École des Beaux-Arts

trismegistus

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This topic has been deserving of its own thread for a long time.

When one starts diving into research on some of the incredible works that have come out of this school, and cross referencing it against the historical inconsistencies pointed out in this forum, it certainly raises some questions. For example, here is a list of comments I have made that have connected back to this school.

Theodore Robinson, Painter
George Cary, Architect, Buffalo Pan-Am
James Renwick Jr, Architect, Smithsonian

In particular James Renwick was the smoking gun to look more into this school, as I think I have shown in that thread that there is a strong possibility that James Renwick Jr. may have been a fake person, or at least not accurately represented in modern day research.

My working hypothesis is as follows: This architecture was not created by these architects, they were merely tasked with restoring these great works after their respective elite families had finished erasing the history of the civilization that existed previous to them. This previous civilization was concurrently responsible for what we consider "ancient" Greek and Roman architecture, as well as this "modern" revival of the style. Perhaps some were purposefully left un-restored in order to create a more manageable timeline - - one where we can clearly divide "Ancient" greeks/romans into the annals of history, versus the possibility that that civilization lived until a lot more recently than we think, possibly 2-300 years ago, and in a lot more places than we are told. The phantom time theory of Antony Fomenko is the glue that holds this theory together.

But I digress, let's start with the mainstream information we have on the school.

École des Beaux-Arts
paris-introduction-ecole-beaux-arts-a-old-print-1881-56030-p.jpg

1280px-la_cour_du_palais_des_tudes_de_lcole_des_beaux-arts.jpg

From Wiki:
An École des Beaux-Arts is one of a number of influential art schools in France. The most famous is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, now located on the left bank in Paris, across the Seine from the Louvre, at 14 rue Bonaparte (in the 6th arrondissement). The school has a history spanning more than 350 years, training many of the great artists in Europe. Beaux Arts style was modeled on classical "antiquities", preserving these idealized forms and passing the style on to future generations.
The origins of the school go back to 1648 when the Académie des Beaux-Arts was founded by Cardinal Mazarin to educate the most talented students in drawing, painting, sculpture, engraving, architecture and other media. Louis XIV was known to select graduates from the school to decorate the royal apartments at Versailles, and in 1863 Napoleon III granted the school independence from the government, changing the name to "L'École des Beaux-Arts". Women were admitted beginning in 1897.
We will get back to a key point in that summary later, but first I think it is important to help define the "style" of Beaux-Arts.

800px-La_Prensa_Newspaper_Building.jpg800px-Palacio_LCABA.jpg1280px-Buenos_Aires_-_Palacio_del_Congreso_de_la_Nación_Argentina_-HDR-_1.jpg1280px-Teatro_Colón,_Buenos_Aires.jpgbeaux-arts-paris-01.jpgbee_county_courthouse_lady_justice__wcw1310.jpgcoryell_county_courthouse_exc_raw1792a.jpghearst-castle-california-006.jpgLyon_France_2013_Beaux_Arts_DSC0180.jpgSouthWindowCasaGrande-by-JuliaMorgan.jpg

Fun fact, almost all of these structures are in North/South America, not Europe like one would assume.

From architecturalstyles.org:
PERIOD OF POPULARITY: 1893 – 1929 (Between the Chicago Columbian Exposition and the Great Depression)

INTRODUCTION TO REVIVAL STYLES: Each revival style identifies specifically with an architecture of an earlier time and place, especially those related to early American or European precedents. Several popular revival styles are included on this blog, though other, less popular revival styles also appeared. To classify this grouping of architectural styles presents a challenge, as one could argue that many earlier Victorian styles were similarly revivalist. In fact, one publication includes several revival styles within the larger category of Victorian architecture (Cunliffe, et. al. 2010). The concept of “period styles” has also been adopted by some writers (including this one), though it was an early 20th century term used by non-professionals to romanticize the past. On the flip side are the architectural historians who prefer the more academic “Age of eclecticism” or “Eclectic Era,” which is an important concept to provide historical context here. The Eclectic Era, however, includes both revival and early modern styles that competed ideologically and appeared nearly simultaneously before the Great Depression. For purposes here, then, “revival styles” seems most appropriate, adapted widely across America for use in middle-class homes, wealthy country houses, commercial buildings, early skyscrapers, and civic buildings. Though overlapping with the more picturesque Victorian era, these styles largely gained popularity during the first two decades of the 20th century and heavily influenced our residential and commercial landscapes.

