1816: Lord Byron's "Darkness" reveals what: war, catastrophe or nothing?

KorbenDallas

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As you might have heard, the year of 1816 is known for being one of the coldest in our recent history. It is known under different names such as the Year Without a Summer, the Poverty Year, and Eighteen Hundred and Froze To Death. Severe climate abnormalities caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C (0.7–1.3 °F). Remember these numbers for we are going to need those later.

year-without-summer.jpeg

This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere. The Year Without a Summer was an agricultural disaster. The climatic aberrations of 1816 had the greatest effect on most of North America, Western Europe and Asia (China). (Notice how Russia is not included here)

I am not going to dive into the details. This 1816 was apparently cold enough to kill hundreds of thousands of people, destroy agriculture and distinguish itself in history by getting its own Wikipedia page. Below are a few links for your convenience. There are a lot of mind blowing details about the scale of the disaster.
In general, there was enough temperature related shenanigans between 16th and mid-19th centuries to justify the name they received: Little Ice Age.

Mount Tambora Volcanic Eruption
Of course, our scientists determined the cause of this drastic 1816 temperature change. The aberrations are now generally thought to have occurred because of the April 5–15, 1815, Mount Tambora volcanic eruption on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. The eruption had a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ranking of 7, a colossal event that ejected at least 100 km3 (24 cu mi) of material.

1815_tambora_explosion.png

The eruption column reached the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 43 kilometres (141,000 ft). The coarser ash particles settled out one to two weeks after the eruptions, but the finer ash particles stayed in the atmosphere from a few months to a few years at altitudes of 10–30 kilometres (33,000–98,000 ft). Longitudinal winds spread these fine particles around the globe, creating optical phenomena. Prolonged and brilliantly coloured sunsets and twilights were seen frequently in London between 28 June and 2 July 1815 and 3 September and 7 October 1815. The glow of the twilight sky typically appeared orange or red near the horizon and purple or pink above.

tambora_eruption.jpg


So, just where did this direct link between the year 1816 weather and Mount Tambora eruption come from. Here is what NASA has to say about this "direct link".

A century and a half later, American oceanographer Henry Stommel and his wife, Elizabeth, published an article in 1979's Scientific American entitled “The Year Without a Summer.” They suggested that the eruption had caused a severe summertime cold snap during 1816 that resulted in killer frosts in New England and Europe. Soaring food prices and famine followed the frosts, to the degree that 1816 was also nicknamed “Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death.”

Henry Stommel
Sep 27, 1920 – Jan 17, 1992
oceanographer Henry Stommel.jpg

The Stommels were revisiting an old controversy: can volcanic eruptions change the climate? The issue had first been taken up by scientists in 1901, when a pair of Swiss researchers proposed that the dust thrown up by a series of large volcanic eruptions could have caused the ice ages, by blocking out the Sun’s rays. However, they had no evidence to support their hypothesis. Despite the giant eruption of the island of Krakatau in Indonesia in 1883, and subsequent in-depth studies of the event, world temperature data hadn’t been collected.

The 1912 eruption of Mt. Katmai in Alaska motivated a number of others to probe the volcano-climate connection. Charles Greeley Abbott measured the sunlight reduction caused by Katmai’s eruption; William Jackson Humphreys, meanwhile, went back to the records of the Krakatoa and Tambora explosions. He concluded that Tambora was responsible for the subsequent cooling.

William Humphreys
Feb 3, 1862 – Nov 10, 1949
William_Jackson_Humphreys.jpg

Small Summary: Naturally we have an event of 1816 being blamed on a volcano which erupted in 1815. And all this was initially suggested in 1912, which is 96 years after the actual "Year Without Summer".

I will allow myself a few comments here. First of all, I find it very strange, that Google Ngram gives us nothing for "Cold Summer 1816", or "eighteen hundred and starve to death". Secondly, the first mentioning of the "year without summer", or "year without a summer" pertains to 1882.

year_without_summer_ngram.png

I do not understand why 65 years later in 1882, an event of 1816 acquires its own name. Who was out there to remember a couple cold summers from over half a century ago to the point of giving those summers their own name? This little article is from 1882 Donahoe's Magazine - Volume 6 - Page 452.

year_without_summer_1.png

There are two interesting parts to the above cutout. The one pertaining to the summer of 1816 appears to instruct people that the cold summer took place in 1816. Looks like people back then had a very different idea of when the cold summer actually happened. They had to be "reminded" that whatever year they had in mind had to be replaced with 1816. The second part is a non related coincidental article about 30-33 foot Giants.

year_without_summer_3.png


William G. Atkins, “History of Hawley”
West Cummington, Massachusetts -1887

year_without_summer_1816.jpg

1815 Tambora Eruption vs. Summer of 1816
Here is a bit from the official version of the Tambora Volcano Eruption, "The eruption column reached the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 43 kilometres (141,000 ft). The coarser ash particles settled out one to two weeks after the eruptions, but the finer ash particles stayed in the atmosphere from a few months to a few years at altitudes of 10–30 kilometres (33,000–98,000 ft). Longitudinal winds spread these fine particles around the globe, creating optical phenomena."

Basically, the general idea is that volcanic eruption which took place in April of 1815 wreaked havoc in North America and Europe in the summer of 1816. The Mount Tambora is located in the Southern hemisphere. The official version leads us to believe that "finer" particles stayed in the atmosphere and traveled all the way to North America and Europe. This is between 7100 and 8300 miles.

