1870: Vehicles on the Streets of Tokyo by Utagawa Yoshitora

KorbenDallas

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Utagawa Yoshitora was a designer of ukiyo-e Japanese woodblock prints and an illustrator of books and newspapers who was active from about 1850 to about 1880. He was born in Edo (modern Tokyo), but neither his date of birth nor date of death is known. He was the oldest pupil of Utagawa Kuniyoshi who excelled in prints of warriors, kabuki actors, beautiful women, and foreigners. He may not have seen any of the foreign scenes he depicted.
1870
steam_car.jpg


1870
boats.jpg


Vehicles on the Streets of Tokyo-1870_1.jpg

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Vehicles on the Streets of Tokyo 1870.jpg

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KD: We don't know when this Utagawa Yoshitora was born. We don't know when he died. Yet, we know the dates of his creations.
  • This particular artist, being Japanese, was not a bi supporter of the flag of Japan. Or so it seems, for I have seen may be one or two resemblances.
  • And, of course, them steam cars, and self propelled boats (with no obvious smoke stacks) were normal for the 18-whatever Japan. Industrial Revolution spared no one.
 

Dielectric

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Really interesting KB. I found this altered reprint of a Yoshitora print and the authors story behind it here. September 2014 – Tokyo Jinja
So the top print, which is 1 of 3 that make a complete set, is the forgery being listed at an art gallery in Japan, while the lower is evidently the original. Evidently unknown to the Art Gallery, which BTW seems a little doubtful given the fame of the artist himself. So possibly altering history for profit? Alternatively, the first Pacific Ocean crossing via balloons from Japan.

photo2-1024x767.jpg
Yoshitoa-Trial-Balloon-Launch-at-the-Naval-Academy.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

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So? What did you spot? Did you notice how all the flags on the balloons were changed from Japanese flags to American flags? According to Wikipedia, the Japanese officially decreed the Nisshōki or Hinomaru (sun flag) as the national emblem in 1870, although it was already accepted as the de facto flag of Japan.
A fun article it is. Explains the flag thingy.
 

inquisitor

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What has caught my eye is the "civil standard" with the white canton and blue stars flying on dry land, while the "military standard" with the blue canton and white stars is flying on the 'bow' of the balloon. A depiction as recent as 1870! Is it just a one-off? I can't think of any instance beyond the Civil War in the 1850s, where we would have had the blue-on-white flag changed out for the white-on-blue flag. I know the "civil standard" has been shown elsewhere on this forum. It's really intriguing.
 

Dielectric

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Another psuedo charactor with many works attributed?
I have had to question more base assumptions in the short time I've been here and it's because of comments like this one. I know it's stupid, but even looking at the various prints online I still didn't question if this artist was even real. I don't know why but I just didn't. Crazy huh? What a great little low risk scam this is; create a psuedo characte, build up a supposed history of who they were, and just look at the resources you can have to do that with.

Oh yea, and of course what grabbed my attention was the alteration to the flags wherein Wikipedia claims he opposed the type shown, so again a direct conflict in the supposed artist's ideology.
 
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KorbenDallas

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I have had to question more base assumptions in the short time I've been here and it's because of comments like this one. I know it's stupid, but even looking at the various prints online I still didn't question if this artist was even real. I don't know why but I just didn't. Crazy huh? What a great little low risk scam this is; create a psuedo characte, build up a supposed history of who they were, and just look at the resources you can have to do that with.
Have you seen how many engravings are attributed to Piranesi, and the complexity of each? Is it physically possible to accomplish this in a life time? Should we accept his (or his son's) authorship as a fact, or look for a more reasonable explanation?
 

Dielectric

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Have you seen how many engravings are attributed to Piranesi, and the complexity of each? Is it physically possible to accomplish this in a life time? Should we accept his (or his son's) authorship as a fact, or look for a more reasonable explanation?
I did KD, I called up google images and searched that way, and that's how I ran into the article because it featured the round red rising sun which supposedly he was ideologically opposed to, or at least that was my understanding. It was unclear which of the Japanese flags he opposed. At any rate that's what caught my attention in the first place.

So which flag did he oppose? The Sun burst flag of the Army and Navy, or the round rising sun? The reason being that there may be a connection to an on-going narrative here involving nationalism. Japan more recently legalized the Sunburst flag which had been outlawed after WWII. Sort of funny no American Media even noticed, yet again if the Germans had suddenly raised the Swastika all hell would have broken lose don't ya think?
 
