17th-18th Century Transformation of the Japanese Archipelago

anotherlayer

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What's your opinion of Shoch? I found him talking alongside the pyramid guy. Why would he go along with the pyramids being watered/rained on, and not underwater structures? I hope this doesn't derail anything, just curious. I know Hancock has a less than stella rep. in this circle. I heard what Hancock/Shoch had to say and it opened my view up but I haven't followed them since.
I have a personal issue with Hancock and that is... he came out publicly that he quit weed because his life revolved around it. But, then he left all of his great ideas behind and started writing fantasy again, all clouded with his infatuation with Ayahuasca/DMT. I feel he just lost the plot (as a new historian). I'm an old Head, I get drugs, I've seen "god", I get it. But, to really push such a delicate environment, I think it's a little misguided (throw NewEarth in there as another pro-DMT'er).

Then, he shows up on Joe Rogan and he starts to antagonize those who don't agree with him (which is basically anyone who got turned on by him, otherwise, no one knows who the heck he even is). This bothered me the most because he was in the same position with his theories and here he goes joining the shady media force behind all misconceptions and misdirections.

I love Schoch, I really do, he's on the verge of being that grumpy Indiana Jones type. Unfortunately, he'll be long dead before we see that rainwater caused erosion to the Sphinx is in any history book. Anyway, Graham tells the story that he brings Schoch to dive Yonaguni. Schoch was already nervous as heck and he had a small go at it. Apparently, he panicked or equipment failure (I can't tell what was being blamed) and he had enough. What Schoch did see during his brief dive amounted to what he considers full on naturally made. Maybe that's why those two have drifted apart and they aren't smoking weed on Rogan's podcast with Randall and Elon...
 
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UnusualBean

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There is obviously two different cultures at play here. Building golden palaces requires civilized people and cannibalizing prisoners is the exact opposite of civilized behaviour.

Great article. Very well researched.
There's a lot of confusing bits about Japanese history that I've been trying to compile into an at least slightly coherent post for a while now, but canonically Japan used to have a de facto military government headed by a guy called a shōgun, which is an abbreviation for the full title that basically translates to "commander in chief in the war against the barbarians". I've been trying to figure out who exactly these barbarians really were, but cannibalism definitely sounds barbaric.
It would be interesting to find out the perception of people living in Japan on these tsunami stones. @pushamaku
The stones refer to two huge tsunamis that occurred in 1896 and 1933 and killed a ton of people along the coast, so they're not that old, but they're old enough that a lot of people stopped heeding them until the 2011 tsunami. I think the general sense is basically "Oh, we probably should've paid more attention to those things".
 

whitewave

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There's a lot of confusing bits about Japanese history that I've been trying to compile into an at least slightly coherent post for a while now, but canonically Japan used to have a de facto military government headed by a guy called a shōgun, which is an abbreviation for the full title that basically translates to "commander in chief in the war against the barbarians". I've been trying to figure out who exactly these barbarians really were, but cannibalism definitely sounds barbaric.
From what I've read about Japanese history it started from China. An emperor who was obsessed with obtaining eternal life had heard about a fountain of eternal life and equipped a ship to go in search of it. The ship returned and said they'd found it but it was guarded and the guardian required a heavy fee: people and riches. The emperor readily agreed, loaded his best craftsmen and skilled artisans, intellectuals and riches and sent the ship captain on his way to trade for the magic elixir. The captain never returned and shortly after what is now Japan was peopled with new arrivals. :) The captain sounds like a pirate at heart and a clever fellow.

Also, Japanese are not the original inhabitants of Japan. The Ainu were there first. The Japanese considered them savages and hunted them mercilessly. They chased them from the South (where the Japanese originally landed) to the North where the few remaining survivors still live in Yezu. The Ainu, being hunted and driven from their homes in turn chased out the "little people" (cave dwelling dwarves) that lived in the North.

