Tech

Technological achievements of the past that cannot be properly explained

Year 1834 - Russian submarine rocket launch

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I am not quite sure what to make of this interesting piece of information, but apparently Russians managed to launch some rockets from a submerged submarine as far back as 1834. Looks like they hit their targets as well. No clue why somebody would conceive such an idea in 1834. Granted, the sub...

Ironclad ships - another example of Tartarian technology?

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In my opinion, most of the ironclads (if not all) have nothing to do with progressive development of our technology. In other words, they came from nowhere. Another way of saying this would be something like this: we operated these ships, but we did not build them. I do not know who built them...

Our civilization did not build Titanic, Olympic or Britannic. Theirs did. Was it the Tartarian one?

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Once again, tackling a well known topic, I risk to sound ridiculous but hold your judgement till you have some material objections to make. Jumping ahead I will say, that the issue of "we did not build this ship" extends way beyond these three ships. In reality, this is one of those instances...

Sedona, Utah: circular saw or a weird natural occurrence?

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There are a lot of bizarre rock formations in the Sedona area of Utah. A few days ago I took a couple of pictures of this strange cut on the side of this huge rock. What, in your opinion, could be the cause of this circular cut out looking thingy...

Flame-bladed swords. 15th Century Pro-Sports, and the Battle of Anghiari.

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The battle is well known for its depiction in a now-lost painting by Leonardo da Vinci. It is probably painted on the wall of the same room where NASA's lost Moon Landing Footage is being kept. Though "specialists" say that it might be hidden beneath later frescoes in the Hall of Five Hundred.

1900-1915 HD quality photos of the United States cities. Is that normal?

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I don't know about you, but this quality of the 1900-1915 photography does not quite match my perception, based on the dogmatic education I received. Below are some photos available on the Library of Congress website. The quality is beyond explainable IMHO. These photographs predominantly...

Drones: Unmanned Systems of World Wars I and II

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Drones, or any other unmanned vehicles are normal occurrence in today's life. Yet, I was surprised to find out that there were plenty of unmanned systems as early as 1915. I understand, that in part it demonstrates certain blank spots in my own education, and general knowledge. At the same time...

16th century rockets: manned, multistaged and nozzled?

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I don't know much about the 16th century rockets, but some things appear to be so out of place, that acceptance of their existence is very strange. The origins of the knowledge are not being questioned. Why? According to our traditional science, even...

Jedi Knights of the 17th century

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Bizarre things dug out from the literature of the past keep on coming. Whatever is depicted on the images below is beyond my understanding, when looked from the conventional stand point. Of course being in French, and German, understanding of these books does not help my comprehension of the...

The obscure high-tech Stone Age "they" do not want you to know about

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"The Stone Age was a time thousands of years ago, when humans lived in caves and jungles. Life was simple, and there were only two main things to do - to protect themselves from the wild animals and to gather food. It started almost with the evolution of mankind. For both purposes, people...

60,000 pieces, 240 years old. Jaquet-Droz's dolls still write, draw, and play music

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There had to be something in the water in the 18th century. A whole lot of people acquired some amazing skills out of, what seems, nowhere. Another one of these brilliant individuals was Pierre Jaquet-Droz. He was born on July 28, 1721, in La Chaux-de-Fonds, in Canton Neuchâtel, Switzerland. He...

Moving sidewalks at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris

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This is amazing how one thing leads to another. Looking into the so-called achievements of the 19th century, I keep on running into one too many of those "ahead of its time" inventions. This time it is moving sidewalks. These sidewalks I am about to present were powered by electricity (Le...

The impossible colossal "King Bath Tub" - who really produced this monster?

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According to everything we know about the 19th century, and specifically 1820s, this humongous bath tub is not supposed to exist. Of course it does, and I have quite a few reasons to question everything about this Russian bath tub besides its existence. For the traditional review type article of...

Ditch Tesla, buy Babcock Runabout: 1,244 miles on one battery in 1909

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How many electric car models do you know of the top of your head? Probably three or four. If you are really into it, may be ten, though I'm not even sure there are ten contemporary electric car models out there. Well, in the beginning of the 20th century there were hundreds of different models...

Hyperloop pneumatic subway existed in the 19th century

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Another proof that there were technologies far superior to the time when they were introduced is the pneumatic tube saga of the 19th century. What we know today as the Hyperloop was used in New York...

The impossible ship: SS Great Eastern a.k.a. Leviathan

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FYI: the rise of publishing by the eighteenth century led to the use of newspapers and cheap editions of popular books for cleansing. Lord Chesterfield, in a letter to his son in 1747, told of a man who purchased a common edition of Horace, of which he tore off gradually a couple of pages...

James Cox's peacock clock presented to Catherine II in 1781

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The Peacock Clock is a large automaton featuring three life-sized mechanical birds. It was manufactured by the entrepreneur James Cox in the 2nd half of the 18th century and...

Kulibin's egg-shaped clock presented to Catherine II in 1769

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Traditional knowledge states: Ivan Petrovich Kulibin (April 21, 1735 – August 11, 1818) was a Russian mechanic and inventor. He was born in Nizhny Novgorod in the family of a trader. From childhood, Kulibin displayed an interest in constructing mechanical tools. Soon, clock mechanisms became a...

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