Mount Tambora_Scale_7100miles.jpgMount Tambora_Scale_8300miles.jpg

The particles were able to spread around the globe due to atmospheric longitudinal winds. Unfortunately such a route does not appear to be possible due to the Atmospheric Wind Pattern. Those "finer particles" were supposed to settle down around the equator, if we were to believe our scientists - Atmospheric Circulation & Models.


atmospheric_winds_1.GIFatmospheric_winds_2.JPGatmospheric_winds_3.pngAtmospheric-Circulation.jpg

Modern science clearly does not support the official reason of the "Year without Summer". And this so-called "official reason" does not explain how those "finer particles" were able to travel against the wind.

Additionally, the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo (largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century) also caused global temperatures to drop by about 0.5 °C (0.9 °F). The temperature drop occurred in the years 1991–93. Surprisingly neither 1991, nor 1992 are known as abnormally cold years. "Finer particles" chose not to travel half-way across the globe, and stayed local, causing moderate damages.

Mount_Pinatubo_Eruption.png

Surprisingly, this historic Tambora Eruption is not even recorded in the official timeline of Australian History: 1815, 1816. Yet Australia is only 650 miles away.

Mount Tambora_Scale_650miles.jpg

Russian Exclusion of 1816
While North America, and Europe were freezing and starving to death by the hundreds of thousands, the Russian Empire was miraculously spared the honors. May be Gulf Stream got lost but things were seriously backwards.

1816_summer.pnggulfstream.jpg
Gibberish scientific language ensures that everything sounds credible, of course.
"Lists of famines in Russia show none in 1816. In 1817 there was a price rise in a limited area of the Empire. All-in-all, the Baltic Region had not suffered from Tambora's eruption unlike the lower mid-latitudes of Western and Central Europe. It is suggested that the Region, as well as the south of European Russia, were spared as they were crossed by air masses whose stratosphere had become depopulated of small volcanic particles, while the troposphere became cleansed of particles through washout by rain previously." - The 1810s in the Baltic region, 1816 in particular: Air temperatures, grain supply and mortality

Travellers in Russia, 1816
Travellers in Russia, 1816.jpg

What a bizarre selective "finer particle" pattern happened in 1816. Yet, with Russia spared, we know nothing of any mass exodus from Europe to Russia in 1816-1819. I guess ingenious creators of the Industrial Revolution were not smart enough to figure out where the crops were still growing, and summers were warm. And while this article does mention people fleeing to Russia, I was unable to find any evidence supporting the claim.

KD Tambora Eruption opinion: With the real reason behind the "year without summer" hidden from the general public, the volcanic eruption of the Tambora Mountain was used to explain the drastic weather changes of 1816.

I had a dream, which was not all a dream.

Meanwhile a few people were "vacationing" together in Switzerland from about May 20 to approximately October 10 of 1816. Those people were: Lord Byron, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont and John Polidori. Byron suggested that each member of the party should write a ghost story. Mary Shelley wrote her Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. John Polidori wrote The Vampyre (published in 1819). Among several things written by Lord Byron himself was his poem "Darkness". I think this poem is very telling when we consider the "year without summer".

Darkness
By Lord Byron (George Gordon)
I had a dream, which was not all a dream.
The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the stars
Did wander darkling in the eternal space,
Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earth
Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air;
Morn came and went—and came, and brought no day,
And men forgot their passions in the dread
Of this their desolation; and all hearts
Were chill'd into a selfish prayer for light:
And they did live by watchfires—and the thrones,
The palaces of crowned kings—the huts,
The habitations of all things which dwell,
Were burnt for beacons; cities were consum'd,
And men were gather'd round their blazing homes
To look once more into each other's face;
Happy were those who dwelt within the eye
Of the volcanos, and their mountain-torch:
A fearful hope was all the world contain'd;
Forests were set on fire—but hour by hour
They fell and faded—and the crackling trunks
Extinguish'd with a crash—and all was black.
The brows of men by the despairing light
Wore an unearthly aspect, as by fits
The flashes fell upon them; some lay down
And hid their eyes and wept; and some did rest
Their chins upon their clenched hands, and smil'd;
And others hurried to and fro, and fed
Their funeral piles with fuel, and look'd up
With mad disquietude on the dull sky,
The pall of a past world; and then again
With curses cast them down upon the dust,
And gnash'd their teeth and howl'd: the wild birds shriek'd
And, terrified, did flutter on the ground,
And flap their useless wings; the wildest brutes
Came tame and tremulous; and vipers crawl'd
And twin'd themselves among the multitude,
Hissing, but stingless—they were slain for food.
And War, which for a moment was no more,
Did glut himself again: a meal was bought
With blood, and each sate sullenly apart
Gorging himself in gloom: no love was left;
All earth was but one thought—and that was death
Immediate and inglorious; and the pang
Of famine fed upon all entrails—men
Died, and their bones were tombless as their flesh;
The meagre by the meagre were devour'd,
Even dogs assail'd their masters, all save one,
And he was faithful to a corse, and kept
The birds and beasts and famish'd men at bay,
Till hunger clung them, or the dropping dead
Lur'd their lank jaws; himself sought out no food,
But with a piteous and perpetual moan,
And a quick desolate cry, licking the hand
Which answer'd not with a caress—he died.
The crowd was famish'd by degrees; but two
Of an enormous city did survive,
And they were enemies: they met beside
The dying embers of an altar-place
Where had been heap'd a mass of holy things
For an unholy usage; they rak'd up,
And shivering scrap'd with their cold skeleton hands
The feeble ashes, and their feeble breath
Blew for a little life, and made a flame
Which was a mockery; then they lifted up
Their eyes as it grew lighter, and beheld
Each other's aspects—saw, and shriek'd, and died—
Even of their mutual hideousness they died,
Unknowing who he was upon whose brow
Famine had written Fiend. The world was void,
The populous and the powerful was a lump,
Seasonless, herbless, treeless, manless, lifeless—
A lump of death—a chaos of hard clay.
The rivers, lakes and ocean all stood still,
And nothing stirr'd within their silent depths;
Ships sailorless lay rotting on the sea,
And their masts fell down piecemeal: as they dropp'd
They slept on the abyss without a surge—
The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave,
The moon, their mistress, had expir'd before;
The winds were wither'd in the stagnant air,
And the clouds perish'd; Darkness had no need
Of aid from them—She was the Universe.
1816, the year in which the poem was written, was called "the year without summer", as strange weather and an inexplicable darkness caused record-cold temperatures across Europe, especially in Geneva. Byron claimed to have received his inspiration for the poem, saying he "wrote it... at Geneva, when there was a celebrated dark day, on which the fowls went to roost at noon, and the candles were lighted as at midnight". The search for a cause of the strange changes in the light of day only grew as scientists discovered sunspots on the sun so large that they could be seen with the naked eye. Newspapers such as the London Chronicle reported on the panic:

