1597: trees used to grow in Antarctica?

KorbenDallas

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Ever been to Philippopolis-city? It's just across the river from the lush green Antarctica. A see a beach out there. I bet it was not that hard for Piri Reis to draw his map :unsure:

Chica sive Patagonica et Australis Terra 1598.jpg


1597
Chica sive Patagonica et Australis Terra 1597.jpg

Tropic of Capricorn

Today
World_map_with_tropic_of_capricorn.png


In 1597
Chica sive Patagonica et Australis Terra 1597_1.jpg

KD:
  • If this Earth was a sphere, that would require a polar shift
  • If the Earth had a flat surface, that would require our Sun to change its path
 

UnusualBean

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To me the Tropic of Capricorn looks like it's pretty much in the exact same spot now as it was on the old maps.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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To me the Tropic of Capricorn looks like it's pretty much in the exact same spot now as it was on the old maps.
That is if you consider this land mass to be Australia. As far as I understand, this is Terra Australis, which is Antarctica. Then again, with Nova Guinea up there, it's probably both. This way you are absolutely correct.

Only we have trees growing on the South Pole.
 

UnusualBean

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That is if you consider this land mass to be Australia. As far as I understand, this is Terra Australis, which is Antarctica. Then again, with Nova Guinea up there, it's probably both. This way you are absolutely correct.

Only we have trees growing on the South Pole.
Judging by Africa, South America, and New guinea, it seems to be in the same place as it always was. We definitely seem to have had a major climate shift in the last few hundred years, though.
 

whitewave

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It's a wonder those Romans could rule anything. Looks like they spent most of their time as construction workers building all over the place. Busy, busy boys.

On the subject of changing maps: In 1714 longitude was finally able to be calculated. Sounds innocuous enough-learning as we go. However, there were maps accurately depicting land masses long before 1714. In 1675 an observatory was erected to solve this "crisis" of global positioning. An international challenge in the form of a contest was proposed to entice the global thinkers of the time to resolve (re-solve) this problem. Since we know that Phoenicians and other sea peoples were adequately navigating the seas, establishing naval trade routes and what have you, one has to wonder what happened to the globe around 1675 to disorient the sailors so. Was there some global event that changed the positions of the land masses (Pangea breaking up) that required the world to re-learn the art of maritime navigation? linkie Could that be when Antarctica became a frozen waste land?
 

wild heretic

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It's a wonder those Romans could rule anything. Looks like they spent most of their time as construction workers building all over the place. Busy, busy boys.

On the subject of changing maps: In 1714 longitude was finally able to be calculated. Sounds innocuous enough-learning as we go. However, there were maps accurately depicting land masses long before 1714. In 1675 an observatory was erected to solve this "crisis" of global positioning. An international challenge in the form of a contest was proposed to entice the global thinkers of the time to resolve (re-solve) this problem. Since we know that Phoenicians and other sea peoples were adequately navigating the seas, establishing naval trade routes and what have you, one has to wonder what happened to the globe around 1675 to disorient the sailors so. Was there some global event that changed the positions of the land masses (Pangea breaking up) that required the world to re-learn the art of maritime navigation? linkie Could that be when Antarctica became a frozen waste land?
Close.

The time period you are describing (late 17th century) is the "mudflood" we see in all those youtube videos and pictures on this website (and mine too). That's the sunken building period. It seems to have ruined them too requiring a rebuild.

Antartica getting covered in ice is an even bigger event over 100 years before that. That links in to the late 16th century expansion (circa 1580). The one that divides the "ancient" (read medieval) world like Petra, Rome, Ephesus etc. with the modern one.

However, I don't know if there was some expansion for the last mudflood (late 17th). Probably, but according to the maps there definitely was a proper enlargement of the earth for the 1580 event. Even academia recognises this. I have a PDF somewhere stating that the Mercator maps (16th century) show a world that was something like 12% smaller than it is today. (I'll have to check that figure again. It's been a while).

I think you've found a major clue though regarding global positioning. I've found out that any landmass in an earthquake affected zone changes its global positioning before and after, at least that's what the maps of Nunivak Island (Alaska) are telling me. And this is right up until the early 50s.

The 17th century saw a lot of bad earthquakes and famines and wars so I imagine a lot of global readjustment was necessary continually.
Tropic of Capricorn

Today
View attachment 12359

In 1597
View attachment 12358
KD:
  • If this Earth was a sphere, that would require a polar shift
  • If the Earth had a flat surface, that would require our Sun to change its path

Pole shift.

