1550s Book Illustration Proves: VESUVIUS erupts, POMPEII destroyed, PLINY killed in 1482!!

Silvanus777

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#WICHTIG - Vesuv Ausbruch 1482 - Verschlingt Plinius - Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_85.jpg

Greetings, Stolen-Historians!

I give a sign of life, after prolonged. I thought it important to break my silence, if only for a moment, on the occasion of the above discovery.
(If in the meantime, another has discovered and shared this here, my apologies)

The above image is a hand painted book illustration taken from the Augsburg Book of Miracles, rediscovered in recent years (2007).
For your convenience I have added a translation of the hand written German language description accompanying the painting.

And I do hope that your jaws will drop just like mine did when I stumbled across this this very evening:

VESUVIUS erupted in 1483. It destroyed many cities and villages (think Pompeii and Herculaneum). The resulting pyroclasm killed an overly curious Pliny the Elder.

This stunning piece of evidence should go a long way to strengthen the case many here and elsewhere are making regarding the much later destruction of Pompeii and Herculaneum as propounded by currently accepted Scaligerian chronology. For me personally, I see my impressions and suspicions confirmed after I had bought Pliny's Natural History a year or two ago and skimming it, found it far too modern sounding. For instance as Pliny himself discusses his works as books written for and to be distributed among the common man, for his education and edification. Books for the common man are not possible prior to the invention of the printing press, which we are told occurred around 1439. Fits the death of Pliny in a 1483 eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

In closing, I refer you to this here article about the "miraculous re-discovery" of the manuscript: A miraculous Renaissance rediscovery

I find it quite relevant that the Augsburg Book of Miracles had remained hidden in private collections until it was accidentally "discovered" during an auction in 2007.
Thus sequestered think it may have gone under the radar and escaped destruction during the (ongoing) purging and re-writing of history over the past +/- 500 years.

Well friends of truth, I am quite thrilled to have stumbled over this sensational piece of evidence for many theories entertained by people like us here, and hope you will equally be able to appreciate it. What I see in front of me now - if time permits - is a thorough study of Pliny's Natural History and a lot of research into the consequences of assuming (for theorizing's sake) Pliny the Elder's death to 1482 A.D.! Feel free to draw your own conclusions from this, as need neither ask or allow you (haha!), while I slide back into the shadow of my silent studies.

I'll be back. Farewell for now!

EDIT: I forgot to mention: The illustrations in the Book of Miracles are painted in rather naive folk art style that has been common in German lands up until the 19th century (and beyond, though it's become rare!) especially in devotional or religious artwork of the rural people or "peasantry". Things like these reflect the common conceptions, knowledge and oral traditions of the ordinary folk, and I deem that far more trustworthy and authentic than anything coming from academia and "learned men" even or especially back then. I think this circumstance bolsters the case of this being a piece of "HIDDEN HISTORY" that has miraculously escaped the efforts of the purgers, re-writers and censors of the truth.
 
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Silvanus777

Silvanus777

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Yeah, sure it does.

You can look at the various illustrations in the Book of Miracles on wikimedia commons and you'll see that it lists and depicts all the wondrous signs and portents in chronological order, year by year. Most of them are from the 15th and 16th centuries, so up to the lifetime of the author. So this means the Vesuvian eruption destroying Pompeii etc. and death of Pliny the Elder (who is even depicted prominently in the artwork!!) are properly fitted into the order of events.

I can not see this being a mistake.
 
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Ice Nine

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This is such a great find @Silvanus777, I'm enjoying looking at all the plates. And something struck a cord with me in regards to the below imagine and captions. This was not a one off occurrence in the Netherlands. I remember reading such an occurrence happened in Vermeer's hometown of Delft in 1654.