“The large spots which may now be seen upon the sun's disk have given rise to ridiculous apprehensions and absurd predictions. These spots are said to be the cause of the remarkable and wet weather we have had this Summer; and the increase of these spots is represented to announce a general removal of heat from the globe, the extinction of nature, and the end of the world.”

A scientist in Italy even predicted that the sun would go out on 18 July, shortly before Byron's writing of "Darkness". His "prophecy" caused riots, suicides, and religious fervour all over Europe. For example:

"A Bath girl woke her aunt and shouted at her that the world was ending, and the woman promptly plunged into a coma. In Liege, a huge cloud in the shape of a mountain hovered over the town, causing alarm among the "old women" who expected the end of the world on the eighteenth. In Ghent, a regiment of cavalry passing through the town during a thunderstorm blew their trumpets, causing "three-fourths of the inhabitants" to rush forth and throw themselves on their knees in the streets, thinking they had heard the seventh trumpet."

Byron also uses the hellish biblical language of the apocalypse to carry the real possibility of these events to his readers. The whole poem can be seen as a reference to Matthew 24:29: “the sun shall be darkened.” In line 32 it describes men “gnash their teeth” at the sky, a clear biblical parallel of hell. - Source

It appears Byron and Co got stuck on a lake in Geneva for 5 months without any possibility of leaving.

* * * * *
So, what disaster immortalized by Lord Byron happened in, supposedly, 1816? Europe and North America are in a pickle, struggling to understand what was happening. Nearby is the Russian Empire oblivious to the rest of the world dying of starvation. Simultaneously, Russia appears to suffer a pretty significant loss described in one of my previous articles: What happened to the Siberian forests 200 years ago?

siberia_map_outline.jpg

Is "history" diverting our attention from the area where some possible answers could be located? Should we turn to Russia for the cataclysmic causes of this event? Could all the "finer particles" come from the wiped out Siberian region? And could this be a man caused disaster?

Yet, something tells me that 1816 might not be the true year of the event. Between the Google Ngram data and the wording of the articles, there might be hidden yet another mystery; the one pertaining to the chronological shift.

year_without_summer_3.png

P.S. Strange enough, but around the same time Europeans start to re-discover the continent of Africa: 400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa.
 

ion.brad

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As you point out, those "finer particles" could not reach above France or Britain and, more than that, you cannot maintain such a temperature gradient for such a long period: the cold air from France, for example, will start to travel to Russia, Africa and America under the hotter air which came from Russia, Africa and America to replace it! If we whish to bring the hypothesis of some scalar weapons we need "geofences", vast regions like Hungary or Serbia (Ottoman Empire) where the hundreds of thousands of peoples would have feeled that gradient: why we are starving to death in our village without crops when fifty or one hundred kilometers away there is normal weather?! There are no such memories!

The fact that this story appeared almost a century after the event looks like a false flag event: there are not many still alive from that time to contradict the official version! That is a cover for something else: the siberian forests are telling a very ugly story! Maybe those frozen mammoths were killed just two hundreds years ago!
 

humanoidlord

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As you might have heard, the year of 1816 is known for being one of the coldest in our recent history. It is known under different names such as the Year Without a Summer, the Poverty Year, and Eighteen Hundred and Froze To Death. Severe climate abnormalities caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C (0.7–1.3 °F). Remember these numbers for we are going to need those later.


This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere. The Year Without a Summer was an agricultural disaster. The climatic aberrations of 1816 had the greatest effect on most of North America, Western Europe and Asia (China). (Notice how Russia is not included here)

I am not going to dive into the details. This 1816 was apparently cold enough to kill hundreds of thousands of people, destroy agriculture and distinguish itself in history by getting its own Wikipedia page. Below are a few links for your convenience. There are a lot of mind blowing details about the scale of the disaster.
In general, there was enough temperature related shenanigans between 16th and mid-19th centuries to justify the name they received: Little Ice Age.

