precise components actually pulled themselves together and were assembled by Divine help. And that Ezekiel 40-48's future intricate Third Temple will descend on to the Temple Mount from Heaven ready made!

Are there any other possibilities as to how these scores of perfect, complex large buildings on perfect landscaped terrain were built in a mere 2 years?!

From where did all the materals come from, hauled on to location without trucks, cement mixers, a nearby railhead etc. The logistics involved!

Was the construction of each building done ad hoc on the fly, or did each one have an architect with drawn up detailed plans to which the foreman and his men worked, correct to 1/16"!

And by what means were they demolished, and how and to where were the countless thousands of tons disposed?
 

BrokenAgate

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View attachment 22661

Supposedly these are glass vials containing soil samples from Iowa, with the county names displayed on the balls. I haven’t been able to find an actual photograph of it, and I can’t read what it says at the bottom.
Why would they put the glass balls up so high that nobody can see them? And really, did anyone care about viewing soil samples from anywhere, much less Iowa?
Assistance from Angelic/Demonic/Magical/Supernatural/Some unknown technique-power was involved. Jewish tradition has it that although the first time the complicated Tabernacle in the Wilderness was erected it was nominally done by a 15' tall Moses by himself alone, its perfectly precise components actually pulled themselves together and were assembled by Divine help.
This brings to mind the many myths of giant blocks of stone walking or flying into place...because someone was levitating them, perhaps? I believe that humans had phenomenal mental powers in the past, and that we have lost them in the Kali Yuga. A few individuals still have them, but nowhere near like they were centuries ago. It may be that all of us have these powers, but they are dormant or hidden and most people can't access them. We think in terms of technology because that's all we understand, due to our lack of spiritual development; but what if many of the buildings, pyramids, temples, etc. were not sculpted, carved, lasered, or 3D molded, but shaped by psychic abilities?
 

whitewave

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I believe that humans had phenomenal mental powers in the past, and that we have lost them in the Kali Yuga. A few individuals still have them, but nowhere near like they were centuries ago. It may be that all of us have these powers, but they are dormant or hidden and most people can't access them. We think in terms of technology because that's all we understand, due to our lack of spiritual development; but what if many of the buildings, pyramids, temples, etc. were not sculpted, carved, lasered, or 3D molded, but shaped by psychic abilities?
There's a book by Watchman Nee entitled The Latent Power of the Soul that expounds on this very subject. Small book-can be read in an hour or so. May be online but I haven't looked.
 

Timeshifter

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I know its been stated before but... What about...

The foundations (quality of the land) for a massive build?
Materials, where did they all come from?
Water supply...(drinking and services)
Power supply.. (fuels?)
Waste disposal (human, animal, food etc)
Food... for humans and animals

Imagine this just for the workers... then factor in the visitors, working animals, transport, logistics...

How did all these visitors get there? Air, see? Land bridge, magic....?

Have you ever looked at how much it takes to run a cruise ship per day...

15,000 meals per day

The scale of these things is beyond reason. Either everyone was clinically insane, or there is simple explanation for them

A. They were already there and possibly redressed
B. The world is 1,000,000% different in make up since their origins
C. Missunderstanding of histrories due to glitch in the reality we inhabbit.

My guess, A, B and C...

:unsure:
 

trismegistus

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Just looked up the background of the main architect, Hermann Schwarzmann, and could find very little info on him. He graduated from the Royal Military Academy in Munich and was a lieutenant in the Bavarian Army. He emigrated to the US in 1868, and began working for Fairmount Park Commission in 1869 at 22 years of age. He had no prior architectural experience, yet he was capable of all this:

Schwarzmann immigrated to America from Germany at the age of 22 and found work as a designing engineer at Fairmount Park, becoming responsible for planning, ornamentation, drainage, and planting in the park. To prepare for his work on the Centennial Exhibition, Schwarzmann visited the Vienna International Exhibition in 1873 to study the buildings and the layout of the grounds.

Hermann Schwarzmann, 1876, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Historical Register of the Centennial Exposition 1876.'s Illustrated Historical Register of the Centennial Exposition 1876.
Hermann Schwarzmann, 1876, from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Historical Register of the Centennial Exposition 1876.

Upon his return to Philadelphia, he supervised workers as they moved 500,000 cubic yards of earth, graded and surfaced three miles of avenues and 17 miles of walks, built a railroad with 5.5 miles of double track, erected 16 bridges, and put up three miles of fence with 179 stiles and gates. Seven miles of drains, nine miles of water pipes, and 16 fountains and water works with daily pumping capacity of six million gallons were constructed, along with eight miles of gas pipes and three separate telegraph systems with underground cables. The landscaped grounds featured 153 acres of new lawns and flower beds and over 20,000 trees and shrubs.