Folio 156: “In 1546, in the month of August, the fire from the sky struck a tower in which were more than four hundred tons of powder, in Mechel in Niederland. And exactly half of the city burned down, which is also a special sign from God.” Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, c. 1550

Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_156.jpg

THE DELFT THUNDERCLAP OF 1654

THE DELFT THUNDERCLAP OF 1654
(Full text below for those wary of links)

Since the start of the Eighty Years War, the Dutch army had been keeping central stores of gunpowder within the city walls of Delft. In the late morning of October 12, 1654, the city was rocked by an explosion in the Doelenkwartier, between Geerweg and Doelstraat in the northeast section of the city. The magazine, used for storing ammunition for the defense of the city, had blown up. It contained some around 40 tonnes (80,000 to 90,000 pounds) of black powder stored in barrels in a former convent. The cause is not known, but the keeper of the magazine, Cornelis Soetens, went inside with a visitor. Half an hour later the magazine exploded.
This was not the first time, nor was it to be the last, that such an explosion devastated a Dutch city. There were explosions in Bredevoort in 1646, Heusden in 1680 (both caused by lightning), Maastricht in 1761, Amersfoort in 1787, when Our Lady’s Church was being used as a powder magazine. In Leiden in 1807, the vessel Delfs Welvaaren, moored in the Steenschuur canal in the middle of the city and laden with 38,000 pounds of black powder, blew up. Such was the force of this explosion that the ship’s anchor was found 900 meters away. And in modern times, unconnected with any war, there was the notorious Vuurwerkramp at Enschede in May 2000, when an explosion in a fireworks factory left 22 dead and 947 injured.

The magazine explosion in Delft in 1654, known to history as “Der Delftse Donderslag,” (The Delft Thunderclap), was the equivalent of some 22.5 tons of TNT, and was heard as far away as Texel on the North Sea, 150 km distant. A quarter of the city was destroyed and many of its inhabitants were killed and injured in the nearby residential area. It was dramatically said at the time that a hundred cannons aiming at the city could not have caused more damage. Two hundred houses were razed, and another three hundred damaged. Large trees were sheared off to stumps, and the stained glass and roof of the Nieuwe Kerk were destroyed. It’s fortunate that many of the citizens were out of city at the time, either at the Schiedam market or at a fair in The Hague. In an age of deep religious conviction, some naturally believed that it was the end of the world, with the gates of hell opening and God’s wrath raining down on the town. Although the number of casualties is unknown, it is estimated that the explosion caused at least a hundred deaths and injured thousands. Among the dead was one of Delft’s most famous painters, Carel Fabritius (1622-54), who died of his wounds sustained in the disaster. There is a grim painting by Egbert van den Poel (1621-64) that gives us an abiding image of the devastation. In the distance against the horizon the two major churches of the ruined city, the Oude and the Nieuwe Kerk, stand relatively intact. Between them is the Town Hall tower. The church on the extreme right is the chapel of the Hospital of St George in Noordeinde. To the right of the picture is the area where the gunpowder had been stored; all that remains are a crater filled with water, some burnt trees, roofless houses, and piles of rubble. In the foreground, people are busy helping the wounded and comforting each other. Two men crossing a bridge on the left of the picture carry a basket containing the few belongings they have managed to salvage. The painting, now in the National Gallery, London, and what it depicts, is made more poignant when we know that the artist’s son was killed that day.
the Egbert van den Poel painting
2013_AMS_03040_0129_000(egbert_van_der_poel_a_view_of_delft_with_the_explosion_of_1654).jpg
 

ISeenItFirst

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This is such a great find @Silvanus777, I'm enjoying looking at all the plates. And something struck a cord with me in regards to the below imagine and captions. This was not a one off occurrence in the Netherlands. I remember reading such an occurrence happened in Vermeer's hometown of Delft in 1654.

