1800s house interiors. Where are the bathrooms?

KorbenDallas

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Spent some time googling for the 19th century bathrooms. In ref. to:
Was hoping to find something pre-1875ish. Failed miserably. Found a website with a few interiors, which are below. If you see anything interesting in those photographs, please share your finds.

Rare Photos Inside 1800'S Victorian Houses
19th century interiors_1.jpg19th century interiors_2.jpg19th century interiors_4.jpg19th century interiors_5.jpg
19th century interiors_6.jpg19th century interiors_7.jpg19th century interiors_8.jpg19th century interiors_9.jpg
19th century interiors_10.jpg19th century interiors_11.jpg19th century interiors_12.jpg19th century interiors_13.jpg
Inside 1800'S Victorian Houses
KD: If you stumble across anything interesting as far as pre-1875 interiors go, or if you come across a bathroom photo, please post.
 

Onijunbei

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I don't think you are going to find a bathroom brother. According to wiki the water closets weren't moved inside the house until 1850. Chamber pots and pit latrines for the poor and garderobes for the rich...A lot of Victorian style homes had to be retrofitted with a bathroom by using existing space in the foyer or formal room and upstairs by the space of a bedroom...
 
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BossesWife

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I don't think you are going to find a bathroom brother. According to wiki the water closets weren't moved inside the house until 1850. Chamber pots and pit latrines for the poor and garderobes for the rich...A lot of Victorian style homes had to be retrofitted with a bathroom by using existing space in the foyer or formal room and upstairs by the space of a bedroom...

So the concept of bathrooms hasn’t been around that long, did they wash up in the bedrooms?
 

dreamtime

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this is really one of the most fascinating topics to me. There was this period of total sanitation chaos in the 19th century which strongly suggests an abrupt and sudden change in how society works, but the million dollar question is how did people solve those problems of cleaning, hygiene, etc. before.

The old renaissance pictures tell us of angel-like, naked beings bathing in magical fountains and having fun together, but that may not be what happened.

If someone would solve this puzzle, I feel lots of things would fall into place.
 
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BrokenAgate

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Third photo in the top row.... That furniture is awfully close to the fireplace, isn't it? One stray spark landing on the upholstery or carpeting, and the whole house could go up in flames.

I find the subject of the lack of bathrooms in these old homes to be completely baffling. These houses are works of art, the larger buildings are often on grounds including fountains and gardens requiring extensive plumbing. Yet we are to believe that the people who made all that stuff somehow were just too stupid to figure out that they could also put plumbing in the actual houses, and have flush toilets. So, here's a thought: What if those pre-reset buildings did have some kind of restroom facilities, only they weren't recognized as such by the survivors? Maybe, in the past, people dealt with human wastes in a different way, one that didn't involve flushing it into the water system and then filtering it out in vast sewage plants like we do now. You'd think they would still need things like sinks and showers and bathtubs, though, for washing up, and those were lacking, as well, until they were later retrofitted in.
 

jd755

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Toilets require sewers or 'night soil men'. Here on the isles of britain there is evidence some previous inhabitants (usually quoted as roman but personally not convinced) built communal latrines where erveryone sat on wooden boards with suitable holes in them over stone troughs with flowing water to carry their excrement away.
They also had communal bath houses.
Then for some unexplained reason they went out of use after the 'romans' left and the inhabitants we are told (always bloody told) took to crapping wherever they could more or less. Don't buy these sto now i have seen just how sanitary a composting toilet is.
 

dreamtime

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Don't buy these sto now i have seen just how sanitary a composting toilet is.
Having cities of enourmous proportions without any structural hint to anything sanitation is the real mystery.

There's simply nothing. And as @BrokenAgate said, the available infrastructure proves that they had the building abilities.

One question we could ask, were those people even eating typical food, and are we even talking about humans.
 

jd755

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Having cities of enourmous proportions without any structural hint to anything sanitation is the real mystery.

There's simply nothing. And as @BrokenAgate said, the available infrastructure proves that they had the building abilities.

One question we could ask, were those people even eating typical food, and are we even talking about humans.
Well all sewers are underground so more or less invisible save where they enter treatment works even today. I used to have a book about the 'lost rivers of london' which aren't actually lost just pushed underground by modern development and the book talked about them as being open sewers with all the associated diseases that erupt in unsanitary conditions.
In most of the castles I have been round, actually abbey's and monastary's too come to think of it there is precious little evidence for any sanitation.
Strikes me that the de-populating of the countryside during the industrial expansion overloaded whatever sanitation there was in towns/cities of the day until sewers were invented or reinvented hence the toilet became the norm. Middens were used in rural areas if my memory is working to dump all waste in.
 

AgentOrange5

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Third photo in the top row.... That furniture is awfully close to the fireplace, isn't it? One stray spark landing on the upholstery or carpeting, and the whole house could go up in flames.

This is a bit of a side note, but that was one thing that struck me about the pictures in this thread...how very cluttered the houses were. Seems to go against the main-stream teaching that clutter is a modern 1st world consumerism problem, and that people in the past live far simpler lives with far less material goods. Perhaps that was true of the majority, the poorer folk, but I was surprised at how much seems crammed into small places in these pictures.
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And a question, why were pictures hung so they leaned away from the walls? Picture 7 above shows this most prominently, but several of the other pictures also show this. I have never seen this done like that before.
 