During this time (mostly between 1900 and 1929), accuracy of styles became important once again, unlike Queen Anne style, which borrowed from a variety of sources. Most Important, revival styles look to the past for inspiration. The trend toward revivalist architecture gained momentum from the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, the Columbian Exposition, where historical interpretations of European styles were encouraged. Simultaneous to the rise of revivalist architecture, the modern era saw its beginnings with architects who were instead looking to the future, not to the past, with more progressive, modernist styles. Thus defines the Eclectic Movement of the early 20th century, which consisted of a simultaneous and perhaps competing interest in both modern and historic architectural traditions. This variety, or eclecticism, provided for one of the most diverse and colorful periods for architecture and urban design in American history, when almost anyone with at least a middle-class income could choose from one of a dozen or more styles for their home.
I feel as if there is a bit of cognitive dissonance here. Architects are challenged to lump all of this revival into one overall style which they seem to want to call "Eclectic" which is a nice cop-out in my opinion. Moreover, the fact that they somehow all cropped up simultaneously is curious. Apparently this school was around for hundreds of years, but they didn't start doing buildings until the 1900s?

Cardinal Mazarin
220px-Cardinal_Mazarin_by_Pierre_Mignard_(Musée_Condé).jpg

800px-Jules_Mazarin_in_1632.jpgItalian_-_Cardinal_Mazarin_Riding_To_Villafranca_with_the_Treaty_of_Peace_-_Walters_371161.jpg
Cardinal Jules Mazarin (14 July 1602 – 9 March 1661), born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino [ˈdʒuːljo raiˈmondo madːzaˈriːno] or Mazarini, was an Italian-born cardinal, diplomat, and politician, who served as the Chief Minister to the kings of France Louis XIII and Louis XIV from 1642 until his death. In 1654 he acquired the title Duke of Mayenne, and in 1659, 1st Duke of Rethel and Nevers.

After serving as a papal diplomat for Pope Urban VIII, Mazarin offered his diplomatic services to Cardinal Richelieu and moved to Paris. Following the death of Richelieu and then of Louis XIII, Mazarin became the head of the government for Anne of Austria, the Regent of the young Louis XIV, and was also made responsible for the King's education until he came of age.
Mazarin, as the actual (de facto) ruler of France, played a crucial role in establishing the Westphalian principles that would guide European states' foreign policy and the prevailing world order. Some of these principles, such as the nation state's sovereignty over its territory and domestic affairs and the legal equality among states, remain the basis of international law to this day.

In addition to his diplomacy, Mazarin was an important patron of the arts. He introduced Italian opera on a grand scale to Paris, and assembled a remarkable art collection, much of which today can be seen in the Louvre. He also founded the Bibliothèque Mazarine, the first true public library in France, which is now found in the Institut de France, across the Seine from the Louvre.
Busy man, this Cardinal. Not only was he the de facto ruler of France (!) for some time, but he also was also a grand patron of the arts. Perhaps someone with a better ability to internet sleuth could determine this, but I have a feeling that this guy must be related to some secret faction, Jesuits/Rosicrucians/etc.

Oh, and look at his family crest. You SH-ers will immediately get the reference.
Coat_of_arms_of_Cardinal_Mazarin.svg.png
I see you there, facses. You sure have a clever way of showing up in these rabbit holes of ours...

I think the fact that you can trace a lot of strange history back to a handful of schools, individuals, and families is suspect in and of itself. On top of that, once you start getting symbols that match up you really start cooking with gas.