Folio 156: “In 1546, in the month of August, the fire from the sky struck a tower in which were more than four hundred tons of powder, in Mechel in Niederland. And exactly half of the city burned down, which is also a special sign from God.” Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, c. 1550
THE DELFT THUNDERCLAP OF 1654

THE DELFT THUNDERCLAP OF 1654
(Full text below for those wary of links)

Since the start of the Eighty Years War, the Dutch army had been keeping central stores of gunpowder within the city walls of Delft. In the late morning of October 12, 1654, the city was rocked by an explosion in the Doelenkwartier, between Geerweg and Doelstraat in the northeast section of the city. The magazine, used for storing ammunition for the defense of the city, had blown up. It contained some around 40 tonnes (80,000 to 90,000 pounds) of black powder stored in barrels in a former convent. The cause is not known, but the keeper of the magazine, Cornelis Soetens, went inside with a visitor. Half an hour later the magazine exploded.
This was not the first time, nor was it to be the last, that such an explosion devastated a Dutch city. There were explosions in Bredevoort in 1646, Heusden in 1680 (both caused by lightning), Maastricht in 1761, Amersfoort in 1787, when Our Lady’s Church was being used as a powder magazine. In Leiden in 1807, the vessel Delfs Welvaaren, moored in the Steenschuur canal in the middle of the city and laden with 38,000 pounds of black powder, blew up. Such was the force of this explosion that the ship’s anchor was found 900 meters away. And in modern times, unconnected with any war, there was the notorious Vuurwerkramp at Enschede in May 2000, when an explosion in a fireworks factory left 22 dead and 947 injured.

The magazine explosion in Delft in 1654, known to history as “Der Delftse Donderslag,” (The Delft Thunderclap), was the equivalent of some 22.5 tons of TNT, and was heard as far away as Texel on the North Sea, 150 km distant. A quarter of the city was destroyed and many of its inhabitants were killed and injured in the nearby residential area. It was dramatically said at the time that a hundred cannons aiming at the city could not have caused more damage. Two hundred houses were razed, and another three hundred damaged. Large trees were sheared off to stumps, and the stained glass and roof of the Nieuwe Kerk were destroyed. It’s fortunate that many of the citizens were out of city at the time, either at the Schiedam market or at a fair in The Hague. In an age of deep religious conviction, some naturally believed that it was the end of the world, with the gates of hell opening and God’s wrath raining down on the town. Although the number of casualties is unknown, it is estimated that the explosion caused at least a hundred deaths and injured thousands. Among the dead was one of Delft’s most famous painters, Carel Fabritius (1622-54), who died of his wounds sustained in the disaster. There is a grim painting by Egbert van den Poel (1621-64) that gives us an abiding image of the devastation. In the distance against the horizon the two major churches of the ruined city, the Oude and the Nieuwe Kerk, stand relatively intact. Between them is the Town Hall tower. The church on the extreme right is the chapel of the Hospital of St George in Noordeinde. To the right of the picture is the area where the gunpowder had been stored; all that remains are a crater filled with water, some burnt trees, roofless houses, and piles of rubble. In the foreground, people are busy helping the wounded and comforting each other. Two men crossing a bridge on the left of the picture carry a basket containing the few belongings they have managed to salvage. The painting, now in the National Gallery, London, and what it depicts, is made more poignant when we know that the artist’s son was killed that day.
the Egbert van den Poel painting
View attachment 21491
This is all pretty interesting. I didnt think the black powder of the day would have been that explosive in the first place. Outside of being in a contained system, like inside a barrel, in the open atmosphere, Id expect it just to burn. It would be a big hot fire, sure, but it would take some pretty interesting circumstances to throw a boat anchor
 

Ice Nine

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What the hell where the Dutch up too?! either they where black powder merchants or I wouldn't want to make the Dutch mad.

just a few figures from the article
It contained some around 40 tonnes (80,000 to 90,000 pounds) of black powder stored in barrels in a former convent. The cause is not known, but the keeper of the magazine, Cornelis Soetens, went inside with a visitor. Half an hour later the magazine exploded.

The magazine explosion in Delft in 1654, known to history as “Der Delftse Donderslag,” (The Delft Thunderclap), was the equivalent of some 22.5 tons of TNT, and was heard as far away as Texel on the North Sea, 150 km distant.

the vessel Delfs Welvaaren, moored in the Steenschuur canal in the middle of the city and laden with 38,000 pounds of black powder, blew up.
 