Although trained as an engineer, not an architect, Schwarzmann designed 34 of the 249 large and small structures for the exhibition grounds, including the only two permanent structures: Memorial Hall and Horticultural Hall (destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954).”


After the exposition Schwarzmann attempted a private architectural practice in Philadelphia without any success - strange considering his fantastical feats - and he then moved to NYC where he worked as an architect and his firm designed the New York Mercantile Exchange in 1882.

And here’s something else I found of interest:


As "Chief Engineer of the Exhibition Grounds and Architect Permanent Buildings and Other Structures of the Centennial of Finance," Hermann Schwarzmann played a significant role designing the fair and its buildings, building thirty-four structures including Horticultural Hall, the Women's, Judge's, German, and Portuguese Pavilions, and the $1.5 million Memorial Hall. Schwarzmann's means of obtaining his commissions resembled his shrewd earlier tactics at Fairmount Park. For example, in 1873 the U.S. Centennial Commission had sponsored a competition for Memorial Hall, a permanent building designed to permanently house the city's art collection. The winners, Collins and Autenrieth, were chosen from forty-three architects. While the Committee debated the plans, Schwarzmann, not a competition participant, prepared his own designs and somehow managed to win the commission.

Schwarzmann based his design for Memorial Hall on Nicholas Felix Escalier's project for the Prix de Rome published in Croquis d'Architecture in 1867-69. Constructed of granite, brick, glass and iron, Memorial Hall consisted of a central domed area surrounded by four pavilions on the corners with open arcades east and west of the main entrance.


So despite his not even being a competitor, his design is chosen. Is that because the buildings were already there and they didn’t want the trouble of building one of the competitors’s designs?

Also, part of the purpose of the expo was to showcase all of America’s success and show it off to the world. So why would you want all of your buildings representative of architecture found in Europe? Why not come up with something new and original?
You're hitting on the true gold here, once you start digging into the architects is where these narratives start falling apart.

Generally speaking, most of these "architects" for the expos had little to no former experience in actual architecture yet got commissioned to create these insane works of art. Moreover, the information available about them is sparse at best. For this particular guy I wasn't able to find much of any primary sources for his existence, save for an obituary. His father is supposed to be a well known fresco artist, yet I was able to find absolutely nothing on him.

And not that it is necessarily indicative of anything, but the fact that there is only one image of him is also curious - - I would think one of the key architects of an expo would have at least had a photo taken or something. Without good sourced information, that illustration could have been of anyone.

In my opinion, I think most of these expo architects were fronts. If they did exist, they did not design these buildings but merely oversaw their renovations. Many of these architects were freemasons, if that matters.

I think these architects could be the key to understanding this mess.
 

VonKitty

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I think these architects could be the key to understanding this mess.
I so agree. Whose idea was it to have these fairs in the first place? I’ve tried researching into the planning commissions and such for the fairs, but I haven’t had much luck, nor much time to do so. I was wondering, are they primarily masons? maybe some other secret society group? If we could get to the very origin then maybe we could piece some things together.
 

whitewave

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the fact that there is only one image of him is also curious - - I would think one of the key architects of an expo would have at least had a photo taken or something. Without good sourced information, that illustration could have been of anyone.
The Comstock Act (1800's) destroyed over 4 million photographs so I'm surprised we have any pictures of anything before that bit of history- destroying went on. Considering when photography was supposedly invented, the Comstock catastrophe would have destroyed almost every picture ever made in America.
 

VonKitty

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Looking into the hotels a bit further:

The Fair Commission published notices of adequate rooms in Philadelphia, including 150,000 in hotels, 20,000 from the Centennial Lodging-House Agency, 40,000 of accomodations with relatives and friends, 13,000 in boarding-houses, 5,000 for patrons of husbandry (Grangers), 5,000 at Camp Scott for military organizations, 5,000 camp in Fairmount Park for military, and 20,000 in suburban hotels. Hotel prices ranged from $1.50 to $5.00 per day, boarding houses $1 to 2.50, Centennial Lodging Agency $1.25 per day, including meals $2.50.