The Smithsonian sent out some guy in the 1800's to investigate these Ainu peoples and he sent back his report which I've got stashed in my files somewhere. He says that after 1000 years of interaction with the Japanese, the Ainu people still have not adapted or learned any improvements for their living conditions that the Japanese introduced to them. A gentle, peaceful people that still live a stone age existence.
 

Verity

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From what I've read about Japanese history it started from China. An emperor who was obsessed with obtaining eternal life had heard about a fountain of eternal life and equipped a ship to go in search of it. The ship returned and said they'd found it but it was guarded and the guardian required a heavy fee: people and riches. The emperor readily agreed, loaded his best craftsmen and skilled artisans, intellectuals and riches and sent the ship captain on his way to trade for the magic elixir. The captain never returned and shortly after what is now Japan was peopled with new arrivals. :) The captain sounds like a pirate at heart and a clever fellow.

Also, Japanese are not the original inhabitants of Japan. The Ainu were there first. The Japanese considered them savages and hunted them mercilessly. They chased them from the South (where the Japanese originally landed) to the North where the few remaining survivors still live in Yezu. The Ainu, being hunted and driven from their homes in turn chased out the "little people" (cave dwelling dwarves) that lived in the North.

The Smithsonian sent out some guy in the 1800's to investigate these Ainu peoples and he sent back his report which I've got stashed in my files somewhere. He says that after 1000 years of interaction with the Japanese, the Ainu people still have not adapted or learned any improvements for their living conditions that the Japanese introduced to them. A gentle, peaceful people that still live a stone age existence.
Will you hook out the file? That sounds very interesting. Were they of Chinese features?
 

UnusualBean

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From what I've read about Japanese history it started from China. An emperor who was obsessed with obtaining eternal life had heard about a fountain of eternal life and equipped a ship to go in search of it. The ship returned and said they'd found it but it was guarded and the guardian required a heavy fee: people and riches. The emperor readily agreed, loaded his best craftsmen and skilled artisans, intellectuals and riches and sent the ship captain on his way to trade for the magic elixir. The captain never returned and shortly after what is now Japan was peopled with new arrivals. :) The captain sounds like a pirate at heart and a clever fellow.

Also, Japanese are not the original inhabitants of Japan. The Ainu were there first. The Japanese considered them savages and hunted them mercilessly. They chased them from the South (where the Japanese originally landed) to the North where the few remaining survivors still live in Yezu. The Ainu, being hunted and driven from their homes in turn chased out the "little people" (cave dwelling dwarves) that lived in the North.

The Smithsonian sent out some guy in the 1800's to investigate these Ainu peoples and he sent back his report which I've got stashed in my files somewhere. He says that after 1000 years of interaction with the Japanese, the Ainu people still have not adapted or learned any improvements for their living conditions that the Japanese introduced to them. A gentle, peaceful people that still live a stone age existence.
The Ainu are probably the least confusing part. Sure, most of their history is lost, but things don't get properly confusing until after the Korean invasion.

Modern Japan is a mixture of the native inhabitants' blood and Korean/Chinese blood via a mass immigration of Koreans supposedly a couple thousand years ago, but my money is on 300-600 at absolute most. There are also no pure blooded Ainu left in Japan, and even old photos of supposedly "pure" Ainu were mixed. The Ainu people were originally light haired/light eyed Caucasians, and the Koreans were what you think of today when you think "Asian". Of course, now that the written history and most of the oral tradition of the Ainu have been destroyed, it's easy to go back and rewrite them into a Mongoloid people.

It seems obvious to label the Ainu as the "savages" of the war, but since it's the victors who write the history books, it really could've been either them or the invading Koreans, and we may never know. I'm not even sure if there really was a clear victor though, because despite having oppressed the Ainu nearly out of existence, modern Japanese people seem to be proud of the way that racial mixture makes them different from other East Asians. Meh.
 

whitewave

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Will you hook out the file? That sounds very interesting. Were they of Chinese features?
The Ainos of Yezo, Japan
Sorry for the copypasta link but for some reason all my function buttons are missing. Best I could do.
The Ainu (pronounced "Eye No") were Caucasian looking. Not at all like what we associate with Asian features or color.
 