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KorbenDallas

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This does not really answer the question I asked. @Timeshifter referred to the volume of work attributed to one person. He did not question the existence of the art but rather the associated assigned authorship. And rightfully so, for TPTB gave us the guy who was born at some point, and died at some point. If this is not suspicious, I don't know what is. Could there be a plausible explanation for the artist of this magnitude to be missing his dates of birth, and death? I doubt.

As far as flags go, I do not know. Why do we have this?
 

Dielectric

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Back to the car issue, that drawing does not resemble any steam driven vehicle I can locate, and you would think that any form of horseless vehicle
would have created news in that epoch of time because of the novelty and because of the immense cost associated with any such machine.

People today don't realize what it took to make any kind of machine at the turn of the last century. Even up to the 1960's most cars were largely hand made. All vehicles all being made by skilled hands with decades of experience and training. Even up into the 1960's Japanese manufacturing was still building cars and trucks in factories with dirt floors. So primitive it boggles the mind by our standards of today.
The reckoning : Halberstam, David : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

When you look at any machine which existed before not too long ago, well into the 1970's or even 1980's, you have to realize that every part produced to build it came directly from the hands of another human being. Robotics didn't exist, not really, all that existed was a so called manufacturing engineering, which basically is about how to design an assembly line as efficiently as possible. There were machines which were single purpose machines that somewhat automated manufacturing but even so all of these were supervised or directly controlled by human beings and that is still a large portion of many types of manufacturing.

Now this is an Avery Steam Tractor for farming. Unknown vintage but Avery went under in the Great Depression according to the official version
of reality. It was probably built around the turn of the last century. Avery tractors are very rare and the history behind this machine does itself cause one to question because here is an surviving example, and then there's the drawing of the factory below, and yet again these are considered very rare machines.
Avery Company - Wikipedia

Avery Steam Tractor.jpg

AveryCompanyLetterhead.jpg

"By 1891 the company had located to Peoria, Illinois, and begun building stream tractors. Avery first entered the tractor market with the Farm & City in 1909, which looked more like a truck. "
TractorData.com - Avery farm tractors sorted by factory

The scale of the manufacturing facility shown in the illustration does not jibe with the data as far as I can tell. Now I did locate this image of the same tractor model, but equipped with a novel shovel, actually known as a drag line shovel which is quite interesting.
Avery Mfg. Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org

Avery Steam Tractor with Shovel.jpg

So now after all this you take another look at the Yoshitora block print and ask how real could that be? We know the Avery is real, though even there the question arises as to the scale of operation, and so with this block print wouldn't you think there would be more on this machine somewhere's? I mean if it existed then it is highly unlikely that this would be the only surviving image. Every news paper had artists and reporters.

steam_car.jpg
 
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Dielectric

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This does not really answer the question I asked. @Timeshifter referred to the volume of work attributed to one person. He did not question the existence of the art but rather the associated assigned authorship. And rightfully so, for TPTB gave us the guy who was born at some point, and died at some point. If this is not suspicious, I don't know what is. Could there be a plausible explanation for the artist of this magnitude to be missing his dates of birth, and death? I doubt.

As far as flags go, I do not know. Why do we have this?
Well cutting a block print isn't like throwing a piece of pottery, otherwise I'd say sure, but these prints, especially some of the others are quite complex, and I don't know how prolific one person can be but some can be pretty prolific. Seems like the thing that stands out to me is to look for signatures which make the individuality of the art unique to a specific artist. Not sure that all the prints attributed to him came from him, provided he existed of course.

I think the volume is an issue. I think here is enough reason to question whether this person ever existed. I also think that buying a bunch of paper suitable for making prints and painting on, and then passed down through generations educated in exploitation techniques could become a novel self sustaining form of inheritance, creating or leading to the formation of an organized sub-culture specializing in various forms of forgeries.
 

Dielectric

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This is what happens when a handful of people hold half the planetary wealth: Games~
Yes, what do we really know. Those patents could have been planted, the photo looks real, it could even be real made from a remade machine, or mockup, so commonly used in theater it's just a part of so-called "stagecraft." So do a mock-up and then make an "Old Time" photograph.
According to our conventional time line they already had this stuff in 1820s.
It's just they choose to show us horse buggies everywhere up to about 1910-15s.
Well being a newbee I'm just stumbling around it seems. Let's continue over on the on the other thread then. I see what you're saying; that we are here, there's this dichotomy between the official narrative and various evidences such as roads which seem to have been created before the machines which supposedly used them.
Early 19th Century: Highway Steam Locomotives, Related Laws and Roads
 
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0harris0

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anyone on here able to translate Japanese?

there's a possible description next to the steam vehicle in OP
japanese.jpg


and also found this vehicle very odd:
japan trike.jpg

what is the method of propulsion?! :unsure: :unsure:
 
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