1818: Tartarian, or Hunting Indian

KorbenDallas

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The question remains, if Tartary had nothing to do with the continental Americas, than how did the names managed to bleed through?

Tartarian, or Hunting Indian, Inhabiting the Inland parts of North America.
  • Facial types of two different native Americans from Newfoundland and Labrador. Both wear fur clothing.
  • The second one can be seen here.
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Source
And a little bonus for those willing to read:
  • A Nation Now Extinct: American Indian Origin Theories as of 1820: Samuel L. Mitchill, Martin Harris, and the New York Theory
 

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AnotherLife

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I've been looking into the Tartarian Native American connection ever since BStankman shared this awesome find. Beginning at the second paragraph of page 39, the author gives a brief overview of the history of Tartary, mentioning that they may be of the Lost Tribes of Israel, which I've also heard attributed to the Native Americans (I haven't looked much into that yet, but these two YouTube videos go over some of the possible evidence). He goes on to list the many similarities between the Tartarian and Native peoples.
There also seems to be a connectionbetween the Tibetan Buddhists, who based on the maps would have been Tartarians, and the Native Americans.
 
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Violet_Durn

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I've been looking into the Tartarian Native American connection ever since BStankman shared this awesome find. Beginning at the second paragraph of page 39, the author gives a brief overview of the history of Tartary, mentioning that they may be of the Lost Tribes of Israel, which I've also heard attributed to the Native Americans (I haven't looked much into that yet, but these two YouTube videos go over some of the possible evidence). He goes on to list the many similarities between the Tartarian and Native peoples.
There also seems to be a connectionbetween the Tibetan Buddhists, who based on the maps would have been Tartarians, and the Native Americans.
Two migrations of people resulted in what we know now as Native Americans, one from the south and one from the north. These migrations are noted in Native folklore and can be traced with Native languages. I am Nunche (Ute), our language is a branch of Aztec our ancestors migrated from the south. I would be willing to bet money that the Anishinaabe language (northern Indigenous people in America) could be traced to the Tartarin language (if it exists).
 

NowhereMan

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The question remains, if Tartary had nothing to do with the continental Americas, than how did the names managed to bleed through?

Tartarian, or Hunting Indian, Inhabiting the Inland parts of North America.
Any chance there is a connection between the Tartarian Hunting Indians and the peoples of Cahokia?

EDIT: I think I found something in the poem The Rising Glory Of America by Hugh Henry Brackenridge (1748-1816)! References to tartars:

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This part even mentions they lived in an area that appear similar to the Mississippians and Cahokia:

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And to the Esquimaux (Eskimo?) Fishing Indians:

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Is there American Tartarian history stored in this lengthy poem? Could the Mississippians be Tartarians?

EDIT 2: Odd, now here is a webpage-copy of 'Poems Relating To The American Revolution' by Philip Freneau published in 1865 containing said poem, and the words are altered; for example 'Esquimaux' is removed:

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The book, however, contains two more references to Tartars in poems. From 'The Political Balance; Or, the Fates Of Britain and America Compared' beginning page 155:

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And in 'General Washington's Arrival in Philadelphia' beginning page 266:

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At this point I don't know which poem is correct so I am now looking for the earliest published reference(s) and will need to take some time to analyze the storyline. Update: Here's the book of poems on Archive.org. According to Wikipedia, Brackenridge read the poem as a commencement speech in 1771. I'm not sure if the web-copy version is the original, but if it is, it changed between 1771 and 1865.
 
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