Mount Tambora Volcanic Eruption
Of course, our scientists determined the cause of this drastic 1816 temperature change. The aberrations are now generally thought to have occurred because of the April 5–15, 1815, Mount Tambora volcanic eruption on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. The eruption had a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ranking of 7, a colossal event that ejected at least 100 km3 (24 cu mi) of material.


The eruption column reached the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 43 kilometres (141,000 ft). The coarser ash particles settled out one to two weeks after the eruptions, but the finer ash particles stayed in the atmosphere from a few months to a few years at altitudes of 10–30 kilometres (33,000–98,000 ft). Longitudinal winds spread these fine particles around the globe, creating optical phenomena. Prolonged and brilliantly coloured sunsets and twilights were seen frequently in London between 28 June and 2 July 1815 and 3 September and 7 October 1815. The glow of the twilight sky typically appeared orange or red near the horizon and purple or pink above.



So, just where did this direct link between the year 1816 weather and Mount Tambora eruption come from. Here is what NASA has to say about this "direct link".

A century and a half later, American oceanographer Henry Stommel and his wife, Elizabeth, published an article in 1979's Scientific American entitled “The Year Without a Summer.” They suggested that the eruption had caused a severe summertime cold snap during 1816 that resulted in killer frosts in New England and Europe. Soaring food prices and famine followed the frosts, to the degree that 1816 was also nicknamed “Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death.”

Henry Stommel
Sep 27, 1920 – Jan 17, 1992
View attachment 3267

The Stommels were revisiting an old controversy: can volcanic eruptions change the climate? The issue had first been taken up by scientists in 1901, when a pair of Swiss researchers proposed that the dust thrown up by a series of large volcanic eruptions could have caused the ice ages, by blocking out the Sun’s rays. However, they had no evidence to support their hypothesis. Despite the giant eruption of the island of Krakatau in Indonesia in 1883, and subsequent in-depth studies of the event, world temperature data hadn’t been collected.

The 1912 eruption of Mt. Katmai in Alaska motivated a number of others to probe the volcano-climate connection. Charles Greeley Abbott measured the sunlight reduction caused by Katmai’s eruption; William Jackson Humphreys, meanwhile, went back to the records of the Krakatoa and Tambora explosions. He concluded that Tambora was responsible for the subsequent cooling.

William Humphreys
Feb 3, 1862 – Nov 10, 1949
View attachment 3268

Small Summary: Naturally we have an event of 1816 being blamed on a volcano which erupted in 1815. And all this was initially suggested in 1912, which is 96 years after the actual "Year Without Summer".

I will allow myself a few comments here. First of all, I find it very strange, that Google Ngram gives us nothing for "Cold Summer 1816", or "eighteen hundred and starve to death". Secondly, the first mentioning of the "year without summer", or "year without a summer" pertains to 1882.


I do not understand why 65 years later in 1882, an event of 1816 acquires its own name. Who was out there to remember a couple cold summers from over half a century ago to the point of giving those summers their own name? This little article is from 1882 Donahoe's Magazine - Volume 6 - Page 452.


There are two interesting parts to the above cutout. The one pertaining to the summer of 1816 appears to instruct people that the cold summer took place in 1816. Looks like people back then had a very different idea of when the cold summer actually happened. They had to be "reminded" that whatever year they had in mind had to be replaced with 1816. The second part is a non related coincidental article about 30-33 foot Giants.

View attachment 3271

William G. Atkins, “History of Hawley”
West Cummington, Massachusetts -1887

View attachment 3288

1815 Tambora Eruption vs. Summer of 1816
Here is a bit from the official version of the Tambora Volcano Eruption, "The eruption column reached the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 43 kilometres (141,000 ft). The coarser ash particles settled out one to two weeks after the eruptions, but the finer ash particles stayed in the atmosphere from a few months to a few years at altitudes of 10–30 kilometres (33,000–98,000 ft). Longitudinal winds spread these fine particles around the globe, creating optical phenomena."

Basically, the general idea is that volcanic eruption which took place in April of 1815 wreaked havoc in North America and Europe in the summer of 1816. The Mount Tambora is located in the Southern hemisphere. The official version leads us to believe that "finer" particles stayed in the atmosphere and traveled all the way to North America and Europe. This is between 7100 and 8300 miles.


The particles were able to spread around the globe due to atmospheric longitudinal winds. Unfortunately such a route does not appear to be possible due to the Atmospheric Wind Pattern. Those "finer particles" were supposed to settle down around the equator, if we were to believe our scientists - Atmospheric Circulation & Models.



Modern science clearly does not support the official reason of the "Year without Summer". And this so-called "official reason" does not explain how those "finer particles" were able to travel against the wind.

Additionally, the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo (largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century) also caused global temperatures to drop by about 0.5 °C (0.9 °F). The temperature drop occurred in the years 1991–93. Surprisingly neither 1991, nor 1992 are known as abnormally cold years. "Finer particles" chose not to travel half-way across the globe, and stayed local, causing moderate damages.


Surprisingly, this historic Tambora Eruption is not even recorded in the official timeline of Australian History: 1815, 1816. Yet Australia is only 650 miles away.