What do you say? Are we looking at the ultimate gatekeepers of history?
 

sonoman

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Oh, and look at his family crest. You SH-ers will immediately get the reference.
not only the axe bundle but also the red shield/hat and the triple crown city state stars as now found on the D.C. flag. dont think Ive seen any crest before with all that in one. and all those tassels seem to show two bloodlines multiplying (in breeding)

also bears some resemblance of the Labarum Labarum - Wikipedia
277px-Labarum_of_Constantine_the_Great.svg.png



Ellipsis - Wikipedia

An ellipsis (plural ellipses; from the Ancient Greek: ἔλλειψις, élleipsis, 'omission' or 'falling short') is a series of dots (typically three, such as "…") that usually indicates an intentional omission of a word, sentence, or whole section from a text without altering its original meaning
p.s. the fasces is a bundle of branches wrapped around the axle (polarized) symbolizing strength in numbers of people (mob rule).
 
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CyborgNinja

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My working hypothesis is as follows: This architecture was not created by these architects, they were merely tasked with restoring these great works after their respective elite families had finished erasing the history of the civilization that existed previous to them. This previous civilization was concurrently responsible for what we consider "ancient" Greek and Roman architecture, as well as this "modern" revival of the style. Perhaps some were purposefully left un-restored in order to create a more manageable timeline - - one where we can clearly divide "Ancient" greeks/romans into the annals of history, versus the possibility that that civilization lived until a lot more recently than we think, possibly 2-300 years ago, and in a lot more places than we are told. The phantom time theory of Antony Fomenko is the glue that holds this theory together.
That's a pretty good summary of what we're working with here. I've been working on a short punchy explination like this to have pinned on the homepage. The idea being to bring new comers up to speed in a single paragraph.

The problem being that the whole tartary/ mud flood/ stolen history genre explination is so complex, can it be summerized in a compact little parcel?

I'd like to appeal to the community for submissions of a succinct explination of the whole genre. Something like what you've written is what I'm hoping for.
 

anotherlayer

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The problem being that the whole tartary/ mud flood/ stolen history genre explination is so complex, can it be summerized in a compact little parcel?
Just general thoughts... I think we put way too much behind both the 'mud flood' and 'tartary'. We are giving Tartary so much credit, so much glory and prestige, but the only thing I ever read about Tartars were that they were Muslims, the women hunted better than the men, they wore the hides of their kills and were otherwise ornery people. Everyday there is another video on YouTube throwing around the term 'Tartary' and it has become this runaway keyword with so little to back it up. I think the Russians have already long exhausted any substantial claims that Grande Tartaria was anything more than a very large kingdom slowly whittled away. Here we are insisting every building in every black & white photograph is mudflooded and our ability to have built anything besides a log cabin is suddenly unbelievable.

Which leads me to the second theory, "mud flood". If I have to watch another YouTube show images of modern cities with buildings that have windows in their basement claim that it is 100% mud flood proof, I'm going to hold my breath and count to ten. I'm looking at you Barnabas Nagy, your research is thin as ice. Now the mud flood has suddenly swept through South America?

ok, /rant
 

KorbenDallas

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Mud from the sky type paintings are plenty.
It’s definitely for a different thread altogether.

Let’s preserve this one for the French school.
 

anotherlayer

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Let’s preserve this one for the French school.
Agreed. And I found this write up about The City Beautiful Movement of the 1890s. Some interesting bits here...

The most visible expression of this belief in the creation of moral and civic virtue in the urban population was created by the reformers of the City Beautiful movement. The movement was conceived as explicitly reform-minded; Daniel Burnham, a leading proponent of the movement, linked their efforts with Progressivism. A reform "of the landscape, he suggested, [would] complement the burgeoning reforms in other areas of society." (Hines, 95) While other reformers concentrated on improving sanitary conditions or opening missions like Jane Addams' Hull House in Chicago, the City Beautiful leaders (upper-middle class, white, male), believed the emphasis should be on creating a beautiful city, which would in turn inspire its inhabitants to moral and civic virtue. "The reform movement in America, which had largely been concerned with corruption in local government, exploitation of the laboring classes by big business, improvement in housing conditions in large cities, and other social causes, quickly embraced the concept of the city beautiful as an American goal."
Clearly we are talking about some of that so-called "tartarian" architecture here, yeah?