ISeenItFirst

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Is it possible that something else was being stored along with the gunpowder, something that made it explosive? Or perhaps it wasn't really gunpowder, but some other type of weapon or fuel.
I have no way of ruling either of those out. Both sound possible.

Here's something. Why mix so much of the black powder up? It's constituent parts are more or less stable, and decidedly non flammable. And physical mixing of fine powder of correct ratio is all that's required in a final step.

Merchants is a good thought. Carbon is easy, sulfur, probably moderate, where were they getting salt Peter from around them times.
 

MaybeLater

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What a great find! Thanks so much for sharing it.

Pliny the Elder and Vesuvius in 1482....Either nearly all of history as we've been taught is a lie, or it's suffered heavy duty Mandela Effects. It strikes me as very intriguing all the comets and the illnesses and death following them. Also the locusts. It appears that we are experiencing similar now in Saudi Arabia.
 

Ice Nine

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What a great find! Thanks so much for sharing it.

Pliny the Elder and Vesuvius in 1482....Either nearly all of history as we've been taught is a lie, or it's suffered heavy duty Mandela Effects. It strikes me as very intriguing all the comets and the illnesses and death following them. Also the locusts. It appears that we are experiencing similar now in Saudi Arabia.
Yeah what's up with all the comets, seems like an inordinate amount of them. Unless we get comets all the time and I'm not paying attention.
 

trismegistus

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Yeah what's up with all the comets, seems like an inordinate amount of them. Unless we get comets all the time and I'm not paying attention.
They seem more than just comets, imo.

Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_23__„Goldene_Kugel“.jpg


In der romer land lxxiii iar / vor Christi gepurt hat man ein guldene kuogel gesehen am himel die dan auff die erdt herab ist kumen vnnd vmb gwalczt / vnnd wieder auff in die luefft geflogen / gegen auffgang der sonnen / das sie mit irer grosse die sonnen bedeckt hatt / darnach gefolget der gross romer krig”​
(German) Folio 23: "In the land of the Romans in the year 73 B.C., a golden ball was seen in the sky, which then came down to the earth and rolled about and flew back up into the air again, in the direction of the rising sun, so that its great size covered up the sun completely. This was followed by the great Roman war." Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, c. 1550

This is a description of a UFO event. It seems like based off these illustrations that whatever extradimensional consciousness experience that mimics UFO experiences in the last 100 years was also seen and recorded back in those days.

Fascinating find @Silvanus777. I don't want to derail your thread with talk of UFOs, this manuscript could be the topic of many threads on this forum!
 

Ice Nine

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Some do sound like UFOs, there was some weird stuff flying around, it's a great book. Like a flying burning log for instance.

Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_35.jpg

Folio 35: "In the year A.D. 1009 the sun went dark and the moon was seen all blood-red and a great earthquake struck and there fell from the sky with a loud and crashing noise a huge burning torch like a column or a tower. This was followed by the death of many people and famine throughout Germany and Italy. More people died than remained alive." Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, c. 1555
1280px-Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch,_Folio_65.jpg
"In the year A.D. 1401, a large comet with a peacock tail appeared in the sky over Germany. This was followed by a most severe plague in Swabia." -- The Book of Miracles (f°74), ca 1552
Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_92.jpg
"In the year 1506, a comet appeared for several nights and turned its tail towards Spain. In this year, a lot of fruit grew and was completely destroyed by caterpillars or rats. This was followed eight and nine years later, in this country and in Italy, by an earthquake, so great and violent that in Constantinople a great many buildings were knocked down and people perished." Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch, c. 1550​


And more comets from the book, there are lots more. And most of them are associated with ensuing famine, plague, death and other catastrophes and destruction. things did not bode well for the inhabitants after a visit from a flaming Comet. Maybe the plague was sent here on purpose via comets and/or UFOs and flaming logs.

1280px-Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch,_Folio_70.jpgAugsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_121.jpgAugsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_122.jpg
1280px-Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch,_Folio_52.jpgAugsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch,_Folio_28.jpgAugsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_125.jpg
1280px-Augsburger_Wunderzeichenbuch_—_Folio_110.jpg
 

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