Russian Exclusion of 1816
While North America, and Europe were freezing and starving to death by the hundreds of thousands, the Russian Empire was miraculously spared the honors. May be Gulf Stream got lost but things were seriously backwards.
Gibberish scientific language ensures that everything sounds credible, of course.
"Lists of famines in Russia show none in 1816. In 1817 there was a price rise in a limited area of the Empire. All-in-all, the Baltic Region had not suffered from Tambora's eruption unlike the lower mid-latitudes of Western and Central Europe. It is suggested that the Region, as well as the south of European Russia, were spared as they were crossed by air masses whose stratosphere had become depopulated of small volcanic particles, while the troposphere became cleansed of particles through washout by rain previously." - The 1810s in the Baltic region, 1816 in particular: Air temperatures, grain supply and mortality

Travellers in Russia, 1816
View attachment 3282

What a bizarre selective "finer particle" pattern happened in 1816. Yet, with Russia spared, we know nothing of any mass exodus from Europe to Russia in 1816-1819. I guess ingenious creators of the Industrial Revolution were not smart enough to figure out where the crops were still growing, and summers were warm. And while this article does mention people fleeing to Russia, I was unable to find any evidence supporting the claim.

KD Tambora Eruption opinion: With the real reason behind the "year without summer" hidden from the general public, the volcanic eruption of the Tambora Mountain was used to explain the drastic weather changes of 1816.

I had a dream, which was not all a dream.

Meanwhile a few people were "vacationing" together in Switzerland from about May 20 to approximately October 10 of 1816. Those people were: Lord Byron, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont and John Polidori. Byron suggested that each member of the party should write a ghost story. Mary Shelley wrote her Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. John Polidori wrote The Vampyre (published in 1819). Among several things written by Lord Byron himself was his poem "Darkness". I think this poem is very telling when we consider the "year without summer".

Darkness
By Lord Byron (George Gordon)

1816, the year in which the poem was written, was called "the year without summer", as strange weather and an inexplicable darkness caused record-cold temperatures across Europe, especially in Geneva. Byron claimed to have received his inspiration for the poem, saying he "wrote it... at Geneva, when there was a celebrated dark day, on which the fowls went to roost at noon, and the candles were lighted as at midnight". The search for a cause of the strange changes in the light of day only grew as scientists discovered sunspots on the sun so large that they could be seen with the naked eye. Newspapers such as the London Chronicle reported on the panic:

“The large spots which may now be seen upon the sun's disk have given rise to ridiculous apprehensions and absurd predictions. These spots are said to be the cause of the remarkable and wet weather we have had this Summer; and the increase of these spots is represented to announce a general removal of heat from the globe, the extinction of nature, and the end of the world.”

A scientist in Italy even predicted that the sun would go out on 18 July, shortly before Byron's writing of "Darkness". His "prophecy" caused riots, suicides, and religious fervour all over Europe. For example:

"A Bath girl woke her aunt and shouted at her that the world was ending, and the woman promptly plunged into a coma. In Liege, a huge cloud in the shape of a mountain hovered over the town, causing alarm among the "old women" who expected the end of the world on the eighteenth. In Ghent, a regiment of cavalry passing through the town during a thunderstorm blew their trumpets, causing "three-fourths of the inhabitants" to rush forth and throw themselves on their knees in the streets, thinking they had heard the seventh trumpet."

Byron also uses the hellish biblical language of the apocalypse to carry the real possibility of these events to his readers. The whole poem can be seen as a reference to Matthew 24:29: “the sun shall be darkened.” In line 32 it describes men “gnash their teeth” at the sky, a clear biblical parallel of hell. - Source

It appears Byron and Co got stuck on a lake in Geneva for 5 months without any possibility of leaving.

* * * * *
So, what disaster immortalized by Lord Byron happened in, supposedly, 1816? Europe and North America are in a pickle, struggling to understand what was happening. Nearby is the Russian Empire oblivious to the rest of the world dying of starvation. Simultaneously, Russia appears to suffer a pretty significant loss described in one of my previous articles: What happened to the Siberian forests 200 years ago?


Is "history" diverting our attention from the area where some possible answers could be located? Should we turn to Russia for the cataclysmic causes of this event? Could all the "finer particles" come from the wiped out Siberian region? And could this be a man caused disaster?

Yet, something tells me that 1816 might not be the true year of the event. Between the Google Ngram data and the wording of the articles, there might be hidden yet another mystery; the one pertaining to the chronological shift.


P.S. Strange enough, but around the same time Europeans start to re-discover the continent of Africa: 400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa.
i have two observations about this article, first one:
A Bath girl woke her aunt and shouted at her that the world was ending, and the woman promptly plunged into a coma. In Liege, a huge cloud in the shape of a mountain hovered over the town, causing alarm among the "old women" who expected the end of the world on the eighteenth. In Ghent, a regiment of cavalry passing through the town during a thunderstorm blew their trumpets, causing "three-fourths of the inhabitants" to rush forth and throw themselves on their knees in the streets, thinking they had heard the seventh trumpet."
*record scratch*
what?!
i dont know you but a nuclear mushroom cloud can look like a mountain from some angles....
second observation: patomskyi crater, google it now, it will blow your mind
 

humanoidlord

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whitewave

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Interesting site. Thanks for letting me join. Was curious about this 1882 year and googled it. Of course, typing in "year without a summer" brings up nothing but 1816. Typing "year without a summer 1882" brings up a little more. (This from the Michigan department of health Annual Report) Link

1882 was also known as the First International Polar Year in which climate change was studied in the Arctic by a cooperative agreement of 11 nations.
 