Generally stated, the City Beautiful advocates sought to improve their city through beautification, which would have a number of effects: 1) social ills would be swept away, as the beauty of the city would inspire civic loyalty and moral rectitude in the impoverished; 2) American cities would be brought to cultural parity with their European competitors through the use of the European Beaux-Arts idiom; and 3) a more inviting city center still would not bring the upper classes back to live, but certainly to work and spend money in the urban areas.
I think this describes how we feel when we look at these old buildings:

the City Beautiful reformers believed that "'civic loyalty' itself--that elusive abstraction which rolled so easily from Progressive tongues--[could] provide the foundation stone" for a harmonious urban moral order.
We marvel at these buildings. Grand palaces for the US mail and Courthouses to drag the dregs of society through. And when I look at our architecture today, I realize that it too is akin to our current urban moral order. It's shite.

And what is a thread without a mention of the ol' Expo of 1893:

The idiom the City Beautiful leaders used in their ideal civic centers was the Beaux-Arts style, named for the famous Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, which instructed artists and architects in the necessity of order, dignity, and harmony in their work. The first expression of this monumental style in the United States was found at the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893.
 

CyborgNinja

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Just general thoughts... I think we put way too much behind both the 'mud flood' and 'tartary'. We are giving Tartary so much credit, so much glory and prestige, but the only thing I ever read about Tartars were that they were Muslims, the women hunted better than the men, they wore the hides of their kills and were otherwise ornery people. Everyday there is another video on YouTube throwing around the term 'Tartary' and it has become this runaway keyword with so little to back it up. I think the Russians have already long exhausted any substantial claims that Grande Tartaria was anything more than a very large kingdom slowly whittled away. Here we are insisting every building in every black & white photograph is mudflooded and our ability to have built anything besides a log cabin is suddenly unbelievable.

Which leads me to the second theory, "mud flood". If I have to watch another YouTube show images of modern cities with buildings that have windows in their basement claim that it is 100% mud flood proof, I'm going to hold my breath and count to ten. I'm looking at you Barnabas Nagy, your research is thin as ice. Now the mud flood has suddenly swept through South America?

ok, /rant
Oh I agree entirely with all of your points.

1. Tartary isn't the be all and end all of this genre. It is however a gate way to further understanding of our stolen history.

New youtube channels coming out of the wood work every other day is a good thing. The majority of them are quite shallow but it brings in new people.

2. I have seen Barnabas Nagy's work and he presents well but like you say, claiming every building with basement windows is a "mudflooder" or that countries like NZ are full of ancient buildings is just reckless.

I'm from NZ and believe me, I wish what Barnabas Nagy is claiming were true. I am yet to find any evidence to support that. Nice guy but he's doing everyone a disservice.

I think it's important that we settle on an over arching name for this genre as, like you said Tartary and mudflood don't quite do it justice.
 
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trismegistus

trismegistus

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not only the axe bundle but also the red shield/hat and the triple crown city state stars as now found on the D.C. flag. dont think Ive seen any crest before with all that in one. and all those tassels seem to show two bloodlines multiplying (in breeding)
Can't say I've noticed the DC flag until you mentioned it, and you're absolutely right. As if the list of "accomplishments" wasn't enough, his seal makes quite a few strong statements about his bloodline. Very spooky individual when you line all those symbols out.
 

sonoman

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(măz′ə-răN′), Jules Originally Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino. 1602-1661.
Italian-born French cardinal who exercised great political influence as adviser to the regent during Louis XIV's youth.
Mazarin

Can't say I've noticed the DC flag until you mentioned it, and you're absolutely right. As if the list of "accomplishments" wasn't enough, his seal makes quite a few strong statements about his bloodline. Very spooky individual when you line all those symbols out.
yes, I think you have struck a huge golden nugget here.