Eight hotels were built near the exhibition. Grand Exposition Hotel, located at the corner of Girard and Lancaster Avenues, was advertised as the largest hotel in world. It was made of brick with 1,325 rooms and a capacity of 3,500. The United States Hotel, 42nd & Columbia, charged $4 per day. Atlas Hotel, 48th to 52nd St., contained 1,500 rooms, housing 3,000 people. Globe Hotel was located at Elm and Belmont Avenue, had five stories, and fed 30,000 people a day. The Transcontinental Hotel stood opposite the main entrance to the exposition with 500 rooms. There were a number of small hotels near 51st and Elm Ave., including the Elm Avenue Hotel, Metropolitan, the International and Congress Hall, housing 200 to 800 guests each. Philadelphia Centennial International Exposition 1876

Being the largest hotel in the world, I was sure I could find a photo, advertisement, something of the Grand Exposition Hotel, but no. The only thing I found related to this hotel was a shitty drawing

0B40C332-70B4-4165-B96A-CBA2F06ABA59.jpeg


Then I searched for the United States Hotel, and all I find is an advertisement
23203


Atlas Hotel, nothing found.

Elm Avenue Hotel, nothing found.

The Globe Hotel, actually had some luck with this one.
3B63BB8B-768A-48B8-B859-7512442FFECB.jpeg

View looking north on Belmont Avenue showing one of the two temporary hotels built to accommodate visitors to the Centennial Exhibition of 1876. The hotel, operated by John A. Rice and situated opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained 1000 rooms to house 3,000 to 5,000 guests for $5 a day. Street lamps and telegraph poles line the sidewalk.

Globe Hotel. Cenntenial grounds. [graphic]

And a plan of the hotel, somewhat
Globe Hotel

Trans-Continental Hotel, only one photo
23202

The Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, held in 1876 at Fairmount Park, further spurred the construction of hotels to accommodate large groups of visitors. Six hotels were built at or near the Centennial Grounds: Grand Exposition Hotel, Trans-Continental, United States, Atlas Hotel, Elm Avenue Hotel, and the Globe. The Globe, constructed opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained one thousand rooms to house three to five thousand guests for five dollars a day, up to two dollars more than comparative alternatives. All hotels built for the exposition were demolished soon after its conclusion, except for the United States Hotel, which survived until the 1970s on the west side of Forty-Second Street.
Hotels and Motels | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia


So, here we have again: huge temporary buildings, demolished soon after; a serious lack of photos; and a million questions of how they could have possibly pulled this off.
 

JWW427

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Quick thoughts:

• Mass mind programming as per usual. Just business, folks. Come again. And Again. Have a foot-long cee-gar.
• The building techniques may have been highly advanced but still used wood, glass, iron, and bricks, thus these expos were practice runs. I understand the US military uses basic antigravity cargo palettes for base construction. Five inch lift. Multi-ton use. That's not actually classified if you know where to dig.
• Serious commerce for Philly businesses and hotels. $$$ Money talks, bullshit sprints the quarter.
• Build half, cover up half. The old 50/50. Nothing to see here but soil and animal stool samples.
• Feed the masses. Did they drug the food? GMOs introduced? All that beer? Was it a fluoride test run? It has to be asked.
• The Art Museum was already there for sure in my book. Nice try, that.
• The big buildings would be impossible to heat and cool effectively. Limited use? Or...are we missing something? Hmm...
• Steam engines and coal. Nothing else is acceptable technology. You savvy?
• Bigger is better. The American way. Dig it.
• Nothing Tartary-minded to marvel at in Philly proper. Move along to the expo!

philly clock tower.jpegphilly city hall.jpeg

JWW
 

Recognition

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Looking into the hotels a bit further:

The Fair Commission published notices of adequate rooms in Philadelphia, including 150,000 in hotels, 20,000 from the Centennial Lodging-House Agency, 40,000 of accomodations with relatives and friends, 13,000 in boarding-houses, 5,000 for patrons of husbandry (Grangers), 5,000 at Camp Scott for military organizations, 5,000 camp in Fairmount Park for military, and 20,000 in suburban hotels. Hotel prices ranged from $1.50 to $5.00 per day, boarding houses $1 to 2.50, Centennial Lodging Agency $1.25 per day, including meals $2.50.

Eight hotels were built near the exhibition. Grand Exposition Hotel, located at the corner of Girard and Lancaster Avenues, was advertised as the largest hotel in world. It was made of brick with 1,325 rooms and a capacity of 3,500. The United States Hotel, 42nd & Columbia, charged $4 per day. Atlas Hotel, 48th to 52nd St., contained 1,500 rooms, housing 3,000 people. Globe Hotel was located at Elm and Belmont Avenue, had five stories, and fed 30,000 people a day. The Transcontinental Hotel stood opposite the main entrance to the exposition with 500 rooms. There were a number of small hotels near 51st and Elm Ave., including the Elm Avenue Hotel, Metropolitan, the International and Congress Hall, housing 200 to 800 guests each.
Philadelphia Centennial International Exposition 1876


Being the largest hotel in the world, I was sure I could find a photo, advertisement, something of the Grand Exposition Hotel, but no. The only thing I found related to this hotel was a shitty drawing

View attachment 23196

Then I searched for the United States Hotel, and all I find is an advertisement
View attachment 23203


Atlas Hotel, nothing found.