Andromeda

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Well all sewers are underground so more or less invisible save where they enter treatment works even today. I used to have a book about the 'lost rivers of london' which aren't actually lost just pushed underground by modern development and the book talked about them as being open sewers with all the associated diseases that erupt in unsanitary conditions.
In most of the castles I have been round, actually abbey's and monastary's too come to think of it there is precious little evidence for any sanitation.
Strikes me that the de-populating of the countryside during the industrial expansion overloaded whatever sanitation there was in towns/cities of the day until sewers were invented or reinvented hence the toilet became the norm. Middens were used in rural areas if my memory is working to dump all waste in.
It is fair to assume that sanitation existed if mud floods buried the hypothetical layers beneath.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Funny how with hundreds of thousands of those building we are unable to look at single original blueprint to sort this bathroom thing out.

It’s almost like there was no paper documentation to start with. What did they use? Computers?
 

vaerospace

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Importantly , the 1878 abandoned San Francisco Images tell us this city had running tap water in the dwellings , where are the dams , the storage and filtration / purification treatment facilities and where are the pumping stations , also where is the sewerage and the associated manholes/ covers and reticulation network
 

dreamtime

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Funny how with hundreds of thousands of those building we are unable to look at single original blueprint to sort this bathroom thing out.

It’s almost like there was no paper documentation to start with. What did they use? Computers?
This is getting progressively more likely for me.

They used some form of the internet. Some form of using light, electro-magnetism and crystals. That would have been the first to be obliterated by sun-eruptions. Maybe even up to the 17th/18th Century.

How likely is it that in the 20th century people develop a crystal and light-based technology that was totally novel in the history of mankind? I don't think it's likely.

The reason the world desparetely pushed for global communication in the 19th was probably because it was used to precisely this kind of world, so there were still leftover processes in society that were based upon communication, and people were trying tro build upon that.

Imagine the scenario of a digitalized world, where some people had physical history documents in their houses for the sake of preserving an interesting history, just like some people collect art, and those ancient paper documents were then used by the church and others to paint the history in an entirely new light.

The Victorian Internet - Wikipedia

170px-New_York_utility_lines_in_1890.jpg

Wired city in 1890

lossy-page1-1920px-Map_showing_overland_Pacific_Telegraph_from_San_Francisco_to_Moscow,_submit...jpg

Global network proposal, 1862​
 
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jd755

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This is a bit of a side note, but that was one thing that struck me about the pictures in this thread...how very cluttered the houses were. Seems to go against the main-stream teaching that clutter is a modern 1st world consumerism problem, and that people in the past live far simpler lives with far less material goods. Perhaps that was true of the majority, the poorer folk, but I was surprised at how much seems crammed into small places in these pictures.
Post automatically merged:

And a question, why were pictures hung so they leaned away from the walls? Picture 7 above shows this most prominently, but several of the other pictures also show this. I have never seen this done like that before.
The pictures are hanging from wooden picture rails with one of these things as 'the hanger'. When i was a nipper in the sixties my parents house had pictures similarly hung and it was built in the early thirties.

hook.jpg

and here is the rail profile.

rail.jpg

As for the fireplaces and clutter the fireplaces had fire guards or screens to prevent sparks from doing too much damage and hot coals from escaping. Old carpets were not made from petrochemicals and were reluctant to catch fire preferring to char instead. As they were expensive items in comparison to the wooden floors greater care was taken by the servants.
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Here's one from 1879 and more at the link.

MAB1_683.JPG

And more at this search

Difficulty is getting past the gatekeeper twins wikiliar and pinterest but will plug away.
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From one persons search into the history of their home in England.
"I also learnt that in 1848 a Health Act was passed which led to laws requiring access lanes to be built for the removal of waste from houses – there were no flushing toilets in those days! The original drainage channel can still be seen in the passageway at the back of my house."
"I found that it was built between 1877 and 1890"


Still late 19th century but the 1848 act date is worthy of note.

ground-floor-plan.jpg
 
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Jef Demolder

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How things have changed in the time of one generation. When I was a child (born in 1955) we had no bathroom in our house, and no house in our street had a bathroom. We had a daily little wash at the pump in the kitchen, and on Saturday a "bath" standing in a zinc basin with hot water in the back kitchen. The toilet was always outside the house, in a little room on the courtyard, the hole in the wooden board being just above the cesspool.
 

vaerospace

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Bathrooms - Tartarian Architecture , are there Hot and Cold Taps Indoors , are there Indoor Toilets... For those who may watch my ipcoming video on the SF empty cityscapes 1878 ... I will be asking where the laundry was dried ?

Oh ps .. was scratching my British TV series itch last night watching "Silent Witness" S22E05/06 and the show focussed on Brighton England , which suprise suprise , is JAM PACKED with Tararian Houses...
 

AgentOrange5

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This is getting progressively more likely for me.
The reason the world desparetely pushed for global communication in the 19th was probably because it was used to precisely this kind of world, so there were still leftover processes in society that were based upon communication, and people were trying tro build upon that.
Imagine the scenario of a digitalized world, where some people had physical history documents in their houses for the sake of preserving an interesting history, just like some people collect art, and those ancient paper documents were then used by the church and others to paint the history in an entirely new light.
What you are saying makes a lot of sense. While I have old documents, pictures, receipts, manuals, etc from 2005 and before.....after that time, I scan in everything and almost never keep the original. So this would make a lot of sense, if the world were "computerized" (or whatever they equivalent would have been called) at that time period, that would explain why there are so few original's to be found.
 

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