1840: Napoleon's Funeral Carriage

KorbenDallas

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Napoleon died (on the island of Saint Helena off the coast of Africa ) in 1821, most likely (lol, sure) of stomach cancer, and in 1840 his body was returned to Paris, where it was interred in the Hotel des Invalides.

With regard to the below thread, who, or what do you think was being transported inside the Napoleon's Funeral Carriage in 1840?

Napoleons-funeral-carriage-1840.jpg


Napoleon-funeral-Retour_des_Cendres_approaching-Invalides.jpg

Paris-arc_de_triomphe-Napoléon_1840.jpg


large-napoleon-bronze-60mm-1840.jpg

 

asatiger1966

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Napoleon died (on the island of Saint Helena off the coast of Africa ) in 1821, most likely (lol, sure) of stomach cancer, and in 1840 his body was returned to Paris, where it was interred in the Hotel des Invalides.

With regard to the below thread, who, or what do you think was being transported inside the Napoleon's Funeral Carriage in 1840?
I know nothing about the above, but that surly is not the procession of an ousted, beaten general?
That must have cost a fortune. Wow we live in a kaleidoscope.

I feel similar to the German Sargent "I know Nothing"
 

AnthroposRex

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On
Napoleon died (on the island of Saint Helena off the coast of Africa ) in 1821, most likely (lol, sure) of stomach cancer, and in 1840 his body was returned to Paris, where it was interred in the Hotel des Invalides.

With regard to the below thread, who, or what do you think was being transported inside the Napoleon's Funeral Carriage in 1840?
That coin at the bottom. It's hard to make out, but what I thought were "***" next to the "15 D" looks like "HRE". Was Napoleon a Holy Roman Emporer? Google says HRE ended in 1804 or 1806. Anyone have any more info on that?
 

Timeshifter

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Love this from https://shannonselin.com/2017/05/napoleons-body/

20 years after his burial...

'The cover of the third coffin having been removed, a tin ornament, slightly rusted, was seen, which was removed, and a white satin sheet was perceived, which was detached with the greatest precaution by the doctor, and Napoleon’s body was exposed to view. His features were so little changed that his face was recognized by those who had known him when alive. The different articles which had been deposited in the coffin were found exactly as they had been placed. The hands were singularly well preserved. The uniform, the orders, the hat, were very little changed. His entire person presented the appearance of one lately preserved. The body was not exposed to the external air longer than two minutes at most, which were necessary for the surgeon to take measures to prevent any alteration. (6)'

Wtf?

As to whats in the carriage? Something BIG!

And also, here we have another legendary funeral, 13 years into mainstream admission of photography, but no photos of the event....

This could be anything, anyone, anytime?
 

wizz33

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no way that so few horses pulled that weight, and those wheels look like later additions.
i think the carriage floated on some form of anti gravity.

and that tapestry in on the sides is very suspicious.
 

Timeshifter

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no way that so few horses pulled that weight, and those wheels look like later additions.
i think the carriage floated on some form of anti gravity.

and that tapestry in on the sides is very suspicious.
Mmm possibly. In this image below there is nothing linking the horses to the carriage

Napoleons-funeral-carriage-1840.jpg

And in the one below, the curtains fall to the ground covering any 'wheels'...

Napoleon-funeral-Retour_des_Cendres_approaching-Invalides.jpg
 

Timeshifter

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Arc de Triomphe


Height 50 metres (164ft)

That makes this thing what, 20 metres in height?

:cautious:
 

Timeshifter

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mmm, could be, did the French hold carnivals back then? Did anyone?

a side note, wtf are those things atop of the Arc? Which are no longer there? Considering the size of the arc (50m) they are not small.

Also, 1840. 13 years after the French supposedly invented Photography, and no photos?

Paris-arc_de_triomphe-Napoléon_1840.jpg


edit: Whilst looking for old photos of the Arc DT, could not find anything pre 1960. However,

Victor Hugo had a similar funeral, but his carriage was a little less grand

vintage-victor-hugos-funeral-1885-07.jpg


However, by the time we get to the Arc, we have this? and the Stuff on the roof is back....

vintage-victor-hugos-funeral-1885-03a.jpg


Symbolism? Scarifice?

:unsure:
 
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studytruth

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I had a thought on this today. What if we are getting a shot of "lost years" as we are talking about in these forums. Say perhaps this is 1840, but the 1840 of the proper timeline (before things got shifted around say in the 1860s or 70's). That Napoleon lived until 1840 as leader of France, died in that year, and then of course they would have some sort of massive burial service for him. After the reset and time change, his ouster was created in 1815 (perhaps with a fictional battle...that whole coming back to france story just reeks of bullshit).
The entire napoleonic wars might be made up- who knows France might have won them if there had been. But that makes more sense that having a lavish burial for a ruler who was deemed to be the 'enemy of the world'
There is some important message in this 1840 event. whatever 1840 it was.
 

jd755

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mmm, could be, did the French hold carnivals back then? Did anyone?

a side note, wtf are those things atop of the Arc? Which are no longer there? Considering the size of the arc (50m) they are not small.

Also, 1840. 13 years after the French supposedly invented Photography, and no photos?

View attachment 24142

edit: Whilst looking for old photos of the Arc DT, could not find anything pre 1960. However,

Victor Hugo had a similar funeral, but his carriage was a little less grand

View attachment 24143

However, by the time we get to the Arc, we have this? and the Stuff on the roof is back....

View attachment 24144

Symbolism? Scarifice?

:unsure:
Thought you said you were crap at searching.

Taking my lead from you.
In colour from here; Victor Hugo.
Funerailles-Hugo.jpg

Carnival again, it seems to me. The construction method not the parade.
From here; http://img.1.vacanceo.net/classic/171472.jpg
171472.jpg

Definitely carnival construction!
From here; Vintage: Victor Hugo’s Funeral (1885)
vintage-victor-hugos-funeral-1885-01-1024x789.jpg

vintage-victor-hugos-funeral-1885-06-1024x765.jpg
 

Recognition

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Let me preface this response by saying that i really appreciate the research involving carnivale, and definitely think we are seeing lighter immitations of the event we see in KDs pictures, in the photos/images of victor hugo's funeral. (My fave writer, btw.)

I have to disagree with the idea that the OP pictures are light parade installations that appear heavy, and here is why.

1. The marble statues on top

2. The whole look of the thing looks solid and ornate (to me)

3. Look at the place that his coffin now lies: gorgeous, and real as sh**.

Whatever is in that coffin, whatever this event was truly celebrating, whatever time period this occurred in i think the original drawings represent something massive, beautiful and extremely heavy. Later incarnations might not be using the same materials/technology, but the OP posts look a little different to me.

What i'm ultimately saying, is that the beauty/mystery/enormity of the architecture of the location of the 'grave' beckons toward something more massive/mysterious than parade 'floats' (interesting word;))

Les Invalides - Wikipedia
 
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