ScottFreeman

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What's your opinion of Shoch? I found him talking alongside the pyramid guy. Why would he go along with the pyramids being watered/rained on, and not underwater structures? I hope this doesn't derail anything, just curious. I know Hancock has a less than stella rep. in this circle. I heard what Hancock/Shoch had to say and it opened my view up but I haven't followed them since.
Personally, I think Schoch is correct about the water damage but he's damage control. It's the screwy dating being applied that's the magic. Everything good at Giza is 20m down, it's all buried in sand/mud and the sudden run-off from the flood draining back would cause that erosion. Could another civilization or perhaps survivors come along and rebuild the upper portions on the important parts? Isn't that place just a warren of tunnels? I wonder who might really be digging those, much more recently than we're told. Something this big would require complete control of excavating under military guard. And, oh well...now I'm just getting lost in "if' but fun, thanks.
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I have a personal issue with Hancock and that is... he came out publicly that he quit weed because his life revolved around it. But, then he left all of his great ideas behind and started writing fantasy again, all clouded with his infatuation with Ayahuasca/DMT. I feel he just lost the plot (as a new historian). I'm an old Head, I get drugs, I've seen "god", I get it. But, to really push such a delicate environment, I think it's a little misguided (throw NewEarth in there as another pro-DMT'er).

Then, he shows up on Joe Rogan and he starts to antagonize those who don't agree with him (which is basically anyone who got turned on by him, otherwise, no one knows who the heck he even is). This bothered me the most because he was in the same position with his theories and here he goes joining the shady media force behind all misconceptions and misdirections.

I love Schoch, I really do, he's on the verge of being that grumpy Indiana Jones type. Unfortunately, he'll be long dead before we see that rainwater caused erosion to the Sphinx is in any history book. Anyway, Graham tells the story that he brings Schoch to dive Yonaguni. Schoch was already nervous as heck and he had a small go at it. Apparently, he panicked or equipment failure (I can't tell what was being blamed) and he had enough. What Schoch did see during his brief dive amounted to what he considers full on naturally made. Maybe that's why those two have drifted apart and they aren't smoking weed on Rogan's podcast with Randall and Elon...
I think DMT may be just another way that humans found, or were given, to talk to their inner self, god, creator or whatever you decide to call it. You have to admit, western civilization has taken a pretty hard stance on allowing us to experiment with it. That alone makes me curious. Don't get me started on missing/dead homeopathic doctors.
 
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tupperaware

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I have a personal issue with Hancock and that is... he came out publicly that he quit weed because his life revolved around it. But, then he left all of his great ideas behind and started writing fantasy again, all clouded with his infatuation with Ayahuasca/DMT. I feel he just lost the plot (as a new historian). I'm an old Head, I get drugs, I've seen "god", I get it. But, to really push such a delicate environment, I think it's a little misguided (throw NewEarth in there as another pro-DMT'er).

Then, he shows up on Joe Rogan and he starts to antagonize those who don't agree with him (which is basically anyone who got turned on by him, otherwise, no one knows who the heck he even is). This bothered me the most because he was in the same position with his theories and here he goes joining the shady media force behind all misconceptions and misdirections.

I love Schoch, I really do, he's on the verge of being that grumpy Indiana Jones type. Unfortunately, he'll be long dead before we see that rainwater caused erosion to the Sphinx is in any history book. Anyway, Graham tells the story that he brings Schoch to dive Yonaguni. Schoch was already nervous as heck and he had a small go at it. Apparently, he panicked or equipment failure (I can't tell what was being blamed) and he had enough. What Schoch did see during his brief dive amounted to what he considers full on naturally made. Maybe that's why those two have drifted apart and they aren't smoking weed on Rogan's podcast with Randall and Elon...
Schoch in a documentary pointed out Yonaguni coastal rock structures that look the same as those underwater in composition and form but without any hint of being man made. That's why he thinks the underwater Yonaguni formation is natural. Geologist's are like that.
 

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