OP
KorbenDallas

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Not sure googling "year without summer of 1882" would produce proper results. That 1882 publication appears to be trying to correct some date people had in mind. If it happened in 1882, there would have been nothing to talk about. I think may be 1830s, or early 1840s.
 

Magnetic

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I don't believe the wiki explanation of the obscuring darkness that Lord Byron wrote about. Here is my interpretation of the poem "Darkness".
I had a dream, which was not all a dream. (A nightmare reality that is so harsh to seem unreal).
The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the stars (The power of the sun and stars is reduced and it's not just due to atmospheric dust)
Did wander darkling in the eternal space,
Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earth
Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air; (The moon did not have enough power to illuminate itself-the power line of the magneto-electric field was greatly reduced).
Morn came and went—and came, and brought no day,
And men forgot their passions in the dread
Of this their desolation; and all hearts
Were chill'd into a selfish prayer for light: (The psychology of men during these times was desperate).
And they did live by watchfires—and the thrones,
The palaces of crowned kings—the huts,
The habitations of all things which dwell,
Were burnt for beacons; cities were consum'd,
And men were gather'd round their blazing homes
To look once more into each other's face; (the only way to generate light and heat was to burn whatever they could).

I don't believe the wiki explanation of the obscuring darkness that Lord Byron wrote about. Here is my interpretation of the poem "Darkness".
I had a dream, which was not all a dream. (A nightmare reality that is so harsh to seem unreal).
The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the stars (The power of the sun and stars is reduced and it's not just due to atmospheric dust)
Did wander darkling in the eternal space,
Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earth
Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air; (The moon did not have enough power to illuminate itself-the power line of the magneto-electric field was greatly reduced).
Morn came and went—and came, and brought no day,
And men forgot their passions in the dread
Of this their desolation; and all hearts
Were chill'd into a selfish prayer for light: (The psychology of men during these times was desperate).

The flashes fell upon them; (lightning strikes so they lay down to not attract the energy)
The habitations of all things which dwell,
Were burnt for beacons; cities were consum'd,
And men were gather'd round their blazing homes
To look once more into each other's face; (the only way to generate light and heat was to burn whatever they could).
With curses cast them down upon the dust.(There was dust).
And War, which for a moment was no more,
Did glut himself again: a meal was bought
With blood, and each sate sullenly apart
Gorging himself in gloom: no love was left;(Breakdown of society, canabalism, and war for food).
The world was void,
The populous and the powerful was a lump,
Seasonless, herbless, treeless, manless, lifeless—
A lump of death—a chaos of hard clay. (The entire ecosystem crashed)
The rivers, lakes and ocean all stood still,
And nothing stirr'd within their silent depths;
They slept on the abyss without a surge—
The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave,
The moon, their mistress, had expir'd before;
The winds were wither'd in the stagnant air,(The magneto-electric field became extremely weak and the tide stopped, the waves stopped, and the wind stopped).
In short we have a near turning off of the magneto-electric field which revolves around us that powers the environment. The giant sunspots show the energy was greatly reduced so the moon was invisible from not enough power to get it in glow mode. Yes the dust had some effect but the dust could not cause the sun to have gigantic sun spots visible with the naked eye and instead it was a near collapse of the magnetic field which in turn caused the ecosystem to die. The lack of winds, rain, and tide show this was not just a dust caused event although it didn't help the situation. The great comet was the initiator of the event by disturbing the stable magneto-electric field of the earth and sun.
 
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ISeenItFirst

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My takeaway here is that sunspots could be seen with the naked eye. Who the heck can even glance at the sun these days? I can't look anywhere near it. The sun I saw as a kid, I could probably look long enough to discern a sun spot, if it were big enough...

KD has once again poked some holes in the official history. Seems the volcano could not be responsible for this. The Siberian event, might be a candidate though. Very interesting.
 

jd755

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1816 A.D.
The Tambora eruption occurred on 10 April 1815 on Sumbawa Islands in Indonesia. It was rated as a 7 on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI). 20 The volcanic eruptions of this size are very rare events typically occurring on a millennium scale. Analysis of Peirce’s temperature data shows that the eruption did not begin to affect Philadelphia, Pennsylvania’s weather in the United States until 11 months later in March 1816. Then temperatures were depressed for nine months before recovering. At its
greatest extent, temperatures were 7.7° F (4.3° C) colder than average Dalton Minimum monthly averages. This year was known as the “Year Without Summer”. But that does not really begin to describe the event for the people of Philadelphia, the Northeast United States and Canada. It was the year
when a hard killer frost occurred in every month of the year.

This extreme cold year also ravaged Europe, Africa, the West Indies and Northern China. The volcanic eruption also affected the rain patterns in 1816. The cooler temperatures delayed India’s summer monsoon. It brought late torrential rains to India that spawned cholera epidemics. The monsoon in China caused massive floods in the Yangtze Valley.