previously you mentioned this:
someone with a better ability to internet sleuth could determine this, but I have a feeling that this guy must be related to some secret faction, Jesuits/Rosicrucians/etc.
France is Knights Templar territory for sure and this CIA YT chan:
Central Intelligence Agency

covers lots of the symbol and territory of them, I have watched many of his vids, he is really good decoder but very bitter and sometimes looks too hard into things and seems to see what he wants to. He connects the Templars to the more ancient Pharaohs and masonic orders but its hard to follow his connections sometimes so when I first tuned in to his stuff I figured the Pharaoh connections were a stretch but after much surfing and reading elsewhere it does start to add up.

besides all that, some of his vids are fantastic just from the natural background scenery of the alpine villages and many castles all over europe.

he is a mad man and justifiably so if you listen to his story but I can only listen to such anger so much and have to tune out and come back later. I would have watched all of his vids by now if it wasnt for that. he has two other older YT chans but I dont have the links to them on this system.
Despite the pro-satanic religious warfare launched under the leading role and associated provocations by the Habsburgs from 1492 through 1648, the launching of the modern nation-state premised on the central influence of Nicholas of Cusa, and the 1648 resuscitation of European civilization through the intervention of such as Cardinal Mazarin and his associate Jean-Baptiste Colbert, has defined the platform on which all of the great accomplishments of modern European civilization have depended, essentially.
from: The Science of Physical Economy - Economics as History
During those historical intervals of modern European history, from the birth of the Fifteenth-century Renaissance at the great ecumenical Council of Florence, through the high points of the history of our U.S. constitutional republic, the driving force for the progress of civilization has centered, since February 1763, on the initiative which produced the unique form of constitutional, republican self-government of our own United States.
looks like his most modern descendant of notable fame is Ferreri Giuseppe
Il Mistero Mazzarino di Ferreri Giuseppe

a minister of the most wealthy city on earth, 'Monaco'

blason.jpg (image)

Izreal Zeus: Sorcerers of Chaldaea

this is the image of the cover of a book found in the vatican library that Yergen posted on this thread Welcome to the Vatican Library Secret Archives... you are not!

Inc.De.Luca.22_0001_fa_0001_m.jpg
 
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trismegistus

trismegistus

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Do these Vatican hats look a bit...flying saucer-y to anyone else? If so, it's even more reason for inter-breeding in their bloodlines.

Galero ausgebreitet.jpgGalero_cardinalice.jpg30f57f871d29b93aceb2416d3c15d2ac--secretary-churches.jpgflaibam-rc-arms.jpg

From the Philippi Collection:

Previously worn in the Roman Catholic Church by cardinals in festive processions such as at the coronation of a pope in an era when cavalcades with horses were still common. On the death of a cardinal, his galero was initially placed at the foot of the catafalque and later hung above his tomb. During the period when the pope presented a galero in a consistory, the cardinal receiving it would place it between two candlesticks on a credence table in his antechamber or study. This was considered a sign of respect for the origin of the cardinal's dignity, directly and immediately from the hand of the pope. The body of the hat is made of felt dyed ruby-red and lined inside with ruby-red silk. From the right and left hand sides of the galero hang red and gold cords ending in a "tassel tree". Each of these "trees" consists of 15 tassels, making 30 tassels in all. Each tassel is ornamented with gold thread and consists of three strings with three smaller tassels. There are also two tassels fixed above the brim of the hat.
 

sonoman

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the red hat is identical to an actual shield that is posted elsewhere here, maybe on a rofschild thread? but I think the hat is a symbol itself for the red shield.

I'll link the photo of the shield here next time I run across it. its on here (SH) somewhere I think.

here is the RCs coat of arms:
670px-Great_coat_of_arms_of_Rothschild_family.svg.png

notice the center cap?
Rothschild family - Wikipedia

the real photo of one of the surviving shields, its not a pointed center its rounded and looks exactly like those hats.
 
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