Elm Avenue Hotel, nothing found.

The Globe Hotel, actually had some luck with this one.
View attachment 23199

View looking north on Belmont Avenue showing one of the two temporary hotels built to accommodate visitors to the Centennial Exhibition of 1876. The hotel, operated by John A. Rice and situated opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained 1000 rooms to house 3,000 to 5,000 guests for $5 a day. Street lamps and telegraph poles line the sidewalk.

Globe Hotel. Cenntenial grounds. [graphic]

And a plan of the hotel, somewhat
Globe Hotel

Trans-Continental Hotel, only one photo
View attachment 23202

The Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, held in 1876 at Fairmount Park, further spurred the construction of hotels to accommodate large groups of visitors. Six hotels were built at or near the Centennial Grounds: Grand Exposition Hotel, Trans-Continental, United States, Atlas Hotel, Elm Avenue Hotel, and the Globe. The Globe, constructed opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained one thousand rooms to house three to five thousand guests for five dollars a day, up to two dollars more than comparative alternatives. All hotels built for the exposition were demolished soon after its conclusion, except for the United States Hotel, which survived until the 1970s on the west side of Forty-Second Street.
Hotels and Motels | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia


So, here we have again: huge temporary buildings, demolished soon after; a serious lack of photos; and a million questions of how they could have possibly pulled this off.
Looking into the hotels a bit further:

The Fair Commission published notices of adequate rooms in Philadelphia, including 150,000 in hotels, 20,000 from the Centennial Lodging-House Agency, 40,000 of accomodations with relatives and friends, 13,000 in boarding-houses, 5,000 for patrons of husbandry (Grangers), 5,000 at Camp Scott for military organizations, 5,000 camp in Fairmount Park for military, and 20,000 in suburban hotels. Hotel prices ranged from $1.50 to $5.00 per day, boarding houses $1 to 2.50, Centennial Lodging Agency $1.25 per day, including meals $2.50.

Eight hotels were built near the exhibition. Grand Exposition Hotel, located at the corner of Girard and Lancaster Avenues, was advertised as the largest hotel in world. It was made of brick with 1,325 rooms and a capacity of 3,500. The United States Hotel, 42nd & Columbia, charged $4 per day. Atlas Hotel, 48th to 52nd St., contained 1,500 rooms, housing 3,000 people. Globe Hotel was located at Elm and Belmont Avenue, had five stories, and fed 30,000 people a day. The Transcontinental Hotel stood opposite the main entrance to the exposition with 500 rooms. There were a number of small hotels near 51st and Elm Ave., including the Elm Avenue Hotel, Metropolitan, the International and Congress Hall, housing 200 to 800 guests each.
Philadelphia Centennial International Exposition 1876


Being the largest hotel in the world, I was sure I could find a photo, advertisement, something of the Grand Exposition Hotel, but no. The only thing I found related to this hotel was a shitty drawing

View attachment 23196

Then I searched for the United States Hotel, and all I find is an advertisement
View attachment 23203


Atlas Hotel, nothing found.

Elm Avenue Hotel, nothing found.

The Globe Hotel, actually had some luck with this one.
View attachment 23199

View looking north on Belmont Avenue showing one of the two temporary hotels built to accommodate visitors to the Centennial Exhibition of 1876. The hotel, operated by John A. Rice and situated opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained 1000 rooms to house 3,000 to 5,000 guests for $5 a day. Street lamps and telegraph poles line the sidewalk.
And a plan of the hotel, somewhat
Trans-Continental Hotel, only one photo
View attachment 23202

The Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, held in 1876 at Fairmount Park, further spurred the construction of hotels to accommodate large groups of visitors. Six hotels were built at or near the Centennial Grounds: Grand Exposition Hotel, Trans-Continental, United States, Atlas Hotel, Elm Avenue Hotel, and the Globe. The Globe, constructed opposite the entrance to the grounds, contained one thousand rooms to house three to five thousand guests for five dollars a day, up to two dollars more than comparative alternatives. All hotels built for the exposition were demolished soon after its conclusion, except for the United States Hotel, which survived until the 1970s on the west side of Forty-Second Street.

So, here we have again: huge temporary buildings, demolished soon after; a serious lack of photos; and a million questions of how they could have possibly pulled this off.
1000 rooms?! I don't buy it! God they must think we'll believe anything! Awesome post!!
 
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