In Burgundy, France, the grape harvest began on 15 October. This was the latest harvest date since 1809.The yield was exceptionally small and the wine was of poor quality. It rained in Burgundy almost continuously from May to December. The cereal harvest was generally inadequate, and the median price of a hectoliter of grain rose to 35 francs.
In the countryside of Toulouse, France, spring and summer were cold, wet, and rainy. The months of September and October only were dry and a little warm. The year was exceptionally cold and wet, and very strange.
The summer in France, Switzerland, and Germany were remarkable because of the rain. In Denmark, Sweden and Russia the weather was very nice. To complete the description of this large climate anomaly, a drought occurred in the lower Languedoc the caused the failure of crops. In Sorèze, France, the harvest was late. The greater part of the grain had been stored due to the rain. The maize was sown very late and with great difficulty. When harvested, the maize earned very little. There were no grapes, no fruit, the food was alone was sufficient but spoiled. In July, corn in the south sold for 36 and 40 francs per hectoliter and the grain sold for 48 to 50 francs per hectoliter.

On 2 January 1816 at Strabane, Ireland, there was an inundation caused by the melting of the snow on the surrounding mountains. As a result, most destructive floods were occasioned.
On 12 January 1816, there was an inundation at Strabane, in Ireland, by the melting of the snow on the surrounding mountains, the most destructive flood that had been witnessed for 20 years.
In England in February, great floods occurred in Northumberland and Durham. This was the greatest flood ever remembered for this location.
On 12 February 1816, the greatest flood ever remembered occurred in Northumberland and Durham,England.
On 27 February 1816, considerable damage was done at Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, and other northern towns in England, by tremendous gales of wind.
In March 1816, fifty-three villages in the great Werder, Germany; forty-nine villages in the districts of Siegenhoff [Siegenhof, Germany]; and seventeen Elbing [Elbląg, Poland] villages were under water.
On 21 March 1816 in Germany [now part of Poland], the Vistula River overflowed; many villages were laid under water, and great loss of life and property was sustained.
In Ireland on April 21/22, there were great floods at Londonderry.

In June 1816, there was a major flood at Hawkesbury/Nepean Valley in New South Wales, Australia.The water level was recorded at 45.5 feet (13.88 meters) above the water mark at Windsor.
On 10 June 1816 in Bavaria, there was a hailstorm. All the crops and produce on the banks of the Danube River, near Munich, Germany were destroyed for a circle of 10 leagues (30 miles, 48.3 kilometers)
On 28 June 1816 in Germany, there was a dreadful hurricane near Vibbel (Frankfort). The storm tore down trees and buildings. "The hail lay 2 feet (0.6 meters) deep in the streets and fields. It was so dark that it was necessary to use candles."
A rare June snowstorms struck Vermont in the United States dumping six to ten inches (15-25 centimeters) of snow; the interior of New York state received three inches (8 centimeters); and several inches fell in New Hampshire and Maine.
On 2 July 1816, a dreadful storm fell upon the town of Worschetz, [Vršac, Serbia] in the county of Timeswar, that of 2,600 buildings, none escaped without damage.
On 11 July 1816 in Hungary, there was a dreadful hailstorm at the town of Worschetz. Of the 2,600 buildings of which the town was composed, a great many were seriously injured.

All from the weather chronology pdf. All sources are in the reference section of that document.

Russia it seems had a fine summer as did Switerland and Germany and yet the following year 1817 Germany is said to have suffered a famine. No further mention of the other two countries
 

Glumlit

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Not sure googling "year without summer of 1882" would produce proper results. That 1882 publication appears to be trying to correct some date people had in mind. If it happened in 1882, there would have been nothing to talk about. I think may be 1830s, or early 1840s.
What makes you think 1830/40s as opposed to 1816 or earlier?
 

Glumlit

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I think there had to be an event which either triggered, or was a part of the wars of 1840s-1860s. That’s just my working hypothesis which I did not have time to revisit.
Now you've got me wondering if it did that for the war(s) of 1812. Can't seem to find any newspaper articles, or in fact any newspapers, specifically from between the years 1810 - 1817. Like at all..
 

whitewave

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Now you've got me wondering if it did that for the war(s) of 1812. Can't seem to find any newspaper articles, or in fact any newspapers, specifically from between the years 1810 - 1817. Like at all..
I found articles/newspapers from 1812 but the war wasn't declared until June of that year and every single mention of 1812 has nothing but the war. What were they reporting on from January until the June declaration?

That seems strange to me that such a remarkable event as a year without a summer would not be mentioned. For a mostly agrarian society at that time I assumed there would be discussions about the weather and how crops would have been affected. Maybe something on the prices of crops that would've been scarcer due to the cold weather. This is what I found:

17060


Library of Congress > Newspapers > Search - FORMAT Newspaper
Search Newspapers Collections with Newspapers

No results found for crops frozen 1816 ***
got same results for 1817, 1818, 1819
Odd that the Library of Congress has no mention in their vast stores of literature of all sorts anything at all for frozen crops in the year 1816. I see plenty of archived newspaper articles (that you have you pay a subscription to read the articles) but, oddly enough, they're all written from 1924-1960. There's even a 2016 article by USA Today reminding us of the year without a summer. I am able to find 1848 as a year that crops failed due to excessive cold and Niagara Falls freezing. The exact same picture of a frozen Niagara Falls is dated 1911 and the exact same one again for 1938.
So apparently, the "once in a lifetime event" of Niagara freezing occurred 3 times in 90 years but not at all in the year without a summer.

