1800s house interiors. Heating Systems.

nothingnew

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What did I stumble upon now searching for colorized images. Apparently the year 1918, showing Sergei Prokofiev.

edqRN6U.jpg

Steam central heating or frequency/heat radiating device? Maybe these were added afterwards, even though there are sun symbols depicted on it (as in the rest of these houses). Anyone seen any "radiator" like this?

Another one, how tall was this dude? :unsure:
 
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jd755

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What did I stumble upon now searching for colorized images. Apparently the year 1918, showing Sergei Prokofiev

View attachment 16090



Steam central heating or frequency/heat radiating device? Maybe these were added afterwards, even though there are sun symbols depicted on it (as in the rest of these houses). Anyone seen any "radiator" like this?


Another one, how tall was this dude? :unsure:
That's a gas fire or more accurately gas radiant heater. Underneath it running in from the left is the gas supply pipe. The control valve handle is the round thing front and centre. The burner bar is in the bottom of the hollow ceramic radiating block (the white thing) behind the black plate running across the front and when running the ceramic glowed red from the heat of the gas flames hence the radiant part of its name.
The burn marks on the curved white bit are from dust that settles on it when its not being used.
I've never worked on one this old but a few dating from the fifties and sixties.
Of interest is the grill in the wall to the right of his knees. Either it is an air vent supplying air to the radiant heater or more likely its coal fire predecessor or it is a warmed air vent provided warmed air to the room from a heating furnace of some description which suggests he is pictured most likely not in a private house but a hotel of some sort or a government building or large mansion.
o
 
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nothingnew

nothingnew

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So it must have been added later? Considering the ventilation hole in the wall. :unsure:

No sane mind would build a house with ventilation inside the walls, yet leave the gas lines exposed and ugly. It does not match the attention to detail that is all over the place in these kind of buildings.
 

jd755

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So it must have been added later? Considering the ventilation hole in the wall. :unsure:

No sane mind would build a house with ventilation inside the walls, yet leave the gas lines exposed and ugly. It does not match the attention to detail that is all over the place in these kind of buildings.
Coal fire being the original fire in the fireplace then the modern, at the time, (now where have we heard that before) gas fire replacing the coal once town gas was available wherever this photo was taken.
Look at how ugly the current 'modern' is compared to older buildings and interiors. The fire itself is very elegant, again unlike the currently modern versions but going to the length of hiding the supply pipe under the floorboards or in the walls would be time consuming and very dirty destroying some of the elegance of the room in the process.

Just had a closer look at the fireplace and the cast iron coal fire is still there. The grate and the fire basket have been removed to allow the free standing gas fire to stand in front of and independent of the cast insert (to use the modern vernacular). The gas fire then vents through the original chimney. Basically a minimal disruption modernisation, if you will.
The air vent was installed for the original coal fire, most likely.
 
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