Yes, Antarctica has got smaller but not as much as we think. I traced Australia over the old maps ages ago and found out that the islands of laua minor, Petan and Jap as well as the landmass that encompasses Beach, Maletur regnum (hint: "Kingdom") and Luoach regnum (another kingdom) are part of Australia today. The cut-off point is about where those trees and mountain ranges are above it. A lot of land came out of the ocean too.

Just take this latitude line where those trees and mountain ranges are above Maletur regnum and apply it to the whole of the old Antarctica as a cut-off line. Everything above that is the new Antarctica we have today (of course, some coastlines are different etc. as you would expect with such an earth movement). Now expand the oceans around Antarctica, expand the earth and voila you have todays's earth and south pole.

Oh I forgot the rotation. Antartica has also rotated quite a bit too (about 90 degrees if I remember it right). This is a massive clue to it being a Pangea earthquake expansion type event.

You're welcome. :D
 
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whitewave

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There have been, of course, many earth-altering catastrophes even in recent history/memory.

Tsunami alters earth axis The powerful earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami Friday (2011) appears to have moved the main island of Japan by 8 feet (2.4 meters) and shifted the Earth on its axis.

Earthquake alters Earths' axis Chile quake may have tipped Earth's axis. (CNN) -- The massive earthquake that struck Chile on Saturday may have shifted Earth's axis and created shorter days, scientists at NASA say. The change is negligible, but permanent: Each day should be 1.26 microseconds shorter, according to preliminary calculations. Mar 2, 2010

Axis shift and global changes Conspiracy site but still......

Volcano creates new land mass.


Explosive eruption on 22 February builds island — Kuwae is a submarine caldera between the Epi and Tongoa islands in Vanuatu. The submarine volcano Karua, one of the most active volcanoes of Vanuatu, is near the northern rim of Kuwae Caldera. Climatic consequences of 1452–1453 event: The Kuwae eruption has been linked with the second pulse of the Little Ice Age, which had started two centuries earlier with a series of four unidentified eruptions. A man wrote this report of island visit 10 days afterward: “On 22 February 1971, at about 0800, a known area of crustal instability began to erupt [at Karua], giving off clouds of steam and shooting black masses of cinder, ash, and pre-solidified crust up to 600 feet into the air. The activity intensified during the day with increasingly frequent explosions and clouds of dust being formed. At the height of the activity the eruption covered an area over one mile in diameter. Accompanying the volcanic explosions was tremendous thunder and lightning, precipitated by the intense heat of the eruption which led to condensation and great atmospheric instability. Then, very suddenly, at about 1800, the activity died away. “Ten days after the eruption, I went to the newly-formed land mass and found an almost moon-like terrain. The islet was flat with large boulders strewn about the surface. A few hot water pools were in evidence and there was a distinct smell of sulphur in the air. Underfoot the ground was still warm and when kicked smoke appeared from the ash and cinders of which the island was composed. On one side the sea was shallow for some distance but too hot to touch. This is the actual crater and the nucleus of all the activity. I estimate the island to be over half a mile wide and in the opinion of local pilots is easily large enough to land a light plane upon.” (Information Contact: Richard J. Ellis, Lakatoro, New Hebrides.)


A researcher at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said there has been a “dramatic shift” since 2000 the way the earth spins, attributing it to climate change. Greenland and Antarctica combined are losing more than 400 billion tons of ice per year and smaller glaciers around the world are also losing mass, contributing to the shift. Before 2000, Earth’s spin axis was drifting toward Canada. Ice loss in Greenland, Antarctica and elsewhere is pulling the direction of drift eastward. (NASA / Wikimedia Commons)

And further back in history:
1542411105603.png


I'd be interested to see that pdf of the Mercator maps if you can find it. As for Antarctica rotating, do you suppose that was due to melting ice caps since they supposedly act as the world gyroscope? Any sudden or massive melting would tip things dramatically. Thanks for the geological summary.
KD: if I didn't load these pictures properly.....mea culpa. :(
 

wild heretic

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I'd be interested to see that pdf of the Mercator maps if you can find it. As for Antarctica rotating, do you suppose that was due to melting ice caps since they supposedly act as the world gyroscope? Any sudden or massive melting would tip things dramatically. Thanks for the geological summary.
I am proponent of the concave earth theory. So in my opinion the earth is stationary and the skies spin around above us, so any change in "earth's spin" is really a change in the way the sun spins in the earth cavity.
 
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KorbenDallas

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Here is an example of how recent events are being pushed towards millions of years ago.
We show that the climate in lowland settings along the Wilkes Land coast (at a palaeolatitude of about 70° south) supported the growth of highly diverse, near-tropical forests characterized by mesothermal to megathermal floral elements including palms and Bombacoideae.
Palmtrees used to grow in Antarctica.
 

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