17061
17062

Holy cow! I keep putting in 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819 and all it will pull up is from 1904 onward. Niagara tourism bureau says the Falls froze in 1848. Finding newspaper articles describing the conditions of the year without a summer or the following years (in which gazillions of people supposedly died from starvation and hypothermia) is not findable-at least by me. This has my curiosity thoroughly piqued. I hope someone else has better search skills than me.
 

Glumlit

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That's where I was looking. A Delaware gazette is the only paper I could find within the dates. After finding nothing repeatedly, simply searched for mentions of "Delaware" from between 1810-1817.

Not a single thing between June 6, 1810 and May 24, 1817.

Here's the passage that sparked my interest..
17068


Shabbona (1775-1859) fought alongside Tecumseh, and saw him killed in 1813. He put
the freeze at "about 1810."

I would find it puzzling to remember such life-defining events out of order.

Something killed all his friends and buffaloes, THEN he joined a war? Or did he get back from the war first, only to see the rest of his life all freeze to death a couple years later...
 

Mabzynn

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That's where I was looking. A Delaware gazette is the only paper I could find within the dates. After finding nothing repeatedly, simply searched for mentions of "Delaware" from between 1810-1817.

Not a single thing between June 6, 1810 and May 24, 1817.

Here's the passage that sparked my interest..
View attachment 17068

Shabbona (1775-1859) fought alongside Tecumseh, and saw him killed in 1813. He put
the freeze at "about 1810."

I would find it puzzling to remember such life-defining events out of order.

Something killed all his friends and buffaloes, THEN he joined a war? Or did he get back from the war first, only to see the rest of his life all freeze to death a couple years later...
Incredible how all other newspapers/articles seem to disappear from 1810-1818 other than the Delaware Gazette, and from 1819 to 1820 there are no publications whatsoever:

But - Found a story from an earthquake in 1809 near Table Mountain.

17071
17072


Later in the article it discusses a strange hurricane:

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The Delaware gazette. (Wilmington, [Del.]) 1809-1810, May 12, 1810, Image 3

The world wakes up from radio silence and floods are everywhere.
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And then more flooding all along the Hudson

17079
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Delaware gazette and peninsula advertiser. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1814-1820, August 20, 1817, Image 2


I can't really make sense of this timeline but it's pretty clear they don't want us to know what happened between 1809 and 1820.

---------------------------------------

It just gets better and better with the origin of the Delaware Gazette which went through a couple name changes
17086

About The Delaware gazette. (Wilmington, [Del.]) 1809-1810 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress:

17082

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 43


The first editor was a merchant and the son of a London banker:

Dr. John Vaughan-
17083


James M. Broom-
Member of the Delaware Bar in 1801. Other members have posted about the BAR guild.
His father was on the board of the Delaware bank and connected to the Du Pont's.
17084
 
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Red Bird

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I saw this article and of course thought of this thread and the ‘dark days’.
How a volcano short-circuited Earth's ionosphere to trigger "Year Without A Summer"

Summer long ago, exactly what mechanisms were at play have remained a mystery. The Imperial College London study aimed to help explain how this dramatic climate event played out...

. "My research, however, shows that ash can be shot into the upper atmosphere by electrical forces."
As demonstrated by dramatic images of lightning coursing through volcanic plumes, the ash is electrically charged. The interplay of electrostatic forces can lift that ash higher than previously thought, according to Genge.
"Volcanic plumes and ash both can have negative electrical charges and thus the plume repels the ash, propelling it high in the atmosphere," says Genge. "The effect works very much like the way two magnets are pushed away from each other if their poles match."
To test the idea, Genge modeled how well charged volcanic ash would electrostatically levitate under these conditions. Their experiments showed that particularly violent eruptions could launch particles smaller than 500 nanometers wide up into the ionosphere.
That's important because the ionosphere is a very electrically-active region of the Earth's atmosphere. According to Genge, having charged particles that high up
could effectively "short-circuit" the ionosphere, creating climate anomalies such as increased cloud cover that reflects sunlight away from Earth and cools the surface of the planet.

I found the above while looking up something from the following wild article, and trying to figure out what the heck it meant.

https://stillnessinthestorm.com/2016/07/12-things-you-should-know-about-scalar-weapons/
See #8 last line, though it does mention time travel earlier:

Now HAARP is slicing up the ionosphere, the world-brain, like a microwave knife, producing long tear incisions destroying the membrane which holds the reservoir of data accumulated by all earth’s history. HAARP has already punched 360 x 30 miles holes in the ionosphere.

Are these volcanic, and other catastrophes, plus our present (and perhaps Tartarian past) increased usage of EM power effecting the ionosphere and causing weird time rifts or something?
While I think EM power is involved in the past and definitely now on some level I admit that I’ve been more on the propaganda/ mind control side of the lost history matter.
 

Obertryn

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I'm guessing there was a world war that occurred some time during the early 1800's. Major global powers all participated and Napoleon was probably at the center of it (it's worth noting that up until the early-to-mid 1900's, Napoleon was demonized almost as much as Hitler is today). It was split into smaller conflicts later during historical "rewriting" and some battles/details might have been omitted. Hell, Lord Byron's poem even sounds like something that might have been written by a civilian suffering from PTSD during World War I/World War II (which, according to this hypothesis, would actually be World War II/World War III). Just throwing that out there.
 

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